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Affinity products for Linux

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5 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

Probably, but Synfig is open source free software, right? Asking for paid software to move to Linux is different as the mind is not set you could get it free anyway.

Ah, a perfect snapshot of the mindset of an average Linux user.

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4 minutes ago, InfoCentral said:

Ah, a perfect snapshot of the mindset of an average Linux user.

Actually, perfect snapshot of the mindset of somebody claiming knows how a Linux user thinks.

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18 minutes ago, msdobrescu said:

Actually, perfect snapshot of the mindset of somebody claiming knows how a Linux user thinks.

I’m a Linux User (10 years), a Windows user, a MAC user, an Android user and I would tend to agree with @InfoCentral. The ‘typical’ Linux user (based on the ones I know) is proud of not paying for software. But this is counterproductive, because free software is nearly always inferior. Hence the “typical” Linux user we get on here asking for Affinity. But does that type of ‘typical’ customer base make a good market?

Anyway, be careful of what you wish for. If Serif did release Affinity for Linux and it became a huge success, before long others would follow, until eventually there might be a Microsoft Linux. No so far fetched, look at Apple.

Then before long it would just be another version of the mainstream OS types and would lose it’s independent appeal.

Like an unknown beach that suddenly gets known. Before too long there are multi-story hotels, paid for car parks, McDonalds, litter all over the place and binge drinkers.

 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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I am so sorry, then. I use them all, Windows, Linux, Unix, even some exotic ones. So, I am not typical - and I'm proud of it. I am not proud of not paying for it, I am grateful they are available, I've donated more to free software than I've paid on Windows and related software licenses. I just say, when you offer free software, you can't expect anymore to get paid for each copy. But when you sell as business model (as in Photoshop case) you will get paid even for a Linux version. Your market is different. I wouldn't say Linux products are inferior as a rule. Indeed, for photography and vector graphics there are few matches to the main products as Photoshop and Illustrator on any platform, they being industry standards. As fact, during my student years, I have paid for my linux distros at the time (Slack and Deb). There already is a Microsoft Linux, a server. But I would chose an open distro. As I've stated above, I try to avoid being so hard spied as on Windows and Mac OS. They spend too much on this so it becomes too costy for me to avoid it. I need a honest and plain environment that does the job, even flawed as you think Linux is. Something to offer me the windows and graphics, sound and image, no more, not even media indexing when not necessary. I know the danger is there, but I have lived well with Windows when it did not try so hard to gather all sorts of info on the user, I think Linux would be harder to be nailed down because it is open and thgere will always be people keeping it free of this stuff. This is why I don't rely on Android either. A big Pandora box it is.

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I don't say Linux is flawed. It is pretty good at what it does but it is very limited for professional use (outside of a very few pro uses). I do say the Linux market place is flawed, very flawed!

I was running a photo studio 10 years back and fancied trying Linux. No drivers for any of my 3 printers, no specialised plug-ins (green screen software) plus lots of similar problems. In fact I couldn't use it for anything except web browsing and a firewall. I even had help from a mate who was a Linux expert, but he couldn't write printer drivers or plug-ins, obviously.

As far as I can tell, it has not moved on in 10 years? I honestly don't think it will, unless Microsoft release Microsoft Linux. Then they will only wreck it.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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This is what I call a vicious circle. Linux is not taken into consideration by several market segments, so it can't be used by these professionals. The driver/hardware and software makers ignore it, the publishers and graphic creators have no choice but skipping it. They skip it, the driver/hardware and software makers say it is not an attractive niche and won't produce their stuff for it. And so on.

Linux moved a lot, in my experience. For a start, it became a reliable desktop, which was not that good 10 years ago.

There are things that started under Linux, like gimp's resyntesizer, which became the content aware technology in Photoshop.

Web hosting is better under Linux. As effect, web browsing is faster under Linux - looks like linux machines collaborate better in this reqard.

A paradox here is that software development looks better organized under linux, because the financial pressure does not exist. This makes things slower. Look at Java technologies, they were not a success from the financial point of view, so Sun disappeared, but there are so many firmwares relying on it! Microsoft's .net is a java clone that started as Windows desktop oriented technology, but slowly drops that, it becomes .net core, that is so close to java as I wonder why use it after all. Sometimes, it is enough to rename some objects in order to compile the same program under one or another of these technologies.

