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Affinity products for Linux

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-- Edited --- (by me, SrPx)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Maybe Photo or Designer wouldn't move the linux world, but imagine an integrated system with distributed asset management on a server or NAS.  Lightroom doesn't play well with network drives.    

 

Another opportunity is integrated software plus hardware on a low cost tablet.  

 

 

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So I have seen this same discussion on Adobe forums with much the same view point. 

 

Bit of background on me as a kid I grew up in a third world country. So inherently until I was a teenager I used Windows. I then started my own company in IT support and began exploring Linux for many years. Over these years I have contributed to many home users and business users convert to Linux. 

 

Just so you are aware I worked at Apple here in the UK when I first immigrated. So I have first hand knowledge of the company and some of it's inner workings.

 

Now to my point I now run a cyber security and web development company with a focus on security using open source software.

 

The only reason I can never convince a customer to abandon Windows or Mac is Adobe Photoshop and illustrator when they are designers etc almost every piece of software out there has an alternative and if they don't there is usually a cloud based solution.

 

Da Vinci Resolve by Blackmagic is changing video post production now offering Linux available only on two systems and it doesn't work properly without hardware add ons go look at how popular they are.

 

Adobe has down right refused to do the same you could be the game changer for design. 

 

I know I would be willing to pay a 500 pounds each if this software would run on Linux.

 

I know there are many people out there who want change it's time you listen if you support Linux you support 500 + distributions do you have any idea how many people that is.

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-- Edited --- (by me, SrPx)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Some people confuse listening with agreeing, I suppose.

Best regards!


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1 hour ago, Dark Shadow said:

So I have seen this same discussion on Adobe forums with much the same view point.

 

Generally, if 99% of people are in agreement, it is true.

 

1 hour ago, Dark Shadow said:

I know I would be willing to pay a 500 pounds each if this software would run on Linux.

 

That makes one sale, maybe two. The culture of Linux seems more about getting something for nothing, rather than paying. There are a number of users here who seem to expect Affinity to be full Photoshop, but on the cheap. My opinion would be that Serif's main market is the millions of keen amateurs who want to improve their smartphone pictures. Not the high end professional users who need Photoshop, Lightroom etc. I think Serif will probably get there in time, but not for a while.

 

So how many enthusiast users would spend £500 pounds ?

 

How would you solve printer drivers, icc profiles, raw converters, lenses, green screen software, specialist silk screen separation software DAM software and the fact Linux is so user unfriendly ? And by user friendly I mean being able to go into a retail shop like PC World (UK) and buy a laptop with Linux on it. And, just as importantly, take it back when it goes wrong. 

 

I still think Linux is for geeks who like to spend more time playing with the operating system than using the computer to do stuff. Mostly !  Otherwise why go on about it so much ?

 

I know I have spent more far time playing with Linux than I ever have using a Linux based computer to produce anything.

 

If you are really serious about a quality editor on Linux, why not pay the writers of Gimp £500 to improve their software? Get are few thousand Linux users to do that and there you are. You won't need to try so hard to convince them and they are already two thirds of the way there. Maybe more.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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I have to agree with you there. I have Linux Mint on my desktop and it has been a pain. You will definitely need to frequent the Mint Forums to get help doing things. I have been pretty lucky with getting answers to my problems that work but some users are less then friendly to newbies. My last problem was getting Mint to recognize my on-board audio so I could use my Bose speakers. The only thing it would play through was my monitor speakers. The answer was to go into the audio folder and delete everything. Sounded crazy but it worked.

Getting programs installed can be another crazy adventure. While there are easy options not all companies will put out a easy install version. I downloaded my Samsung printer drivers for Linux but still haven't figured out how to install it.

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9 hours ago, InfoCentral said:

You will definitely need to frequent the Mint Forums to get help doing things. I have been pretty lucky with getting answers to my problems that work but some users are less then friendly to newbies. My last problem was getting Mint to recognize my on-board audio so I could use my Bose speakers.

 

The question always is, if your Linux PC doesn't work, how do you go online to ask for help? Every Linux PC needs a Windows PC for support purposes, which is hardly user friendly. And or course, if you already own a PC, why not just use that? This situation is not perfect either with a Mac (in the UK) but of course there are loads of retail PC shops.

 

I recently tried to install Mint on two different PCs and it would not work with nvidea graphics cards. Hardly an uncommon card. I had to use my Windows PC and download two or three different distros before I found one that would work. 

 

I have two different Photo type printers. A Canon A3 plus and a dye-sub. Neither work under Linux. 

 

I actually think Serif would be far better off making an Android version. Someone willing to pay hundreds on a phone is far more likely to buy an editing program than someone who wants something for nothing. And when it comes to user base, Android trumps Linux many times over.

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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-- Edited --- (by me, SrPx)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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-- Edited --- (by me, SrPx)


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Many companies believe the reasons why Linux users choose Linux instead of OSX (or even Windows) is because it's free and doesn't want to spend money on operating systems nor software.

But the reason can also be to get an stable open source system, non monopolistic and able to work in any computer.

 

Happily more clever companies do produce software for Linux (and Unix).  Products such as Siemens NX, Catia, Nuke and many other very specialized and expensive ones work perfectly well with Linux and their users prefer that OS.

