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Hello!

 

I watched the Affinity-Tutorial "ProPhoto cs sRGB" some days ago and started to try this for my workflows.

 

The first obstacle to overcome was, that on my mac there was no prophoto icc-profile. In this forum i found a post about that, where is was shown, that the ROMM RGB Profile should be the same. This profile is on my mac, so I gave it a try! But one thing about the ROMM-Profile I didn´t understand. In the forum-post was a link to the ICC-website to download the ROMM.icc file. I also downloaded the profile (unless the romm was on my mac) just to compare the one on my mac with the one downloaded from ICC. The one on my mac is dated with 2015 or so and the one freshly downloaded was dated with about 2006!? The settings shown via the color-sync app on my mac are also not the same... so is the ROMM on my mac still the same profile than the one from ICC? And are those really the same like the prophoto??

 

After my try on one of my actual projects - I tryed the same workflows than in the tutorial videos - I got stuck with some troubles...

- converting my sRGB Image to the ROMM was as expected. And in some details the result of my project changes quite positively. I could really see that the bigger gammut gave some adjustment- and filter-layers more room to work.

- then i tryed to export the project - like on the tutorial - via the export dialog as an jpg with an sRGB profile again. But the result was not the same, then. The color shift wasn´t the problem! The sharpness of my foto got lost? What I couldnt understand. Exporting a jpg directly from my original project file (in sRGB, not converted to ROMM) looked much better, sharper, like it should look like! So the jpeg out of the "sRGB-aphinityfile" and the jpg out of the "ROMM-aphinityfile" look enormous different, but not like the nice differences I could watch via the profile-conversion.

 

The third and last issue on that is about the soft proof. Because my actual projects will be printed on fine art paper I use the soft proof from the producer to check the gammut. after the romm-conversion it is much more difficult to get rid of the "black" surfaces the gammut check shows. What is expected, because the romm have a much greater gammut. But maybe you can give me some tipps to handle this better, because even in my sRGB projects it is quite difficult to reach the gammut of the producer (the fine art paper) - can it be, that the gammut of this fine art paper is rather small compared with sRGB (and smaller compared with romm)? I watched the tutorials about soft proofing, but on my projects it seems much harder to reach the soft proofed gammut.

 

Thanks for help! the icc profile for my soft proof is attached, as well as the two romm profiles, the one from my mac and the one from ICC. (Wasn´t allowed to upload the icc files)

 

Thanks!! 

Andreas

 

 

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Hello and welcome,

 

you might want to take a look at these sites which deal in the one or other way with that theme:

Related to the possible different ICC file implementations here, those profiles are available from different sources, sometimes they are already pre bundled inside with some RAW converters (Adobe, Nikon, CaptureOne etc.) or certain image processing apps, or they are available from other internet resources. - Some people also do their own profile implementations here, since the Kodak ProPhoto RGB specification is official available, see as an example ...

So beside the dating there might be also slightly differences in those profiles.


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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Hi Andreassaerdna (do they call you Andrea for short?), interesting comments (although I admit that I do not fully follow all your problems). The one thing that resonates with me is the lack of ProPhoto RGB on my Affinity Photo software when I just recently installed it on my brand new MacBook Pro - but strangely ProPhoto RGB is on my iMac copy of Affinity Photo (possibly found it's way into Affinity Photo via an old copy of Photoshop CS5 that I still have installed on the iMac).

 

Wanting to follow the video tutorial (the same as you did) I could do it but only on the iMac not the MacBook Pro so I asked on the Affinity Photo forums what is going on and was told that the Affinity Photo software comes with a limited range of icc profiles and apparently the ProPhoto RGB icc is not one of them. I suppose this is something that Affinity Photo could include in future but I want to know how I get the ProPhoto RGB icc onto my laptop?

 

I want to know where it is on my iMac so I can copy it across to the laptop and then where it should reside for normal Affinity Photo use. Otherwise, how and where do I download it and where to I place it (which folder) if I can get it elsewhere?

 

As a matter of interest, the tutorial works as explained on the video when done on my iMac.

 

This was the first tutorial I had seen that explained how to use a colour gamut in this way and found it very useful.

 

Regards

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1 hour ago, travel bug said:

...I want to know where it is on my iMac so I can copy it across to the laptop and then where it should reside for normal Affinity Photo use. Otherwise, how and where do I download it and where to I place it (which folder) if I can get it elsewhere?