Yet, Linux it's a democratic platform, things go in the users advantage in time.

As software developer I saw people stating they wont use tools and technologies of some companies just because they ignore Linux, I hear that more and more often.
I remember Linus making git for Linux kernel development and one of the best graphical git managers are now under OSX and Windows only.

Why a company is so self confident in order to ignore all these requests? Do they think we will buy their software forever just because it's excellent?
I am sorry, but as long as I have, for example, Photoshop, under Windows or MacOS, I won't choose some othes company product just because I am used to Photoshop and I think it's that good as I won't skip it for less. That unless I have an advantage, like this, working under my OS of choice.

For me, the Linux stagnation is a pain due to its rejection by the commercial software companies. I don't buy their arguments, as you can see, although I understand the effort.
Still, years ago I have user VMS, where the application methodology was so close to OS X, as I hardly believe it is so complicated to be ported under.

And yes, I understand your pain too.

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Why a company is so self confident in order to ignore all these requests? Do they think we will buy their software forever just because it's excellent?

Why is it not allowed to ignore that? It is their call. Is not that even a moral matter here. By any stretch, indeed. You make the effort to build a company, and you get the right to make things as you prefer. It is indeed one of the main motivations instead of being yet another employee for whoever. It is your project. It is your baby. If you have worked as a freelancer or small business owner, you'll understand the point immediately. You think Linux is the best OS, but maybe give the freedom to others not to think that way ?

Edit: About apps excellence : Yep, that's a really good reason to use it, at least for a professional (hobbyists is a totally different matter, if I were just that, I'd probably be Linux-only)  no matter what the OS is. But also consider that if the OS -whoever the fault is that, what the user cares about (or should) is about the result- puts way too many obstacles in terms for compatibility, commercial grade software available, support in hardware (I know the vicious circle, since longer than most ppl think, but that's the situation, decades pass and it does not change, and we can't try to force a random company to take all the risks others should be taking)

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This is what I call a vicious circle. Linux is not taken into consideration by several market segments, so it can't be used by these professionals. The driver/hardware and software makers ignore it, the publishers and graphic creators have no choice but skipping it. They skip it, the driver/hardware and software makers say it is not an attractive niche and won't produce their stuff for it. And so on.

And why must a small company, that always needed to set prices low, that is clearly having human resources problems  (and that is often related to money, even if here also is the difficulty of finding an extremely advanced and specific profile: Is not just about finding a basic dot net coder) why it has to be the "hero" here and take all the risk that other agents actually morally obliged do not care to take, to do the work that is Linux community's at its whole (am also thinking on the extremely low donation level!! for the number of users there. Is crazy small compared to Windows', but crazily bigger than these  donations show) , and/or much bigger companies than Serif, linux based and even promoting Linux very strongly, which are basing amazing wealth and benefits by using OPEN SOURCE, linux based software! with a lot more money than Serif has (and you and me know there are a bunch like these) and which are actually in the moral debt to actually do this, or at least support a ton more a project like Gimp. But no... because Linux community, and its companies, have always cared a lot more about server/coding other things than in making professional grade graphic content creation applications. A lot of young linux users don't remember this, but I remember Linux since the start, and thus has been a constant.  Gimp's, Blender's (well, is less the case. that one has received the community support that all the others should have, with amazingly good results) , Inskcape's,  Scribus' and etc authors and developers are literally heroes, for the little help that they have had from their own "home", honestly. So, don't blame the neighbors, IMO. (bad example, I know, a neighbor must care about the people around, but u get the idea, I hope.... )

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I am sorry, but as long as I have, for example, Photoshop, under Windows or MacOS, I won't choose some othes company product just because I am used to Photoshop and I think it's that good as I won't skip it for less. 

