Jump to content

Recommended Posts

20 minutes ago, toltec said:

Mind you, I had to photograph a model once wearing a blue and green dress. Spooky ! 

 

article-2141459-12FDF037000005DC-405_634x414.jpg


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.6.9.81 & Affinity Designer 1.6..2.24 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, toltec said:

 

Common usage, my dear chap

....

 

Mind you, I had to photograph a model once wearing a blue and green dress. Spooky ! 

 

Not common enough though - hence the original question:D  And dare I ask why you were wearing a blue and green dress?  That's a terrible colour combination! 


AP user, running Win10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Affinity needs to get involved in the Linux community for 3 reasons.

  1. As Microsoft, Apple, and Google tighten their monopoly, they become less innovative. Also they cost more (app wise), devour privacy, and become less secure. More and more people will be going to Linux in the future to escape the giant corporations increasingly toxic ecosystems.
  2.  Linux has had a long record of poor UI implementations. This is changing fast as they move to a culture of flat design principles and easy OS installations.
  3. Lack of any real challengers in Linux the environment will be very beneficial to Affinity. They have an opportunity to secure a dominance and solidify a future user base almost unchallenged.



In point I am considering the following:

Deepin Linux Distro

Easy to use beautiful looking lightweight OS with no spyware or data mining.

designerimage.png.abe1918bddc005221eb4dab3f29c2005.png


Gravit
Gorgeous looking vector design software already available on Linux

dd.png.4c6e2b9acd472bc6eb31cef475a3ca9a.png


Get into the Linux ecosystem now Affinity... while you still can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, cjfunited said:

I think Affinity needs to get involved in the Linux community for 3 reasons.

  1. As Microsoft, Apple, and Google tighten their monopoly, they become less innovative. Also they cost more (app wise), devour privacy, and become less secure. More and more people will be going to Linux in the future to escape the giant corporations increasingly toxic ecosystems.
  2.  Linux has had a long record of poor UI implementations. This is changing fast as they move to a culture of flat design principles and easy OS installations.
  3. Lack of any real challengers in Linux the environment will be very beneficial to Affinity. They have an opportunity to secure a dominance and solidify a future user base almost unchallenged.


Get into the Linux ecosystem now Affinity... while you still can.

 

The point is, Serif is a commercial company, they have to sell. How do you market to Linux users ?

 

Mac is  easy, the Mac Store, let Apple do it. Lots of outlets for PCs

 

As an example, why not try to get a petition going. Try and get a list of a few thousand Linux users who would be willing to buy Affinity Photo. Then come back.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, toltec said:

Try and get a list of a few thousand Linux users who would be willing to buy Affinity Photo. Then come back.


I think this would be doing the job of a paid market researcher. That said if it is about selling which is difficult to do in Linux as you said "app store", and that you can't guarantee the product will work across the many distro's. So....

Perhaps they can sell Affinity products with optional cross-platform at higher price tag . So instead of selling Windows Affinity for $100 they could sell it for $200 but give users access to Mac and Linux downloads.

I would be very happy to pay extra for a single purchase cross-platform product or extra for an upgrade option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, cjfunited said:


I think this would be doing the job of a paid market researcher. 

Aren't there forums for that sort of thing ? Do Linux users not use the Internet ;)

 

If not, it shows what an absolute disaster trying to sell a Linux version would be.

 

I have nothing against Linux, I have a PC running Mint but Linux is not a "professional" environment, or maybe that should be commercial ?

 

Yes, I know professionals use it to good effect but then the Hong Kong air traffic control used to run on BBC Micros. 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, cjfunited said:


Perhaps they can sell Affinity products with optional cross-platform at higher price tag . So instead of selling Windows Affinity for $100 they could sell it for $200 but give users access to Mac and Linux downloads.
 

 

But what is the point ?

 

You can buy a decent secondhand PC for that. The Linux machine is 99% likely to be secondhand anyway.