See:

 


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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38 minutes ago, v_kyr said:

Thank you very much for trying to help me but as you can see from the attached screen shots I have had NO luck finding the ProPhoto RGB ICC profile on my computer. It is used in the Affinity Photo program on my iMac but I don't know where it is? Also the link on 'How to install profiles on your computer - Apple/Mac' didn't help either. I just need to get the ProPhotoRGB (not seen on that link at all) onto my laptop. Thanks though for trying to help. See attached screenshots - they did not match the expected results suggested on the Apple Support page.

Library_and_where_can_I_find_the_ICC_profiles_on_my_computer____colourmanagement_net_and_DxO_OpticsPro_10_—_Desktop_—_030A0303squirrelsharp_jpg.jpg

colourmanagement_net2.jpg

colourmanagement_net3.jpg

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Aha! I think I might have found it but it is called ProPhoto.icm (not .icc) - is this it? If it is, will it work if I copy and paste it into a Affinity Photo folder as an .icm file? Which Affinity Photo folder should I put it into?

 

Thanks everyone for helping.

 

Regards

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Yes .ICM files are used by the Kodak Professional Color System and other color management systems. The "ICM" extension is also often used in Windows, but color matching profiles more commonly use the .ICC extension. Both extensions are recognized by most color matching software.

Usually they should be stored and recognized in a OS system chared and reusable manner, meaning that every software can use them then. According to Apple ...

  • You could also use the Mac OS FindFolder API as an equivalent technique. However, one of the key features of Mac OS X is it is designed to be fully network and multi-user savvy. For this reason, there is no longer just one location where profiles can be stored, but several. There is a special location within the Mac OS X System folder for profiles:

    /System/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/

  • ColorSync profiles are primary stored here:

    /Library/ColorSync/Profiles/

    This is where ColorSync stores the majority of its profiles. This is a read/writable folder.

  • Lastly, users can store their own personal profiles in their home directory:

    ~/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/

However, you might want to look where AP had stored those profiles which are supplied with it's software and place it there. Try to use the Mac Spotlight and Finders search facilities in order to find the place Affinity has placed these.


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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On a Mac those supplied with AD are just inside:

  • "/Applications/Affinity Designer.app/Contents/Resources/*.icc"
$ cd "/Applications/Affinity Designer.app/Contents/Resources"                                                                                        
$ ls *.icc                                                                                                                                   
AdobeRGB1998.icc                CoatedFOGRA39.icc               JapanColor2001Uncoated.icc      USSheetfedCoated.icc            USWebUncoated.icc                          
AppleRGB.icc                    ColorMatchRGB.icc               JapanColor2002Newspaper.icc     USSheetfedUncoated.icc          UncoatedFOGRA29.icc                        
CoatedFOGRA27.icc               JapanColor2001Coated.icc        JapanWebCoated.icc              USWebCoatedSWOP.icc             WebCoatedFOGRA28.icc

 


☛ Affinity Designer 1.7.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.7.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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Thanks v_kyr, this will help me a lot. You went to a lot of trouble putting all this together for me. It will be great seeing a wider range of options on my laptop. 

 

Have a nice holiday season ahead.

 

Best regards

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@travel bug ProPhoto RGB also goes by the name ROMM RGBOne of the color profiles installed by default on Macs is at path /System/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/ROMM RGB.icc. This profile conforms to the latest (2013) ISO standard. (The link is the same one @v_kyr provided earlier with the "ROMM RGB" name.) 

 

This profile should appear as "ROMM RGB: ISO 22028-2:2013" in the icc profile choices in the Affinity apps. There is no need to install a separate profile with the ProPhoto RGB name -- just use this ROMM one.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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Thanks R C-R appreciate the information. It’s curious that the video tutorial that prompted this discussion only referred to ProPhoto RGB and its not a profile included in Affinity Photo when installed - a little odd and perhaps a note from Affinity Photo could be added as a footnote to the video for us that do not really understand all this jargon to the degree of some others.

 

Appreciate everyone’s help.

 

Regards

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1 hour ago, travel bug said:

It’s curious that the video tutorial that prompted this discussion only referred to ProPhoto RGB and its not a profile included in Affinity Photo when installed ...

If you look closely at the video, ROMM RGB: ISO 22028-2:2013 is listed immediately below ProPhoto RGB when the latter is selected at about the 0:33 mark. I don't know why ProPhoto RGB is there -- as far as I know it is not installed by default with any recent Mac OS version, & since the ROMM one should be installed on all of them, there is no reason for Affinity or anything else to install a ProPhoto RGB one on a Mac.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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