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O. Chevetaigne

Best Practice for Logo Design

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A question for experienced logo designers:

 

When tasked with creating a new logo, how do you deal with the issue of size?

 

For example, the client may want to use the logo on a business card or small thumbnail on a website, but may also want to use it on a large banner.

 

If it is all vector it should be scalable - but at what size do you begin designing originally?

 

Any other tips or methods you've found that would be helpful?

 

Thanks!

 

:)

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I guess you design at the main medium's scale and then adjust for other mediums.

 

For example, if your client is a magazine that's going to have its logo mainly on print, you should design for that at first and adjust for other mediums.

But if you're designing a logo for a company that makes GPS software for cars and that's their main medium (low/med resolution screens) then you design for that and create versions for other mediums (print and devices).

 

In icon design we create different versions for different screen resolutions so in logo design you should too design different versions for different mediums, color availability, and uses.

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A question for experienced logo designers:

 

When tasked with creating a new logo, how do you deal with the issue of size?

 

For example, the client may want to use the logo on a business card or small thumbnail on a website, but may also want to use it on a large banner.

 

If it is all vector it should be scalable - but at what size do you begin designing originally?

 

Any other tips or methods you've found that would be helpful?

 

Thanks!

 

:)

 

I design at whatever size is going to be comfortable. Which in my case I generally design on a default letter-size page. when I feel that I have a usable design, I will enlarge copies to various sizes, make other copies progressively smaller. I review those both on-screen and on printed copies to look for details that stand out too much (i.e., on the enlarged copies) or drop out (on the smaller copies). I then make any necessary revisions so the logo will look balanced at larger/smaller sizes. I also create grayscale versions which can also show up certain anomalies which get corrected.

 

It then goes out to review. Any needed changes are made, out to review again. 

 

I do not generally use bitmap effects on logos and so when I get to the planned usage stage, I create instances of the approved logo in the required formats at the various planned sizes. I then create a style guide document with examples of which version to use for what purposes, the approved color values, the approved font(s), etc.

 

Mike

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I guess you design at the main medium's scale and then adjust for other mediums.

 

To expand a little on this good advice, the level of detail that works on a business card is often much less than a letterhead. The level of detail modern printing will easily achieve for a letterhead is not what is practical with vinyl signs w/o driving the vinyl pickers and placers insane. Etc.

 

So while vector work is usable over a wide range of scales, the images produced may not. 


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