Then...you are making a choice, here.  And you are free to do so. But consider that really supporting Linux means as well supporting its truly GPL compliant solutions, long time existing like Gimp, Inkscape and Scribus. Which, once again, are much, much better that most people (usually people that have not gone all the (painful, at commercial level, I know that really well) way to incorporate them in real life company's workflows. I have, and they serve, after some heavy workarounds. The same sacrifice that you make by been ready to use Affinity IF that's what it takes to stay in Linux, should be done towards Gimp, for similar reasons. So, if we are making decisions here for being more comfortable, we should not accuse a company for going where the only safe benefit "could" (even with Windows massive numbers, that's never guaranteed in the balance of income/expenses !) be.  Again, they have to pay a lot of salaries and enormous bills, plus, surely go with the decisions of the investors. It ain't ever that easy, never been so in 10 companies that I have worked at. I wish we lived in another world, of course.

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 because the financial pressure does not exist. This makes things slower. Look at Java technologies,

Slower is... "dead in the water", in business, full stop. Is not just , hey, look, we are slower, but we are fine. You can compensate a bit of slowing down in the apps, but if add problems already in the OS level....  You are fighting a ton of obstacles, already. Even in the best scenario, Windows/Mac and iOS, there are still a cr4p load of problems to get a positive balance.

Stupid anecdote that no one reads, from an old graphic worker, "spoilerized" :

 

That mention tho, brings me certain memories. I have ALWAYS (no one believes me that I am, even now... But I don't give a ....) been a Linux supporter. I worked at a crazily intensive environment once (done a lot of others, but that got the Guinness record). A company making game for arcade machines. (I got even dangerous blood pressure values, there, and other probs, when even I'm normally in super safe values, and a very calmed person. Later I developed a rhino skin against pressure, due to getting too much of that along the years, but even then I was able to take a lot of pressure, and very experienced already). It was all full of problems : Wrong implementation choice, bad timing planned in the contract, MANY other problems in the main contract (between company producer and client company, sth very usual in my region). One of the unavoidable requirements was to make it in Java AND under Linux, yes and yes. Linux choice, I could understand: They'd save a license per machine, and an enormous saving, even if bulk licensing or sth. But even then, there were pretty faster and more specific libraries and systems for that, under linux. Even if far from the performance in Windows, very far, but still, somewhat usable. I worked with some great friends there, and there was no way. These people were extremely talented,  both in Java programming and in Linux OS matters, but, while surely today this is no problem (compare the machines power, too, lol) , back then, and bigger than tiny resolutions you would not get higher than 4 fps,. NO MATTER WHAT YOU DID, with a 2D game using Java under Linux. Same code, ported (they developed in Linux, were linux souls, all hated Windows, or almost all) to Windows, which was not the original platform where they made the game, it literally flied, in comparison. I think it even got close to 60 fps, which was way more than enough for the product's purpose. But no way, as the contract was very strict: it had to be Java, under linux. It was a dead end, company was stalling. All income depended on that.  Dunno what happened (I left for a better route), I think they survived somehow with other product (but at certain point, they fully crashed), but that was the main bone of the company, so, surely the money people did some miracle to save the day. (probably also the ones signing the contract, as key problem is when you don't let the tech people to weigh in enough...have suffered that in my own). Every other library ( back in the day I think they'd have chosen SDL ) was also way slower than specific game libraries in Windows, but at least , as these devs were really good, they'd have managed, somehow.

People keep leaving these details aside, when these can end up in extreme tragedy, not only for the company, but in personal ones, people unemployed, etc. I decided to leave (in the anecdote inside the spoiler), as was really stalling (and my health, according to doctor. Never happened before or later, in 10 companies. Even when at a later one all people were Linux based, I handled the 2 systems (actually, the 3) and stayed there by many years. But the company understood really well what was Linux ready for, and what had Linux community provided as commercial grade software... and with some brilliant exception, it was not about graphic software, but yes of course, server stuff and etc. There were no Windows servers, there. And it was a very advanced tech start up, not a hosting company (can be very advanced, too, but is a very different business ) ).