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On 01/03/2018 at 8:20 PM, skan said:

Happily more clever companies do produce software for Linux (and Unix).  Products such as Siemens NX, Catia, Nuke and many other very specialized and expensive ones work perfectly well with Linux and their users prefer that OS.

Not "more clever" but simply companies dealing with a very different user base.  The examples you cite all need to fit into a company's existing IT infrastructure, so it makes commercial sense to develop and support a Linux version - the customer is prepared to pay for it!


AP user, running Win10

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On 01/03/2018 at 0:20 PM, skan said:

able to work in any computer.

 

Happily more clever companies do produce software for Linux (and Unix).  Products such as Siemens NX, Catia, Nuke and many other very specialized and expensive ones work perfectly well with Linux and their users prefer that OS.

 

"able to work in any computer."  Wouldn't work on the last two computers I tried. (Mint). 

 

And define "work". Sure, the OS may work but it will not run useful software like Microsoft Office (well, let's say compatible) Adobe, Quark or Affinity. If might work for geeks but it certainly doesn't work for Joe Public and Mrs average user. So it doesn't work. In ten+ years I've only ever found it useful for internet browsing.

 

"More Clever Companies". If "clever companies are the ones that make lots of money, Microsoft, Apple, Adobe and Quark are quite clever. And they don't use Linux. Funny that !

 

All Linux users talk about how much better their OS is. But "normal" people buy computers not to fiddle about with the OS but to run good software, like Affinity or Adobe. So ultimately, Windows or MacOS is much better that Linux.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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1 hour ago, toltec said:

All Linux users talk about how much better their OS is.

That is neither fair nor accurate. But what they rarely talk about is how large the potential Linux market actually is for apps like the Affinity (or Adobe) ones. When they do, it tends to be based more on wishful thinking than anything else, a sort of naive "if you build it they will come" faith that there are droves of users out there somewhere who would happily pay up to 5 or 6 times the price of the Mac or Windows versions.

 

I can only speak for myself, but it is hard to take that sort of thing seriously.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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1 minute ago, R C-R said:

That is neither fair nor accurate.

 

Well, mostly they talk about how much better Linux is.

 

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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9 hours ago, R C-R said:

a sort of naive "if you build it they will come" faith 

I like that idea - Cargo Cult software!


AP user, running Win10

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16 hours ago, R C-R said:

it tends to be based more on wishful thinking than anything else

Not entirely true. When NetBooks first came out they ran on Linux. After they started selling like hot cakes because they were so cheap MicroSoft got very worried that would permanently loose market share once people saw how easy it was to use. MicroSoft then approached NetBook manufacturers with an offer to reduce the price of Windows to a few bucks if they would put Windows on their NetBooks instead of Linux.

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2 hours ago, InfoCentral said:

Not entirely true. When NetBooks first came out they ran on Linux. After they started selling like hot cakes because they were so cheap MicroSoft got very worried that would permanently loose market share once people saw how easy it was to use. MicroSoft then approached NetBook manufacturers with an offer to reduce the price of Windows to a few bucks if they would put Windows on their NetBooks instead of Linux.

Interesting! But if they were selling like hot cakes with a free OS, why would the manufacturers change to one that cost them money?


AP user, running Win10

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2 hours ago, InfoCentral said:

Not entirely true. When NetBooks first came out they ran on Linux.

But how many do now? And how many of their owners would be interested in running graphics apps like Affinity's on them?


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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There is the Google Chromebook which runs Chrome OS (based on Linux) but Google seem very careful not to talk about the OS.

 

Not really sure where that fits in the equation.

 

Any Chromebook users out there?


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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24 minutes ago, toltec said:

Not really sure where that fits in the equation.

Both Chromebooks & Netbooks tend to have relatively low powered CPUs, smallish screens, & not much RAM. They do not seem well suited to running graphics apps like Affinity.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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46 minutes ago, R C-R said:

Both Chromebooks & Netbooks tend to have relatively low powered CPUs, smallish screens, & not much RAM. They do not seem well suited to running graphics apps like Affinity.

 

So, are they much less powerful or smaller than the iPad ?

 

Must admit I don't know much about the iPad.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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1 minute ago, toltec said:

 

So, are they much less powerful or smaller than the iPad ?

 

Yes, and hence our iPad spec minimum requirements as some are not up to it. Photo processing and the maths involved in Designer's complex vector fills require high spec hardware and OS optimization for graphics processing.


Patrick Connor
Serif (Europe) Ltd.

Latest releases on each platform 

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6 minutes ago, Patrick Connor said:

 

Yes, and hence our iPad spec minimum requirements as some are not up to it. Photo processing and the maths involved in Designer's complex vector fills require high spec hardware and OS optimization for graphics processing.

 

Ah. Well, personally, if I was a regular Linux user I would buy a Windows PC just so I could run Photo and/or Designer.

 

But that's just me. Some might disagree :D

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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6 minutes ago, Patrick Connor said:

Yes, and hence our iPad spec minimum requirements as some are not up to it.

Which is why my forum sig includes "AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)" The only iPad we own is an older one with an Apple A7 CPU, which is not powerful enough to support Affinity Photo. :(

 

I bought the app at the discounted introductory price ($20, I think) on the theory that eventually I would probably buy an iPad Pro & Apple Pencil (which only works with the Pro models). Currently, that would cost about $900 or more, a bit hard to justify given my primitive drawing skills. Such is life, I guess.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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