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Affinity products for Linux


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2 minutes ago, PoVRAZOR said:

 

This isn't tech support, but the apps only show checkerboards instead of images, and palettes/swatches have been replaced with dots.

No it isn't, but there was an update yesterday - look for information in that as it might help.

Ali 🙂

Just beginning to learn how to use my DSLR again after 20 years!
Running Affinity Suite 1.10.4 on Windows 11 17" HP Envy i7 (8th Gen) & Windows 11 MS Surface Go 3 alongside MS365 (Insider Channel).

 

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8 minutes ago, Ali said:

No it isn't, but there was an update yesterday - look for information in that as it might help.

I'm running the latest versions. Latest Affinity, latest Windows 11, latest graphics drivers (Intel and AMD).

Edited by PoVRAZOR
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As people have pointed out there are so many commercial applications that are on linux and are used. I use the Substance suite, Blender and Unity, which are my softwares of choice, but forced to use gimp/krita which aren't my choice. It's a mixed bag of FOSS and commercial. I think a lot of people consider Linux as a whole some kind of anti-consumer, anti-commercial, anti-paid software OS for hobbyist programmers with tinfoil hats but it's absolutely not like that. Linux is just one of three options that happens to be FOSS where the other two aren't (being FOSS is a good thing, not bad). Boggles my mind that it's even an argument for some people. 

'Hey Serif, stop working on the iOS version of Affinity because most people don't even use it and it's wasting resources that could be put toward the OS I use!' 

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23 hours ago, MattyWS said:

As people have pointed out there are so many commercial applications that are on linux and are used. I use the Substance suite, Blender and Unity, which are my softwares of choice, but forced to use gimp/krita which aren't my choice. It's a mixed bag of FOSS and commercial. I think a lot of people consider Linux as a whole some kind of anti-consumer, anti-commercial, anti-paid software OS for hobbyist programmers with tinfoil hats but it's absolutely not like that. Linux is just one of three options that happens to be FOSS where the other two aren't (being FOSS is a good thing, not bad). Boggles my mind that it's even an argument for some people. 

'Hey Serif, stop working on the iOS version of Affinity because most people don't even use it and it's wasting resources that could be put toward the OS I use!' 

I fully agree with you and I am also not one of those 'must only be free to use and must only be able to read the source code' minority zealots (they do speak loudly though). I am fully in favour of paid applications being available on the Linux platform and I'm happy to pay for good software like Pixeluvo and SoftMaker Office, for example. While I cannot buy free software, I do contribute to projects like Gimp so that improvements can be made and in both cases the motivation is the same because developers should be rewarded for the work that they put in to provide us with useful software.

Things are getting better all the while and we now have the Figma and Lunacy graphic editors and I have used Canva for a number of projects. Indeed, it is possible that we might get Adobe's Photoshop and Illustrator as online apps some time in the future and that would be very welcome. In your case right now, why not try out PhotoLine with Wine?

I do think though that Serif Affinity are doing exactly the right thing by making an iOS app because iPads are used for a lot of professional design work and that's bringing in quite a lot of money for Serif Affinity that in turn feeds into further improvements.

 

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9 minutes ago, LondonSquirrel said:

A whole 'one'? Well that will skew the figures.

yea, it does. if I can list one by chance before you even mentioned it, in a list of 2 on an unrelated note, then chances are there's a f*ck ton more not listed in a clearly not very comprehensive list. I could make a list of 100 or so random proprietary software for windows too, do you think it can be used as an argument to say that windows only has 100 proprietary softwares? Or do you think maybe I should have done my research and it'd be a stupid attempt at confirming a bias I may have?

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1 hour ago, LondonSquirrel said:

There are not nearly as many commercial apps for Linux as there are for Windows. It's about at tiny part of 1% in comparison. 

Certainly a lot less, not sure it's a "tiny part of 1%", but yeah it's probably around 1%-ish.

Still, there's several hundred commercial programs that are profitable on the OS.

No reason why the Affinity suite couldn't be among those.

 

Developing just for Linux? Yeah, that's dumb.

Porting to Linux and doing what's needed to gt it working? It works for a lot of the companies that have  tried it.

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Seems like Serif is missing this horse while Adobe is not. Adobe launched last week the browser version of Photoshop and Illustrator. Still not supporting all the features but many would be able to use it on Linux and it's just a matter of time for Adobe to add many more features and move other applications on browser. Like The Linux Experiment says in this video, Photoshop is often cited in the main reasons for not switching to Linux (for whom have that interest, many people stick to Win or Mac anyway), meaning that Linux will probably see more users thanks to Adobe.

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17 hours ago, Pandorino said:

Seems like Serif is missing this horse while Adobe is not. Adobe launched last week the browser version of Photoshop and Illustrator. Still not supporting all the features but many would be able to use it on Linux ...

From the page in the first link. Emphasis is mine.

" And Creative Cloud subscribers can make light edits to Photoshop or Illustrator files right in their browser."

Doesn't sound like you would be able to use Photoshop on Linux, you are going to need a Windows or Mac machine to do actual work on and have the CC account and then you can make light edits (who knows how light) on Linux.

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012) Mac OS 10.12.6 || Mac Pro (Late 2013) Mac OS 11.6.8

Affinity Designer 1.10.5 | Affinity Photo 1.10.5 | Affinity Publisher 1.10.5 | Beta versions as they appear.

I have never mastered color management, period, so I cannot help with that.

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On 10/16/2021 at 9:24 PM, PSDfield said:

Especially in time like these and the new Windows 11, which so far does not attact many productivity oder gaming user, there is a rise in interest in lunux distros like Pop_OS and other well documented distros like Ubuntu.