 

Running it on a PC gives access to all sorts of other things, like the NIK plugins.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cjfunited said:

I think this would be doing the job of a paid market researcher.

Are you suggesting that Serif does not do its own market research? I think that is very unlikely.

 

Your #1 reason does not appear to be based on any actual market research. In fact, it seems to be based on some broad & highly dubious assumptions, particularly about how much of the market will (when?) consider the "ecosystems" provided by Apple, Microsoft, etc. as "toxic," whatever that is supposed to mean.

 

3 hours ago, cjfunited said:

Perhaps they can sell Affinity products with optional cross-platform at higher price tag . So instead of selling Windows Affinity for $100 they could sell it for $200 but give users access to Mac and Linux downloads.

It has been mentioned countless times in these forums that the Mac versions are sold only through the Mac App Store ("MAS") & the Windows versions only through Serif's own store. For <ahem> security & privacy reasons, Apple does not share buyer information with MAS sellers, so as things stand now there is no way to sell a cross-platform license because Serif does not know who specifically is buying the Mac versions.

 

That could change, but it would mean developing new anti-piracy protections & update mechanisms for the Mac versions (because that is provided by Apple for all apps sold through MAS), which in turn would mean passing those development costs on to users, maintaining multiple versions of the Mac apps, & so on. So your guess about what this would cost could be much too low, in addition to lacking any market research about the potential demand for it.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.6.9.81 & Affinity Designer 1.6..2.24 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/10/2017 at 0:54 PM, R C-R said:

Are you suggesting that Serif does not do its own market research?

No, I was actually suggesting that Affinity would have done market research. But I am wondering whether their research was simply how many potential customers use Linux now, as opposed to say how many users are likely to use Linux in the future, and if it is more cost effective to secure dominance in its ecosystem now than compete for it later.

 

On 12/10/2017 at 0:54 PM, R C-R said:

Your #1 reason does not appear to be based on any actual market research.

Microsoft has proven many times that they cannot be trusted with user's privacy and because it has the lions share of the OS user base, it also means it is the predominate target for virus and security issues As for Apple I think they have done very well as opposed to Microsoft, yet Apple charges high premiums to be in their club. Not only that but Apple as far as I have used it, does not like playing with others. This is what I mean by toxic.

 

 

On 12/10/2017 at 0:54 PM, R C-R said:

In fact, it seems to be based on some broad & highly dubious assumptions

Competition drives innovation, so dominating companies tend to innovate less when unchallenged. Moreover innovation is finite, every year that passes Apple and Microsoft innovate less. That is not to say they don't make great strides every now and then, but I believe in the Desktop OS things have slowed down tremendously and this will allow the Linux distro's to catchup in form, functionality, and compatibility..

I think Linux will be a professional designer platform in the future. I hope Affinity is there for that because it is the only software I can't do without keeping me locked in to Windows... and I am tired of Windows, really really tired of setting privacy and security settings, firewalls, and constant harassments of its ad systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, cjfunited said:

I think Linux will be a professional designer platform in the future. I hope Affinity is there for that because it is the only software I can't do without keeping me locked in to Windows... and I am tired of Windows, really really tired of setting privacy and security settings, firewalls, and constant harassments of its ad systems.

 

I thought that 10 years ago, when I first became interested in it.

 

As far as I can see, it has got nowhere. There was Gimp, Inkscape and OpenOffice. 10 years later, it is pretty much the same.

 

I hate Windows too, especially Windows Gestapo 10, but at least there are great software companies like Serif, even Adobe.

 

Linux is an enthusiasts toy. Sadly :(


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, toltec said:

Linux is an enthusiasts toy.

I would never call Linux a toy, but it has a long way to go before it becomes a mainstream OS with one dominate distribution that 'out of he box' is as fully configured for graphics design work as Windows or the Mac OS. It is the near infinite ways it can be configured that appeals to enthusiasts, but perhaps ironically that is the same thing that keeps it from becoming mainstream.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.6.9.81 & Affinity Designer 1.6..2.24 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, R C-R said:

I would never call Linux a toy, 

Well, it's OK but that is what most people use it for.

