corsseir

Affinity products for Linux

170 posts in this topic

@BLACK_IERAX

Well the bottom line is, it would be a tricky investment for Affinity to have their products available for Linux. Even though so many people do use it, it is not as well known. Very recently, there was a bug in the new Mac OS X High Sierra that caused trouble for Affinity to launch their betas. God forbid, if there is an issue in an operating system that does not have a support team, how can Affinity work around that as a professional business? Taking your computer to a technician would not resolve getting software installed that does not support the compatibility.

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On 01/10/2017 at 1:32 PM, corsseir said:

Linux is more popular on the desktop than macOS now - https://netmarketshare.com/ -> Desktop Trend (6.91%). NetMarketShare is a company which is sponsored by Microsoft, so I believe that their data is reliable enough. Taking statistics into account, what would be your response about Linux version of Affinity Photo and Designer?

Screenshot from 2017-10-01 14-42-27.png

 

They've said "The Linux share being reported is not correct. We are aware of the issue and are currently looking into it."


 

Marc

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18 minutes ago, BLACK_IERAX said:

Well according to the forum there are a total of

64,247
Total Members

Which represents only a fraction of the actual user base. I don't think Serif has released any numbers but sometime back, someone posted something about a local Nottingham newspaper article that IRRC said there were already 100K+ Mac users before the Windows apps were released ... & that may have been only for Affinity Designer for Mac, but I am not sure about that.

 

If you are going to argue in favor of Linux versions, it would be advisable to avoid basing anything on dubious assumptions, particularly about very large numbers of people, most of whom you know little or nothing about.


Affinity Photo 1.6.6; Affinity Designer 1.6.0; AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)

macOS High Sierra 10.13.2; iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM 

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Linux users also like to think they are virus free but there are viruses. There was a bad one reported recently that affected Linux and Android 6. Forgot the name. And of course there are all those home devices and hubs that run Linux and get cracked.

 

We all know that PCs are a pain but at least there is plenty of good, professional A-V software like Bitdefender or Kaspersky. In 30 years I've never had a problem I just keep my anti-virus software up to date.

 

If Linux ran airlines it would be a budget choice.

 

You could fly across the Atlantic on a scheduled Airline on a Jumbo Jet or an Airbus for a "reasonable" price, or you could go for free by Linux Airlines. The plane would be made by anonymous groups of people working in their bedrooms using secondhand parts. There may or may not be a qualified pilot, but someone would turn up, eventually. You would have to load your own luggage into the hold and cook you own meals. It would fly sometime next week. Probably.

 

Tough call ;)

 

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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3 hours ago, VectorVonDoom said:

They've said "The Linux share being reported is not correct. We are aware of the issue and are currently looking into it."

This is one of several articles explaining why the numbers from NetMarketShare & StatCounter (among others) should not be trusted. At best, these things represent a limited sample of all desktop computer users, plus some guesswork about how to interpret the data.


Affinity Photo 1.6.6; Affinity Designer 1.6.0; AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)

macOS High Sierra 10.13.2; iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM 

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hi there. not a reply. impressed with all the info i have learned, thank you.

but as a practical curious guy can we try affinity designer in Linux via wine?

..did anyone managed to put it to work?  is it possible?..please how to?...

 

thank you

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On 21.10.2017 at 2:01 PM, dionisio said:

hi there. not a reply. impressed with all the info i have learned, thank you.

but as a practical curious guy can we try affinity designer in Linux via wine?

..did anyone managed to put it to work?  is it possible?..please how to?...

 

thank you

I tried to install Affinity Designer using Wine devel. Installer crashes.

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1 hour ago, moonjasper said:

I tried to install Affinity Designer using Wine devel. Installer crashes.

 

This is a perfect example of why Affinity should never get involved with Linux and is exactly what I found when I tried Linux.

 

Who do you ask when something doesn't work?

 

It is an unsupported installation so nothing to do with Serif.

No Linux developer(?) is going to help.

Wine won't help.

 

You are on your own !

 

If you had a PC you could find loads of people to help, even Microsoft (well, maybe not Microsoft)

Or ask Serif.