You are not willing to use sth less comfortable than PS, if in Windows (you seem to be fine with the subscription). I understand it (I do , but, as I have been forced to use tons of UIs in my entire professional life, this is just one  more, which happens to follow the standards (not just in PS, corel, psp, etc...) a lot more than Gimp or others... and I was able to get used to Gimp for work, so......anyway, I love PS, too) . Perfectly correct. And a ton of ppl is not willing to use an OS that has too many things (hardware and software) unsupported or non compatible. No matter if they love the philosophy behind it ( I do, actually). Freedom of choice goes in many directions. And a company has to go where it gets the most benefit, or at least, enough benefit to stay alive. Not just for itself, but for its workers and families depending on that. And even if willing to ignore those, as a business owner, having to have made too many sacrifices (in effort, time and money), no one can tell you, in anyway, to take more risk than you should. IF.... a company is willing to help some good cause, by their own will, I'll applaud that, and probably help that company. But I don't think it is at the point that one can say they "should" make a Linux version. There is zero moral debt related to that.

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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You've got it wrong as I was unclear. I am talking generally, especially related to the big or successful companies that produce widely used hardware or even define the industries standards.

While there are companies ignoring Linux, there are ones at least sponsoring the support for Linux for their products, like HPLIP project, or ones that are major and produce themselves for Linux, like database servers from Oracle and Microsoft. But let's not blame Linux for @toltec's printers missing the support. Some tried but did it wrong. For instance Corel made PhotoPaint for linux and offered it for free. But they were well known for CorelDraw and that would have been a hit, and should have been offered for the same money as the other OS versions, or promoted when a license for Windows was sold, give the Linux one to try. Of course they could not do it alone, as in @toltec's case when the printers did not have a driver for Linux.

A friend of mine had a fridge to give. He advertised that and nobody was interested, thinking it is something wrong with it. So, he put a price and the next day somebody bought it.

What I don't understand is why you say Serif tries to build a company as long it is for decades on the market, as was stated here already. I am so sorry to tell this, but they state they have the knowledge to build for Linux too. I am sue they have the means also. It is simply their choice not to. I am not saying to come here and do what I say. They should listen to their community, though.

In this field, am a hobbyist now, I used to draw and sell photos in the past too, I've just changed my options, so I chose the tool to do the job better for me.

I've tried lots of software before, I am doing that now too. Under Linux, couldn't find commercial software as good as the free alternatives. I am sorry to name here, I have tried Corel AfterShot, but is not better than DarkTable or RawTherapee and others, sorry. Affinity Photo is, as far as it concerns me, so fast and natural even being at the beginning of its life. It could bypass Photoshop soon, but I am sure won't be as adopted because Photoshop is so long established in this area as the standard. It is surely a deserved place. It's hardly a choice, it's rather a necessity. I really want to have an alternative, and Affinity has all the chances here regarding the current approach, but needs to work more, of course, as it is young. I wish them to become as everybody expects it here.

So, the fact @SrPx you've stated so well, the general situation is the issue, not a specific  company support. I am just writing my opinion, I won't force anybody to produce for Linux, how would I?

As for the heroes, definitely those of Inkscape, Gimp, Scribus, Blender's are deserving Nobel price for peace at least! I have used those and still do, but I am also amazed by the Gimp's approach to be software developper's rather than photographer's - hence people looking for some other tool. Inkscape is great, for me it is a good replacement for Illustrator, but printing is so bound to its close format so would be hard for designers and publishers to beat that - as you know, some modern features of eps are not editable in Illustrator without its proprietary format embedded. Blended is known for being hard to learn - for me it is really unintuitive after modelling in Studio Max.

Anyway, I might have misunderstood, but your anecdote tells me how the wrong choice of tools ruins a project, not Linux itself. Linux is the kernel, missing the around stuff to make it a desktop environment is the problem. So we ask for that stuff everywhere. Not only here.

I chose Photoshop because I love ACR + content awareness. Not much, isn't it? Content awareness is under Gimp too, people are giving credit to Gimp's Resynthesizer (which is developed by e brilliant guy as a university project). But ACR is seamless. Affinity seems to be close of that too, still not there. As for the subscription, it's OK if you need people taking care of ideas rather of struggling for their day to day living. What I try to avoid is an OS that brings me needless privacy issues, like Windows, and probably more people might go away due to this reason, in time. I don't even know what data Windows collects, see?