 

 Take out internet use and servers and what good is it?

 

Are there any professional photographers or designers using it ?

 

I wish things were different, I hate Windows >:(


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While Linux is a nice thought, I'd be happier if those really smart Affinity folks just got on with heading towards version 2. Personal and totally biased view: this iPad version is a distraction. Come on chaps (and chapesses) -- let's see the next mega-revolution! You're already knocking at the gates. I want an innovative browser, a Lightroom RAW killer and other tweaks from double-click any slider to reset, to a macro system that knocks PS actions out of the park.

Go Team Affinity!!!


Dave Straker

Cameras: Sony A7R2, RX100V

Computers: Win10: Chillblast Photo with i7-3770 + 16Gb RAM + Philips 40in 4K; Surface Pro 4 i5

Favourite word: Aha. For me and for others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did go through a Linux phase a few years ago for a change, but I was never able to figure out how to set it up. It's not like Windows or Mac in which you can buy a new computer with the operating system already installed. It involves background learning just to get it going, and I thought it was not as well known, so I understand if Affinity doesn't make a version for it. It would be a risky investment.

 

@cjfunited, I saw Gravit Designer not so long ago. It reminded me so much of Designer with the interface and cat being advertised.

 

59e29d939de6b_ScreenShot2017-10-14at7_30_17PM.png.4053357e1528805642c78e3fcf51de38.png

 


The website is still a work in progress. The "Comics" and "Shop" sections are not yet ready. Feel free to connect with me and let me know what you like or what can be improved. You can contact me here, on my contact page, YouTube channel, or Twitter account. Thanks and have a great day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Bri-Toon said:

I did go through a Linux phase a few years ago for a change, but I was never able to figure out how to set it up. It's not like Windows or Mac in which you can buy a new computer with the operating system already installed.

 

That's what I found. I got there eventually but it is absolutely useless for professionals. They can't afford to waste that much time just on an OS and anyway, a lot of them aren't necessarily that technical. Many still don't even understand DPI !!!

 

For a professional, it is much more cost effective to buy something that you plug in and use, with back-up and training. Fiddling around with Linux would be a financial disaster.

 

It's also about training and backup. Where do you go to learn Linux (even if you should have to) and which version of Linux? And where do you go when you get the equivalent of a blue screen ?

 

As I said, Linux is basically a toy for geeks. 


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't judge since I don't know enough about Linux for myself, but I want to agree. For any product at all, there needs to be a business side for customer assistance (contact info, staff, support, etc). From what I gather, it seems more like a collaboration of programmers. In a way, it can be a good thing with the dozens of freeware, but I wouldn't consider that for professional use. I used to research alternatives to Photoshop, Illustrator, Microsoft Office, and there were a lot of results to Linux software. I tried them out, but to me, it just doesn't seem like Linux knows how to stay in competition. Don't get me wrong, they do have very good products, like Krita (probably the best free painting program), but I wouldn't consider them for commercial use. I think part of the reason is maybe a lot of people use programs for other purposes - similar to how people draw in Photoshop when it was actually designed for photo editing.


The website is still a work in progress. The "Comics" and "Shop" sections are not yet ready. Feel free to connect with me and let me know what you like or what can be improved. You can contact me here, on my contact page, YouTube channel, or Twitter account. Thanks and have a great day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a graphics designer but if this product released for Linux i would buy it.

There are 10 types of people those who understand the insides of a computer and those who simply do not.

I use Linux for development because i find it to be more efficient. Why people do not use Linux ? Probably because it is different to what they have learned on and most computers come installed with a operating system that is either Windows or MAC. Most people who buy these sort of computers are the ones who usually watch movies, use the net and write on word. They probably do not know that there is another alternative to MS office. There are alternatives on all operating systems for most applications but there's usually is a learning curve or a UI that is simply not what they are used to and tend to fall back or refuse to use that.

