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Thanks Callum, I appreciate the link, but i was wondering whether it could be made a quicker way by using the grid system on AD and then manipulating afterwards. You can do this on PS, id love to see it on AD!!

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Not so quick, maybe 45 min, but doable.

 

NeonTrough.thumb.jpg.7835eefdc1dcb28a1d1cfed698691151.jpg


iMac 27" Retina, c. 2015: OS X 10.11.5: 3.3 GHz I c-5: 32 Gb,  AMD Radeon R9 M290 2048 Mb

iPad 12.9" Retina, iOS 10, 512 Gb, Apple pencil

Huion WH1409 tablet

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Thanks Gdenby and Callum, Looks like there is currently no way to quickly make this happen. But you have given me inspiration so I thank you for that. I love that 80s style!

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What is quickly?..... or easy ;)? Did the below in about 5 minutes. But it certainly ain't no vector distort...

 

1) Draw rectangle

2) Power duplicate it down in size

3) Add a centered star with 0 inner radius (double star works too). The only tricky thing here is that in order for the star lines to line up with the corners (I think) it has to be rotated 90º.  (star proportions should match the rectangle)

Throw the star into a copy of the biggest rectangle to clip it.

4) "Mask" out the center with another simple rectangle.... or add a couple points and mask out whatever section/piece you want (pictured).

Or clip it with the inverse.

 

Still somewhat editable.... i.e. the star is still editable as a star.

 

599470c26d3f8_ScreenShot2017-08-16at12_12_19PM.png.690d181cd42a17b06056bdc18673e10b.png

 

 

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Note, the image directorfilms posted is not proper perspective. Looks like what a Quantel Paintbox might have made using just straight line tools. The horizontal lines don't seem to get closer together approaching the horizon.

 

My 1st problem was that I'd mostly forgotten the rules for drawing perspective that I'd learned when I was 16. After thrashing around for awhile, I decided to fake it. Made a right leaning trapezoid that seemed close to desirable. Set the rotation/scaling center at the vertical-horizontal lower corner. Power duplicated vertically. Then manually scaled the copies to reduce in both axes to make a receding series. kinda PITA. Grouped, copied, pasted, moved to the side, and then sheered. Again, again again. Grouped, flipped, moved to mirror position. Did a rotate and scale to make the side walls.

 

Then realized that the manual sizing was not quite accurate, and a combine boolean didn't work well. So I had to open up all nearly 700 trapezoids to apply the colored, blurred style, instead of the B&W lines I had. Note to self, add the style and fx to the beginning element.

 

Made some back ground shapes for color fills and gradients.

 

Still trying to find a tute that shows the easy-peesy perspective  grid method I learned w. just a pencil and ruler.


iMac 27" Retina, c. 2015: OS X 10.11.5: 3.3 GHz I c-5: 32 Gb,  AMD Radeon R9 M290 2048 Mb

iPad 12.9" Retina, iOS 10, 512 Gb, Apple pencil

Huion WH1409 tablet

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4 hours ago, JimmyJack said:

What is quickly?..... or easy ;)? Did the below in about 5 minutes. But it certainly ain't no vector distort...

 

1) Draw rectangle

2) Power duplicate it down in size

3 Add a centered star with 0 inner radius (double star works too). The only tricky thing here is that in order for the star lines to line up with the corners (I think) it has to be rotated 90º.  (star proportions should match the rectangle)

Throw the star into a copy of the biggest rectangle to clip it.

4) "Mask" out the center with another simple rectangle.... or add a couple points and mask out whatever section/piece you want (pictured).

Or clip it with the inverse.

 

Still somewhat editable.... i.e. the star is still editable as a star.

 

599470c26d3f8_ScreenShot2017-08-16at12_12_19PM.png.690d181cd42a17b06056bdc18673e10b.png

 

 

 Thanks for that I totally get you, I followed your steps and it works, but it took a bit of playing around with the amount of points on the double star. fair play It also reminded me of my school years drawing things like that. Hats off!

I'm not sure i'm allowed to include links here, but here is a video of a grid being made in PS, this is the kind of easy and quick way I was referring to 

 

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Yes, but you are using Affinity Designer, a vector illustration program, (like Adobe Illustrator) so why compare that to Adobe Photoshop (a pixel editing program) ?

 

I have Affinity Photo and I can do that sort of thing very quickly and easily, just like Photoshop. For the price of Photoshop you could buy Affinity Designer, Affinity Photo, Affinity Publisher (eventually) and still have a chunk of change.

 

Enough for a weekend away in Southend in a decent hotel, with ice creams :D and a trip down the pier.

 

Note: Timing can be important !

 

pier.jpg


Windows PCs. Photo and Designer, latest non-beta versions.

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Toltec, I am not comparing the programs, I only used PS as an example so that all those using AD could show me how they go about making this grid in their own way, thats why i'm here, to ask questions and learn. I have ceased using PS and Ai, and bought AP and AD when they first came out as I believe this software in amazing (Southend better stock up on ice creams this software is going to be a big hit :D)

 

There is a perspective grid in AP which should do the job for the perspective i'm looking for, then i can simply trace (so to speak) in AD.

 

Thanks for all your help guys

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4 hours ago, gdenby said:

My 1st problem was that I'd mostly forgotten the rules for drawing perspective that I'd learned when I was 16. After thrashing around for awhile, I decided to fake it.

I tried an even 'fakier' fake: I just used the image from the first screenshot as a guide to create the converging verticals. I started with the center vertical, drawn with the Pen Tool set to line mode from the bottom center to well above the image (because I did not know where the vanishing point would be & because I am lazy). I then drew the first vertical to its left, starting at its bottom & dragging it out until it intersected with the first line I drew & had the same angle (by eye) as in the image. I repeated that for the other left side verticals; grouped, duplicated, flipped, & positioned them to create the right side ones.

 

I grouped all my lines & masked the group with a rectangle to hide the above horizon parts. That is as far as I went, but it would have been easy to do the horizontals as Pen Tool lines, using the screenshot as a template. I suppose if I was being picky about it, I could apply a pressure curve to all the verticals to create a vanishing point taper or such.

Before masking, the verticals looked like this:

verts.png.3aa87d0f1232c643524251ca54a09baa.png

Not an exact match to the screenshot, but not too bad, I think.

80's v.p..afdesign


Affinity Photo 1.6.7 & Affinity Designer 1.6.1; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.6.11.85 & Affinity Designer 1.6..4.45 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.1.1

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2 hours ago, R C-R said:

I tried an even 'fakier' fake: I just used the image from the first screenshot as a guide to create the converging verticals.

 Its decent my friend! 

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