Just think, I have a display calibration device, but has support for Windows and OSX only. Under Linux there is software supporting it. Many people do this way. It is possible. Why the calibration device company did not do a Linux driver and software from the start?

Also, TV tuners don't look a market that big compared to graphics and photography, still there are companies providing native support for a TV tuner.

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3 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

What I don't understand is why you say Serif tries to build a company as long it is for decades on the market, as was stated here already. I am so sorry to tell this, but they state they have the knowledge to build for Linux too. I am sue they have the means also. It is simply their choice not to. I am not saying to come here and do what I say. They should listen to their community, though.

Lots of companies have the ability, but why should they waste time on a poor, quirky loss-making market? Ask Corel about that one.

Serif's "community" is their existing customers, surely?. I think you will find that their "community" would prefer them to continue to improve the existing products rather than waste years developing a product that would almost certainly lose them money, just to please a few 'non-community' people who use Linux and regret it because their "community" has no decent software ;)

I agree, Serif should listen to "their community" :)

Of course, Serif have said many times they have no intention of developing a Linux version, and why. Maybe the Linux "community' should listen ?


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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3 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

They should listen to their community, though.

And they do!  But there's a big difference between listening and complying!  If you look at Serif over the past 10 years or so it's clear that their strategy has been to narrow their product offerings while introducing a broader platform support by including Macs (OSX and iOS).  I wasn't there, but I'd be stunned if the question of whether or not  to support Linux wasn't raised and answered back then.  It's been 4 years since the Affinity range was released, it's not complete, dates aren't being met, and plans for a DAM have been shelved - it looks like Serif 's plans are slipping.  Introducing a new platform now would be verging on suicidal!  

Back in the day I was watching stock prices fall while profits rose.  It was explained to me that business control is so critical that the markets would rather see a predicted loss than an unexpected gain - handing over control of corporate strategy to a small, if well intentioned, group of potential users is not the way to go!


AP user, running Win10

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Do I feel some frustration ? :) Well, not everybody, but part of Serif community started this topic. Or part of the community wanna-be's. Why not full members? Because they need this stuff on their platform and have no technical means to get it and they want to pay for it too.

So Serif should listen. Listening means not at all doing, just considering, IMHO. Probably they did already.

Do you try to blame Linux community for not having software they need, as long as there are good solutions for them functionally, but present on other platforms only? And when they come and ask them to come on theirs too, why do they meet people that upset on them for not having those? Help me understand, please.

Linux is for users just as any other OS, the users are the majority, not the developers. So the users have come to devs and ask for something. They have come to professionals, like Serif, not to free volunteers. They are willing pay for this service.

As Serif say they will not do it, it's OK,  but why third party people would come to say "no" in their place? Are they afraid of something? I don't get it.

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2 minutes ago, msdobrescu said:

....I don't get it.

I think they want our limited resources concentrating on what is important to them, in the same way as the pro-Linux people do here. That's why this is an impassioned conversation.


Patrick Connor
Serif (Europe) Ltd.

Latest releases on each platform 

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5 minutes ago, msdobrescu said:

As Serif say they will not do it, it's OK,  but why third party people would come to say "no" in their place?

No “third party people” are saying “no” on Serif’s behalf. We’re simply pointing out that Serif themselves have already said a firm “no” after carefully considering the idea.


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Affinity Designer/Photo/Publisher 1.7.3.481 • Windows 10 Home (4th gen Core i3 CPU)
Affinity Photo for iPad 1.7.3.155 • Designer for iPad 1.7.3.1 • iPadOS 13.3 (iPad Air 2)

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8 minutes ago, Patrick Connor said:

I think they want our limited resources concentrating on what is important to them, in the same way as the pro-Linux people do here. That's why this is an impassioned conversation.

Well, I hope you will do satisfy them as they are the ones that pay for your work and that makes your employees sustainable and happy.

I personally think it is good to have alternatives to the good products as Adobe's are, so we have more choices too.

Maybe, someday, Serif could afford to do the crazy thing and provide some of their great tools for Linux too ;).

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1 hour ago, msdobrescu said:

So Serif should listen. Listening means not at all doing, just considering, IMHO. Probably they did already.