 

Serif (or any software company) couldn't help unless they have the exact same version of Linux as you.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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Chicken or the egg? 

 

The comments against linux testify to ignorance. What are you afraid of?

 

Linux users are contrary to popular prejudices quite willing to pay for high-quality software. But therefore it has to be offered for that platform first.

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1 hour ago, minc said:

The comments against linux testify to ignorance. What are you afraid of?

 

Linux users are contrary to popular prejudices quite willing to pay for high-quality software. But therefore it has to be offered for that platform first.

Some Linux users will pay, but how many?  I know people who'll happily pay top dollar for Windows & OSX s/w but are almost offended by the idea of paying for something that runs on Android, Linux or iOS.  It's not ignorance, it's commercial pragmatism!


AP user, running Win10

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5 hours ago, minc said:

Chicken or the egg? 

 

The comments against linux testify to ignorance. What are you afraid of?

 

Linux users are contrary to popular prejudices quite willing to pay for high-quality software. But therefore it has to be offered for that platform first.

 

Really ? ;)

 

I am not afraid of it and I am certainly not ignorant of it, I have Mint on one of my machines (I even use it occasionally), my daughter uses a Linux laptop that I set up for her a couple of years back. I have also installed it on two machines for friends. One with Mint and one with Ubuntu (Mint wouldn't work).

 

I tried to use Linux commercially about ten years back (Print trade) and came to the conclusion it was a total waste of time for anything except amateur use. Even that was far from perfect because I never managed to get printer drivers that worked for either of my three A3 printers. Lot's of other things just not available. Both the recent machines I installed it on had issues with the NVidea cards (hardly rare) hence the switch to Ubuntu. I did try a couple of other Linux versions, they didn't work at all. Constantly trying different Linux versions seems to be the answer. WHAT A WASTE OF TIME !!!  

 

I would not consider that ignorance or fear of it. On the other hand, Linux users seem to be totally ignorant of commercial requirements, both for software companies and professional users. Serif are brave for a small company to develop both Mac and PC versions and you can see that they are at capacity. Lots of features people want that Serif can't deliver as soon as they want. And imagine the licensing issues for professional software that uses activation.

 

Speaking from personal and extensive experience over a ten year period, Linux is of no use to a professional, if a professional has time to play around with Linux, their business is struggling. They should be making money!

 

The question with Linux always is, where do you go for help? 

 

As for Moonjasper's problem. Can you help him or advise where he can go to get his problem fixed ? If not, you have proved my point. Not everybody is technically capable enough to keep fiddling with Linux. No professional will want to waste the time.

 

My advice to Moonjasper would be "buy a PC". I know that is good advice (at least it will work) ! If anybody just wanted to browse the internet on the cheap, using an older machine, I would advise them to install Linux. 

 

p.s. "Linux users are contrary to popular prejudices quite willing to pay for high-quality software".  

 

A user base of people who use free operating systems on second hand computers does rather cast doubt on that statement. ;)

 

 

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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On 11/9/2017 at 2:38 PM, toltec said:

Speaking from personal and extensive experience over a ten year period, Linux is of no use to a professional, if a professional has time to play around with Linux, their business is struggling. They should be making money!

 

The question with Linux always is, where do you go for help? 

 

p.s. "Linux users are contrary to popular prejudices quite willing to pay for high-quality software".  

 

A user base of people who use free operating systems on second hand computers does rather cast doubt on that statement. ;)


Linux is not for somebody who wants an "out-of-the-box" MacOS experience. This is for advanced users which know what they're doing. @toltec your statement/argument that "you have nobody to go to for help in Linux" is absolute rubbish. Depending on the distribution you have you can go to multiple places and ask for help which I have also done in the past for complex issues I couldn't figure out on my own. You can always ask a question on https://unix.stackexchange.com/, you have official blogs/forums for all of the big distributions and so on. Yes, there are no physical shops you can physically go to but there are plenty of places to ask for help online.