Will it be wise to make Affinity available to Linux?

Yes and i strongly suggest it and here is why.

Windows might have a lot of users but how many of them use photo editing programs and what about mac. Well most people on mac use adobe products so its hard to convince someone to use something other than that. Most people only know about Photoshop to be the best photo editing program out there and will refuse to use something other. You tell them what is affinity they will say meh i prefer to get ripped off and use something that i know how to use and everyone else uses it. Its like the iphone syndrome. I buy it because its apple and there is no reason to switch from what i have learned. No matter if there is a cheaper alternative that has more features.

You release affinity on Linux fist of all the Linux community will explode that there is a new photo editing software for Linux. It probably will be covered on websites like OMG UBUNTU and every Linux you tuber will cover it. Since it will be an upgrade over gimp and there is nothing that will be able to compete with it on Linux it will be instantly adopted by at least a quarter. That is if it does not crash and doesen't have major issues. It can easily surpass the sales on mac. Most Web developers will for sure want to get there hands on it. And believe me most people that use Linux use it as a developing platform.

But wait that will happen with the equivalent blue screens? Or problems that can occur and people needing help to trouble shoot problems?

Linux does not have blue screens and if you do not mess around as a root user you will hardly experience any blue screen equivalent. But in case that there is a problem a solutions is usually found instantly and is posted on various Linux forums. You google your problem its most likely that it is already solved.

As a marketing standpoint Linux can do more good that harm. If it is handled correctly it can sell on Linux more on day 1 than both mac and windows current sales combined. And in the long run it can encourage more people to adopt it on all platforms. More people talk about a product the better it will do (As long as their experience is positive).

Linux Has Free alternatives. They are hard to learn and its usually programs that are made by a group of people working on it on their spare time. Affinity is far from that.

Please do not quote me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BLACK_IERAX said:

Linux does not have blue screens and if you do not mess around as a root user you will hardly experience any blue screen equivalent. But in case that there is a problem a solutions is usually found instantly and is posted on various Linux forums. You google your problem its most likely that it is already solved.

 

So basically, if your computer doesn't work, use your computer to go online and figure out how to fix it yourself. How does that work ? ;) I would have to buy a second machine, just to keep Linux working. 

 

My ex-wife had a problem with her PC recently, she took it down to her local PC shop and got it back the next day. No effort or technical expertise involved. Mind you, I did have a network card failure on my PC a while back and couldn't connect to the net. I ran Windows troubleshooter and that suggested I download the latest drivers. Thanks Microsoft  >:(

 

Many professional users would expect the supplier to come and fix the computer on site. In fact, that sort of warranty is often bought along with a new machine. Where do you buy that for a Linux machine ? In fact, who do you even buy a Linux PC from ?

 

No infrastructure and no professional back-up is what stops Linux. 99.9% of people want to use a computer, not play with it.

 

P.S. Blue screens are usually hardware issues, what happens with a hardware issue on Linux ?


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

15 minutes ago, toltec said:

 

So basically, if your computer doesn't work, use your computer to go online and figure out how to fix it yourself. How does that work ? ;) I would have to buy a second machine, just to keep Linux working. 

 

My ex-wife had a problem with her PC recently, she took it down to her local PC shop and got it back the next day. No effort or technical expertise involved. Mind you, I did have a network card failure on my PC a while back and couldn't connect to the net. I ran Windows troubleshooter and that suggested I download the latest drivers. Thanks Microsoft  >:(

 

Many professional users would expect the supplier to come and fix the computer on site. In fact, that sort of warranty is often bought along with a new machine. Where do you buy that for a Linux machine ? In fact, who do you even buy a Linux PC from ?