Since Snap for Ubuntu exists, there are even more good reasons for Affinity to shine on Linux. Productivity, performance, security and even in some cases usability are all reasons to switch to Linux (or dual-boot).

The Windows App Store will support Android Apps soon, many once plattform exclusive Apps and services become more available via browsers and cross-plattform. Plattform independence should always be a huge bonus for software developers. So please Serif do not ignore this.

Your best bet there might be to ask the developers of PhotoLine on their forums if they would consider bundling up PhotoLine with Wine as an Ubuntu Snap in the Snap Store.

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On 11/2/2021 at 8:12 PM, LondonSquirrel said:

There are not nearly as many commercial apps for Linux as there are for Windows. It's about at tiny part of 1% in comparison. 

I'm sorry, but what the hell guys?! You are really arguing about how many commercial apps on Linux?! C'mon this is a thread about Affinity supporting Linux!!!

Edited by Anon172
wrongly formatted
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Also, if Serif ever develops a Linux version, please do it with Flatpak. Snap is pain with custom cursors, themes, and is very slow. However, at flatpak, for custom themes, there is stylepak, and for custom cursors, you just have to override cursors in the terminal.

Edited by Anon172
was unclear
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14 minutes ago, Anon172 said:

please do it with Flatpak. Snap is pain

And here is another example of why there will never be a 'year of the Linux desktop': two competing methods of packaging up apps supposedly to make things easier. In this thread we have some people say 'use Snap', and somebody else 'use Flatpak', one saying Snap is good and the other saying Snap is bad. You cannot even agree on a packaging system.

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1 minute ago, LondonSquirrel said:

And here is another example of why there will never be a 'year of the Linux desktop': two competing methods of packaging up apps supposedly to make things easier. In this thread we have some people say 'use Snap', and somebody else 'use Flatpak', one saying Snap is good and the other saying Snap is bad. You cannot even agree on a packaging system.

Why not use both! ('only means a bit more work for the developers, I'm sure they've got nothing better to do!) 😁

Acer XC-895 : Core i5-10400 Hexa-core 2.90 GHz :  32GB RAM : Intel UHD Graphics 630 : Windows 10 Home
Affinity Publisher : Affinity Photo : Affinity Designer (latest release versions) | Affinity Photo for iPad

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2 hours ago, LondonSquirrel said:

And here is another example of why there will never be a 'year of the Linux desktop': two competing methods of packaging up apps supposedly to make things easier. In this thread we have some people say 'use Snap', and somebody else 'use Flatpak', one saying Snap is good and the other saying Snap is bad. You cannot even agree on a packaging system.

That's pretty much Canonical (the people who maintain Ubuntu) vs. Everyone Else. In the end, it doesn't make that much of a difference, since almost all apps available as flatpaks have snaps and vice versa, and it's easy to use them both.

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2 minutes ago, Renzatic said:

That's pretty much Canonical (the people who maintain Ubuntu) vs. Everyone Else. In the end, it doesn't make that much of a difference, since almost all apps available as flatpaks have snaps and vice versa, and it's easy to use them both.

But as I said, it has big disadvantages.

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2 minutes ago, Anon172 said:

But as I said, it has big disadvantages.

From what I gather, snaps are slowly going the way of the dodo anyway, so it's really all academic by this point.

There's only one distro out there that supports snaps out of the box, and that's Ubuntu. The rest, even those forked from Ubuntu, are using flatpaks.

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1 hour ago, Renzatic said:

it's easy to use them both

Why not just have one?

1 hour ago, Anon172 said:

But as I said, it has big disadvantages.

There you are: arguing about a package system. And so it has ever been with Linux about everything.

RPMs are best. No DEBs are better. Pacman is better still. I say that Nix is better, and that is the reason why I nail my colours to the mast and use NixOS. Me and the other three people using this fantastic distribution snootily look down our noses at RPMs. You Nix people don't know anything, if you want the best options use Portage for all your packaging needs, emerge is a user-friendly command.

Next week there will be another packaging system to rule them all. People (Linux developers) waste so much time on this sort of thing. The supposed benefits of one package system over another are marginal. 

Blah blah blah.

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5 minutes ago, LondonSquirrel said:

Why not just have one?

There you are: arguing about a package system. And so it has ever been with Linux about everything.

RPMs are best. No DEBs are better. Pacman is better still. I say that Nix is better, and that is the reason why I nail my colours to the mast and use NixOS. Me and the other three people using this fantastic distribution snootily look down our noses at RPMs. You Nix people don't know anything, if you want the best options use Portage for all your packaging needs, emerge is a user-friendly command.

Next week there will be another packaging system to rule them all. People (Linux developers) waste so much time on this sort of thing. The supposed benefits of one package system over another are marginal. 

Blah blah blah.

True, because that is Linux, as effect of being free and open, a testing bench and a place for debate. Also wrong due to so many misconceptions I see here.

I won't take one by one now, again and again. But packing is not an issue at all. For example, there is a closed source third party LEGO modelling tool, LDCad that uses accelerated graphics and comes as a sh installer. It simply worked for me everywhere, so it's possible. It's also one man's effort, although not simple at all.

No need for snaps, flatpaks, rpms, whatever option like those.

So it's possible.

On the other hand, remember Oracle. You peek one of their supported OSes, like RedHat, Mandriva, CentOS and so on, at the time was launched, and do the specific steps to setup and you are good to go.

I bet if Affinity releases the apps under one or few specific distros, we'll jump to one of those and do our jobs happily.

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