 

"Linux users are contrary to popular prejudices quite willing to pay for high-quality software" - correct

I have paid for all of the software/tools I'm using under Linux for development. This pretty much includes almost all of the IDEs of JetBrain which cost around 30euros/monthly.  Also, I currently own a few computers the weakest of which is i7-7560U with 16gb ram, Samsng SSD Evo Pro and Nvidia GTX 950. I have also been running OpenSUSE for 4 years now and previously was using Slackware for 6 more. Using Linux was something I started doing because I simply hate every aspect of Windows. It's crappy, it f*cks up a lot of things and I need to regularly re-install it every 6 months because I am doing rapid development. Linux provides me with a stable environment (and p.s. I also have a scanner and a printer, which are running perfectly fine!) in which I'm able to do my work just fine. 

 

"A user base of people who use free operating systems on second hand computers does rather cast doubt on that statement" - wrong. 

How exactly do you know how many people are using "second hand" computers with Linux? I know a lot of people using second hand PC's with Windows, does that make Windows a non-desirable market? I also know a lot of people using second hand Macs, but I don't see a lack of support for MacOS? Also, using a second hand computer doesn't mean anything - I've had a few myself on which I have installed paid software. This argument is poor.

 

-----------------------------------

 

By the way, I'm not sure if you know, but many games are now being actively developed for Windows, MacOS and Linux as well. I'm talking about games in Steam such as Counter-Strike, Civilization, Metro 2033, XCOM 2 and Outlast to name just a few of the big ones. So, if game studios are now including Linux as a target when releasing their games, what seems to be the "big" issue with having graphical software doing the same? I would be more than willing to pay for the software if it delivers good results. Furthermore, with the upcoming Vulkan API things should become dramatically easier to be done as the API itself is cross-platform. 

 

I actually saw your ad in facebook which said that Affinity was for MacOS, Windows and Linux and was really excited! Shortly after I got quite disappointed to see that this wasn't actually the case. If you ever decide to release a Linux version - count me in and please DO email me!

 

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8 hours ago, tftd said:


Linux is not for somebody who wants an "out-of-the-box" MacOS experience. This is for advanced users which know what they're doing. @toltec your statement/argument that "you have nobody to go to for help in Linux" is absolute rubbish. Depending on the distribution you have you can go to multiple places and ask for help which I have also done in the past for complex issues I couldn't figure out on my own. You can always ask a question on https://unix.stackexchange.com/, you have official blogs/forums for all of the big distributions and so on. Yes, there are no physical shops you can physically go to but there are plenty of places to ask for help online.

 

 

"This is for advanced users which know what they're doing"

 

Exactly. Nobody can use Linux unless they are willing to become an expert in Linux. That means an amateur, or enthusiast. A professional wants to use a computer to make money not play with it.

 

For example, do you own a car? Are you capable of fixing every single thing that goes wrong and did you install the engine and spray the car yourself? If a taxi driver's car breaks down, does he try and fix it himself? Does he change the tires every time they get worn?

 

And your example to sort out complex issues would not work if your only Linux machine does not connect to the internet. You need a second machine to browse the internet to fix the first machine. If the taxi driver lives 200 miles from the parts supplier, how does he drive there to buy the new transmission part?

 

By nobody to go to, I thought I made it clear that I meant nobody to go to. Your suggestion is that you spend hours fixing it yourself. That is unprofessional. You should be earning money, not playing around with one of the tools of your trade.

 

That is not the same as getting someone to fix it. Which is what 99% of professional users would do.

 

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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On 11/11/2017 at 2:36 AM, tftd said:

Depending on the distribution you have you can go to multiple places and ask for help which I have also done in the past for complex issues I couldn't figure out on my own.

Yes, you can ask, and I've had great support that way, but it's not consistent.  In a commercial situation I need and expect someone to be tasked with ensuring that my problem is resolved.  


AP user, running Win10

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Just want to add my 2 cents.


I've been using linux for at least 10 years. I can't recall any moment where I would end up with any kind of  "complex" problem in recent years. There used to be issues 10 years ago, but linux desktop have come a long way. Today, most of hardware is supported out of box and the probability of having the wrong one is really low. More than that I have an experience of buying a ssd that didn't work in macOS, but did in linux on the same macbook pro. These things about non working hardware and problematic setup are more of a myth nowadays.