 

No infrastructure and no professional back-up is what stops Linux. 99.9% of people want to use a computer, not play with it.

 

P.S. Blue screens are usually hardware issues, what happens with a hardware issue on Linux ?

Well if any computer does not work due to a hardware failure you will need a technician to fix it as your ex wife did. If you can not access it due to hardware failure you would need to either have spare parts to replace them. Linux is a operating system as is mac os or windows. If you want to troubleshoot it yourself and have the technical experience then yes you will need to have a second machine to have the other running. As for your network card experienced my self a issue that windows updates just made my pc malfunction. On Linux everything was working fine.

Dell has machines that come with Linux Installed out of the box as has the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition . As for the warranty Usually computers that are targeted for business come with a on site repair. It is usually marketed that way and not all computers have that warranty.

Ok the back up part made me laugh. I'm pretty sure you have no idea how Linux works on this point. Not only do you have graphical backups and strong terminal backup solutions that can take a backup from your hard drive bit by bit. You can reinstall the operating system while keeping your home directory intact. Which in other words means even if you screw up badly you can restore the operating system while keeping your files intact.

Hardware issues are dealt with the same way as every other computer out there. Blue screens usually are a sign that your ram in failing and Linux gives you the option to run memtest upon boot in the grub menu. But in windows Viruses or "malfunctioning" software can also cause BSOD.

P.S. Please respect my initial statement on not quoting me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, BLACK_IERAX said:

Ok the back up part made me laugh. I'm pretty sure you have no idea how Linux works on this point. Not only do you have graphical backups and strong terminal backup solutions that can take a backup from your hard drive bit by bit. You can reinstall the operating system while keeping your home directory intact. Which in other words means even if you screw up badly you can restore the operating system while keeping your files intact.

 

I meant back-up by professional companies. Like computer sales shops or repair shops, warranty suppliers or software companies. Even training.

 

Not backing-up, as in hard drives.

 

P.S. My ex had a software issue. Something to do with Windows 10.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BLACK_IERAX said:

As a marketing standpoint Linux can do more good that harm. If it is handled correctly it can sell on Linux more on day 1 than both mac and windows current sales combined.

Just curious, but how large do you think is the combined Mac & Windows Affinity user base, & how did you determine that? :S

2 hours ago, BLACK_IERAX said:

Please do not quote me.

That isn't how these forums work. If you are going to post anything, others have every right to quote it in a reply if they want. If you don't want to be quoted then don't post anything, particularly anything based on dubious & potentially offensive assumptions about people you know little or nothing about.


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.6.9.81 & Affinity Designer 1.6..2.24 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, R C-R said:

Just curious, but how large do you think is the combined Mac & Windows Affinity user base, & how did you determine that? :S

Well according to the forum there are a total of

64,247
Total Members

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, BLACK_IERAX said:

Well according to the forum there are a total of

64,247
Total Members

 

So what percentage of worldwide, multi-language Affinity software users joined the English language forum ?

 

Did you join the Chinese language Affinity forum ?


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Affinity products for Linux

It depends on what exactly linux you are asking about. There is bunch of them. All of them are different and have a lot problems with stability. Developers still can't defeat tearing on most distros while scrolling pages in browser or moving windows on screen. I was told on ubuntu forum that i shouldn't use my current NVIDIA card as to it "has problems" with linux. Really? System that supposedly should run on almost any hardware and to be lightweight now happens to be unsupported by casual graphic card. I tried linux and i failed spending too much time setting something up after update. Do not recommend linux anybody. People evaluate product by it's quality and flawless work. There is no quality and especially flawless work. Why Serif Team should even consider developing really expensive code for people who haven't paid for any bite of code on their computer but now for some reason have to pay for this software. No, it is not profitable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same problem with NVIDIA cards. I was setting up a Linux machine for someone and had to try 4 Linux versions before I got one to work.

 

Took me a day and a half.

 

Not exactly an uncommon card.


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×