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BrianHermelijn

Color Profiles for RedBubble? Or Printing Purposes? Any Insights

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In my previous post I received some help in regards to what settings to use in AD for your color profile, now as I continue to do my Lets Make Shapes project or Spacetronauts I realized that I can't put them on Redbubble or Inprnt because of different colors.

 

 

Which the previous solution was :

 

"The color profile you want to use as the Designer document is setup to use Wide Gamut RGB. If when exporting click on More and change the ICC profile to sRGB this should be closer to what you are wanting, for posting on the Web" - Lee D

 

 

Now what I am wondering is  what color profiles to use in scenario for printing your digital artworks? 

 

Because on Redbubble :

"Our garment printers only print in the CMYK format so we recommend designing in this colour spectrum as it will give you a better idea of how the final product will look. You will still need to convert to sRGB colour profile to get your works looking as glorious as possible on the site."

 

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And seeing all of my designs for AD has been designed in the solution posted above, will I be able to convert them to CMYK without losing much of the color choices? Thanks in advance! 

 

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What file format do they accept? What CMYK profile?

 

You can see, more or less, the effect on your work by adding a soft proof layer and choosing one of the CMYK profiles.


My computer is a nothing-special Toshiba laptop with unremarkable specs running Windows 10 64-bit.

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@MBd

The thing is they mention to upload it as sRGB, and check and see how close to the colors it's in the software, but what I am wondering is how can you get accurate colors in the first place, close to what you had before? And didn't knew about that Soft Proof feature, checking your video about it.

 

@MikeW

They don't mention the color profile, rather they mention to upload it as PNG/JPEG and check to see how close your colors for CMYK is in the software.

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I had no idea of who these people were.

 

The site is next to worthless as regards the technical aspects--I couldn't find a single thing relating to file prep easily.

 

The site seems to use CMYK for the actual printing but sRGB for only the display on the site. So two files are required, one for printing, one for what potential buyers see. And likely the sRGB file has a recommended size else they resample to that size upon upload. Dunno because their web site sucks.

 

Here's the thing. It is impossible to print CMYK without a CMYK profile. And if you want to see your art the closest as possible, you need to find out what CMYK profile they use. In the US, that is US SWOP v.2 for most of the garment printers I have sent art to, but not all of them as some of them for some of their products use a hi-fi color system to print DTG (direct to garment).

 

If I were going to sell through them, I would need to communicate with them. At minimum, I would need to know what file format they prefer for the print process and what CMYK profile to use.

 

But as regards AD, you can add a soft proof layer like I mentioned and pick a CMYK profile. One of the worse-case profiles I can imagine for garment/widget printing (i.e., ink limiting) is the US SWOP profile. 

 

As regards designing, I am cautious about using RGB when designing for print. Even with sRGB, there can be quite a color shift. For vector objects (drawn objects and text) I will use CMYK. In these so-called modern days, and depending upon who is printing the work, I will leave images and effects in RGB and where possible use PDF/X-4 so the RGB images are tagged (not that this works in Serif software). But otherwise, it really depends on the print establishment and one needs to communicate with them as to file format and press profiles.

 

With RGB, it can look all glorious in sRGB, even more vibrant in a wider-gamut RGB. But it is very, very easy to have color outside of what can be printed in a typical CMYK spectrum. So there can be color loss from little to a whole lot. Use a soft proof layer...

 

Here's another thing. With an un-specified CMYK profile, if you choose one and they use a different one, there will be a color shift you will not be aware of until you see a sample. Even with RGB this can happen (which is why a tagged PDF is important).

 

Good luck. Mike


My computer is a nothing-special Toshiba laptop with unremarkable specs running Windows 10 64-bit.

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I'm trying to find out this information too for RedBubble. @BrianHermelijn Did you manage to get the info you needed? Thanks in advance.

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