 

Another myth is non paying linux user. I have more than 200 games on steam. No, it's not just indie games, but mostly AAA titles. I have macbook pro and want to buy another one. I have 2 legal copies of Win 10 Pro in my main desktop (one is just for games and the other is unused as I cba rebooting only for PS). It's not about not having money for windows lol. It's about workflow and tools. I'm stuck with using Photoshop and Illustrator CC in wine (same on mac for now). My SO is in simillar situation (except on windows as she's not developer, but designer only).

 

I'd like to escape from adobe and find a suitable solution. Affinity package seems to be the one. They don't have to support every distribution, one is pretty sufficient. When they release ubuntu version, every other distro can repack it. Or even easier approach is to release an appimage which is supported by every distribution I believe. That would prevent getting into dependency hell. Web developers and designers would appreciate such tool. We want to pay and we will pay if there's an opportunity.

Or you could make it easy to run in wine if there's no other option. I know it's hard, but comon if the PS can run pretty solid why Affinity wouldn't.

I want to buy your apps (and probably will anyway), but (at least) I want you to know that I want them on linux. 

 

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Well I literally just registered on this forum after reading some of the views of what Linux is used for (web browsing lol) and also how it is run on second hand computers (again lol) and how there is no-one to support linux machines (again again lol) and also how your company believes that linux is a budget option ...omg!

Do you know how many professional businesses use linux? Military Groups? Public services? 

Do you also realise that the majority of linux users (which you seem to call nerds..rude!) are far more technically minded than most of the users on other OS's.

Why not go out and buy a PC? You say. A PC is a personal computer which can have whatever OS you choose to have on it actually... so as a debian user I do have a PC.

Second hand computers run linux? This just makes me cringe! My laptop which I run a customised debian distro has a intel i7 3k CPU, 16GB DDR4, 2GB Dedicated Graphics, 1TB SSD (running /home), 128gb m.Sata (running the OS) along with a 2 Wifi Cards, a 4g sim Module and another 256GB USB 3.0 for addition storage. Not all linux users run rasberian/mint or ubuntu.

 

I researched your software hoping that finally there would be some software company out there making a decent photo editing suite for linux and stumbled upon this nonsense.

Instead of trying to compete with photoshop (which you do seem to do a good job at doing btw) on windows and mac operating systems why not actually create something that has no competition and would be appreciated by a group of computer enthusiast. You mention support but us linux users support each other so actually it wouldn't really need much support lets be real.

 

Anyway clearly at the moment, even though points have been made and even though the linux communities are growing rapidly you are just not interested.

But what I am going to do is make it my mission for the day to find a way of installing your software and successfully running on linux one way or another, even if I have to manually install it into wine as your install breaks. So the fun begins.

 

and this:

Quote

Speaking from personal and extensive experience over a ten year period, Linux is of no use to a professional, if a professional has time to play around with Linux, their business is struggling. They should be making money!

    

The fact you believe this just makes you a fool. A professional doesn't have to play around with linux, a true professional would know how to install almost all linux distributions on any machine and not need to keep changing distro's hoping for the best. Honestly, just because you have installed a few distros this does not make you a professional at all. A true business man does business but as an acting CEO and CTO of an international multi million pound company, I can tell you now your talking out of your rear. 

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2 hours ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

 

and this:

  Quote

Speaking from personal and extensive experience over a ten year period, Linux is of no use to a professional, if a professional has time to play around with Linux, their business is struggling. They should be making money!

Quote

    

The fact you believe this just makes you a fool. A professional doesn't have to play around with linux, a true professional would know how to install almost all linux distributions on any machine and not need to keep changing distro's hoping for the best. Honestly, just because you have installed a few distros this does not make you a professional at all. A true business man does business but as an acting CEO and CTO of an international multi million pound company, I can tell you now your talking out of your rear. 

 

 

So, what you are saying is

 

A professional photographer has to know how to install and maintain all Linux distributions

A professional printer has to know how to install and maintain all Linux distributions

A professional graphic artist has to know how to install and maintain all Linux distributions

 

Or did you not understand what I said ?