There is no "probably" about it. They have replied multiple times in this now 20 page long topic, making it very clear why they are not considering developing Linux versions of the Affinity apps anytime soon. Ignoring that & continuing to post the same kind of comments they have already rejected as reasons why they should reconsider is like continuing to beat on a dead horse, hoping that will somehow bring it back to life.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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1 minute ago, msdobrescu said:

True, but this thread came back to life and I had to reply sometimes.

The only "life" this topic has had since page two or so is the hope that this utterly & completely deceased horse will somehow regain consciousness if enough people keep pounding on it.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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2 hours ago, msdobrescu said:

They are willing pay for this service.

Who is this "they" you are talking about.

So far about 20 or 30 people.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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1 minute ago, msdobrescu said:

Well, 2-3 are more than enough, you included :).

I'm not willing to pay for the Linux version. 

So down to 1 or 2 then :P


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Was writing a rather longer post... But I'll just say that I am way more hopeful about the old heroes, mostly because  the one with the UI you dislike, Blender (this is not going to be an argument in 2.8, they are providing a final solution (UIs for different levels for the learning curve), but it has improved already crazily), is a solid proof of what can be done when the community does what needs to be done about a software (much stronger donations, even massive, than seen in any other Linux graphic app, support, writing tuts, videos, help in forums, code (many linux users are excellent coders, as you know), do actual high end art to promote Blender, etc, etc), and there's really smart direction (Ton started it as a business! A business view is more important that a lot of people think. He's been there for all this time) with sponsors, funding, etc, etc. 2.8 version is going to be a true revolution. Not just another version, I follow it very closely. This is not a theory. I have produced very high end work with it, and a BSD licensed,  cross platform modeler, Wings 3D, is my main modeler (I import into Blender) . At this point I would not 3D model with any other thing, while I have been a pro worker with Max in 4 game companies (I would use again Max, Maya, ZB, etc, etc, when at a job, tho, if required. But been allowed often to use my tools of choice, if providing perfect integration)

Also, I do firmly believe Affinity is a much more serious option, it really is a threat for the top dog, it indeed is capable of taking the place of PS/AI for many fields. The first place, that's complex for the terrain advantage, specially with the pipelines installed in the companies, but give it time. A lot of people (I see that you don't) hate renting as a concept instead of purchasing. Plus, the approach of Affinity is fresh and nice, despite complaints, I have tested Affinity P. to be much more lightweight for hardware than the top dog (2018 trial version). So, I am both more hopeful about the two lines .  Affinity in one line, very advanced and practical, with less professional market holes than the linux options, and the arcane Linux graphic apps authors, the heroes. Just because I have seen my work  being able to get well done and covered (I recon with a ton of learning effort through years) and plate of food filled, with several of their apps. And actually worked with those at certain companies, too. I believe the same think can happen to Inskcape and Gimp. But IMO there a lot more funding to pay new developers is a total must. I mean full time developers. The ones there are doing it great, but are really few.

About your main Windows worry, the telemetry. We are giving up a lot of stuff with the Android phones, google, many services, public administration, police, and etc. And yeah, you can avoid it (the android thing, only), but other people will use it, your family, friends, etc. And will compromise your data at certain level sooner or later, as the other option is not interacting with anybody at all, and that's quite a high price for a worry. There are ways, a bit advanced for the majority, to minimize that, in Windows. Not to eliminate it fully, certainly. But MS looks at it as a whole beach filled with grains of sand. You are one grain in the mass. They make money with stats for companies and stuff,. but is not that much of a deal as a lot of people  make of it, IMO. I'm not happy about it, either, but as a profesional in graphics, there's to much to loose in a Linux migration (maybe that'll change in 10 years, but my problems are current, and this situation have lasted so many years...). Is all , not just Adobe or Affinity. Is specially bad if you cover a bunch of fields,  like my case, not only a specific one (ie photography).  The issues multiply by a nice factor. (maybe you cover a lot more, not asuming anything here  ;)  )

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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36 minutes ago, msdobrescu said:

 but I enjoy discussing this

I can understand that. You are a Linux user, you must be feeling a bit lonely and isolated xD


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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