 

Should I use smaller letters ;)

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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30 minutes ago, toltec said:
  Quote

Speaking from personal and extensive experience over a ten year period, Linux is of no use to a professional, if a professional has time to play around with Linux, their business is struggling. They should be making money!

 

 

So, what you are saying is

 

A professional photographer has to know how to install and maintain all Linux distributions

A professional printer has to know how to install and maintain all Linux distributions

A professional graphic artist has to know how to install and maintain all Linux distributions

 

Or did you not understand what I said ?

 

Should I use smaller letters ;)

 

 

No i understand what you are saying. But you did not specify what profession. Linux is no use to a professional is a pathetic comment, simple. 

You continue to believe your shiny little apple logo makes you a pro in all areas that is fine with me. But I know many professionals in all areas that use linux and infact most of the true linux users are professionals in their own profession.

 

Do you understand what I am saying?

Or should i use bigger letters?

 

At the end of the day, linux is a much more professional operating system than you seem to understand.. yeah you have touched it but your not a linux user so i don't really know why you bother to argue something you know very little about.

 

I am disappointed there will not be a linux version available as linux users do require a better photo editing suite, simple.

But it seems like it will not be done so </conversation> 

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45 minutes ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

 

No i understand what you are saying. But you did not specify what profession. Linux is no use to a professional is a pathetic comment, simple. 

You continue to believe your shiny little apple logo makes you a pro in all areas that is fine with me. But I know many professionals in all areas that use linux and infact most of the true linux users are professionals in their own profession.

 

Do you understand what I am saying?

Or should i use bigger letters?

 

I don't have an Apple any more (retired last year).  I have a few PCs (Windows 7 and 10) and a couple of Linux machines (Mint and Ubuntu).

 

I spent over 30 years as a full time professional in the print, pre-press and photographic trades, using Acorns, Macs and PCs, mostly for editing photographs and creating press ready artwork, film and printing plates. Using drum scanners, flatbed scanners, imagesetters  proofing presses and digital presses. I can also operate a litho press.

 

My considered (and professional) opinion that Linux is of no use to a professional (in any of those trades). I would suggest that I am not alone as, as far as I know, none of my fellow professionals use Linux either. 

 

What is your experience in those trades. Are you, or have you ever, been employed in any of those trades?

 

Or are you just talking based on a theory ?

 

Don't use bigger letters, I lost my dictionary. :o

 

p.s. I still don't think Linux is of use to a professional. For 99.99% of users, in order to use Linux professionally, you have to become an expert in Linux. That is unprofessional. A PC should be a tool of your trade, not an occupation. I am entitled to my opinion (it is based on years of experience), you are entitled to disagree but there is no need to be rude and start calling names. That is childish!

 

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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1 hour ago, toltec said:

 

I don't have an Apple any more (retired last year).  I have a few PCs (Windows 7 and 10) and a couple of Linux machines (Mint and Ubuntu).

 

I spent over 30 years as a full time professional in the print, pre-press and photographic trades, using Acorns, Macs and PCs, mostly for editing photographs and creating press ready artwork, film and printing plates. Using drum scanners, flatbed scanners, imagesetters  proofing presses and digital presses. I can also operate a litho press.

 

My considered (and professional) opinion that Linux is of no use to a professional (in any of those trades). I would suggest that I am not alone as, as far as I know, none of my fellow professionals use Linux either. 

 

What is your experience in those trades. Are you, or have you ever, been employed in any of those trades?

 

Or are you just talking based on a theory ?

 

Don't use bigger letters, I lost my dictionary. :o

 

p.s. I still don't think Linux is of use to a professional. For 99.99% of users, in order to use Linux professionally, you have to become an expert in Linux. That is unprofessional. A PC should be a tool of your trade, not an occupation. I am entitled to my opinion (it is based on years of experience), you are entitled to disagree but there is no need to be rude and start calling names. That is childish!

 

 

 

Firstly, I have never called you a name not even by your username. Secondly, you are entitled to your opinion correct.

You keep saying a professional but a professional could be a professional in whatever profession they choose. A simple example of where linux thrives in a professional environment is in web hosting and security.

 

Anyway I haven't got the time to argue with you on this, you have made your point and I have made mine but does it change anything??? No 

So farewell & enjoy your OS of choice.  

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2 hours ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

 

Firstly, I have never called you a name not even by your username.

 

When you quote what I say and say this.

 

7 hours ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

The fact you believe this just makes you a fool.

 

I can tell you now your talking out of your rear. 

 

You are referring to me. Be a man and own up.

 

4 hours ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

so i don't really know why you bother to argue something you know very little about.

 

I assume that as you didn't answer my polite question about your professional experience in the graphics art field. In fact, you have no professional experience.

 

So, why are you arguing about "something you know very little about".

 

2 hours ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

So farewell & enjoy your OS of choice.  

 

Thank you. For what it is worth, my OS of choice would be Linux. I am about to install it on a laptop for browsing. But it is unprofessional so it is not much use for anything else. It's nice to play with though.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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You really do not give up. Opinionated, without an open mind.

Continue to believe in your own words and yes I do have experience within the photography industry, design & development.

This software will not be used by me so this whole debate is pointless and yes a comment like that is a comment of a fool, if the cap fits.... 

nJoy

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1 hour ago, Leo Mikaelson said:

You really do not give up.

No offense intended, but you also seem to be unwilling to give up. The developers have made it clear that at least for now they have no interest in developing Linux versions of the Affinity apps. Three pages of user comments debating the pros & cons of doing that have not changed anything: it still boils down to the relative market demand for new Linux versions vs. for improvements to the existing versions & for the development & release of the other Affinity apps for the three platforms they currently support.

 

Determining that market demand must be based not on how many Linux users there are or how good an OS it is, but on how many of them are doing the kind of work that would be likely to motivate them to buy Linux versions to do that work vs. the same thing for Windows & Apple users. The rest of it does not matter.


Affinity Photo 1.6.6; Affinity Designer 1.6.0; AP for iPad 1.6.2 (but no supported iPad -- yet!)

macOS High Sierra 10.13.2; iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM 

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Edited: Was extremely long....

 

Instead, one main point : Linux s a very professional system for many areas (servers and general network, programming, hosting, etc) . But it lacks quite in the graphic area, in almost every field. (making brilliant exceptions here with Blender and Krita ). Is not simply the raster editor what it lacks... . In that, and in the way it has to set your color calibration for the system. So, I think there's still a road to walk to get really pro (for graphics editing and creation),. And I know too there are some good video editors, etc. But the whole thing must be round, cover the most scenarios possible (specially for freelancers).

Leo Mikaelson likes this

Freelance Illustrator, comic artist, graphic designer, 3D modeler, animator (2D/3D), texturer, graphics UI specialist, web designer (+ html/css), oil painter, pixel artist.

Intel Core i7 860 2.8GHz stock, 3.46GHz turbo (4C, 8T), 8 GB RAM, GTX 275 1GB, HD Seagate Barracuda 7200 rpm, 32MB, 3GB/s, Intuos Pro 4 XL, NEC SpectraView 231 23", i1 Display Pro.

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bits. Affinity Designer license.

Official important stuff for Windows install and Aero. |  My Aero tips. |  Old inking trick/tutorial, ported from its usage in older applications.

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8 minutes ago, SrPx said:

Linux s a very professional system for many areas (serves and general network, programming, hosting, etc) . 

 

How can you say that ?

 

What is professional about a system with dozens of different distros written by amateurs?

 

It is not professional because you can't buy it off the shelf, can't contact the producers, can't take it to a repair shop, can't find training schools and can't buy professional software.

 

A business needs to buy the systems, buy the software, have it maintained/repaired, get staff trained to use it and get on with their own business (making money). You just can't do that with Linux. The only people who can really use it professionally are internet companies and so forth, but they have to employ a full time programmer to use it.

 

Don't get me wrong, I like Linux and hate Windows but as I said before, Linux is of no use to a professional. Well, unless you are a large company with a full time programmer on the payroll or unless you are a geek.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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