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But I guess they'd need some full proof of that in their case (a generic statement and the best intention is not anything solid), which is really difficult to know beforehand. At least, something, as is such a big risk. Something like that can sink a company.

Well, what better proof of support could there be than a crowdfunding campaign? I don’t see any risk there if they call, say, 500.000£ – if they don’t make it nothing is lost and if they do raise that money nothing is lost either.

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The issue is...time and resources.  The way you are describing it sounds as if it were all about just posting a blog article explaining the possible project asking people to donate. A crowd funding campaign is a constant work of promotion, creation of marketing material, and most of all, showing a proof of concept, so, doing a a very solid part of the project. At least a functional alpha prototype ! Getting 500k without doing that? :o ... I would be amazed... Even more, a quite advanced stage of the project. You need resources and time, employees' hours for making the promotion material, and also for the prototype or project till certain stage, for people to actually care for backing... The company is already crushed with milestones, with a small team, from what I could read in an old post. (and many others, later on)

 

Unless you mean just making a blank, empty campaign, not doing anything else than the initial post/explanation. And get 500k so ? Well nothing is impossible, could happen. Still, I've seen too many campaigns failing even doing the best effort. And BTW, nothing beats working in several ones, as talking is cheap (hey, not meaning it harshly neither directed to you ;) , is a figure of speech. ), but once working for one, you face a lot of issues. The people is also very variable in trends and at the time to give feedback, and this is an added issue, we suffered that...

 

The possibility always exists, of course. 

 

But then... in case it fails....how would that look? Not to you and me, or any other geek user.  But to the mass, the global opinion. You seem to see no risk neither potential loss.. Any failure is dangerous (been at SEO and marketing for a bunch of years)... If the crowdfunding gets nothing near to the 500k, that's bad promo for the whole Affinity (IMO ! )...  Anyway, I am not saying it's 100% impossible.

 

Then there's another bad side, more in the technical side (in case the campaign is successful, or... even quite before). We get to find out the possible issues just casually, thinking randomly, but am sure they know these very well, since quite long. Even if they don't do nothing until funded, just the announcement, you need at least some research, some rough prototype (of an app as complex and deep as AP and AD are! ) to actually know beforehand that the code base "could" be translated to Linux flawlessly. Otherwise, it could be , again, bad promo for Affinity. Google results bad promo of any product is to be avoided by any company...IE : Imagine the case... people donate, and all, and then all the hassle of telling the backers that the project is not doable, once campaign ended successfully, after finally doing a real prototype, as the systems do not translate well in terms of graphic libraries, or that the engine is not very compatible with Linux code. Or there do not exist certain kind of graphic libraries in Linux, or not performing at the level required, or not as complete as in Mac or Win, as simply has not been the need or focus of anyone.  Great selling slogan for the whole A. line. Heck, even more. Not every one can code in every OS. I've worked very long years inside software (be it applications and games, decades) and found out programmers (seen by the graphics guy, externally) tend to be more based on a particular system. Specially at very high end matters. (IE, Windows graphic libraries, people knowing deeply how to handle kernel stuff of a certain OS, etc). maybe that's not a problem for them, at all (I don't know). But what i experienced is they tend to specialize in an area. AND... not easy to find the ones you need, with the specific experience you need, meaning pro veterans in that specific matter.

 

The point also is: if was that easy (the 500k whole thing and  port all to Linux).. Don't you think they would have made so already ? I mean, if it is all advantages... they have been with the affinity line for a while.. Wouldn't have we already see at least an announcement? Not only we haven't, they have said they are not planing even something like that. So, IMO, cut them some slack, maybe they know what they are doing...   :)

 

And I insist am not anti-Linux. Quite the opposite. And if it 'd be as simple as to put a campaign title and wait for the backers to rain, and reach 500k in 28 days, and then, profit for decades of linux versions! hey, then am all for it. I just am not too fond of basing projects in a not 100% realistic base. You can destroy a company or team if you do it wrong...

Even more, is the matter of the user base. They probably can't be sure if numbers like that (2.27 % against a 91.4 % of Windows (even if that data could be very wrong) ) can make it worth a Linux version in the long run. Yep, you manage magically to pull everything and even develop the whole line in Linux. Can you imagine the big issue if then there are note enough sales to maintain that over time, over the years ?  Not only the culture of free of charge is well installed in Linux (a lot of Linux users are ready to pay for good applications, I know... but how's that % ? ) , is the other fact that over  that already complex perspective, there are already great 2D products in Linux, very, very good, I know them well (Krita, Inkscape, MyPaint, Sk1, Scribus, Gimp, etc) . Yet another risk.

 

Indeed...Who knows. Maybe the main reason is not even related to the campaign matter. I worked at a company developing a pair of applications as its main focus (less complex!). And probably the number of seasoned professional dedicated to developing it was close to identical. Support of a different OS takes the focus of a great key developer, (or a team) at least. Being resources medium/small (I suspect mostly small), they probably know it wouldn't be sustainable over the time, being such a time eater, then yep, would be a high risk/error.
 

My very personal 2c... ---> They'd better off first take some solid gained territory to the huge big names dominating by now the field (and in only Mac/Win). Once solidly installed there, Publisher also released, so you get a kind of a pro suite at a very attractive purchasing option, you are established, can after the good success/impact get new ambitions/fronts, like (but not necessarily that) a Linux version... (But Adobe PS or Max, they never did, and man, are they profitable... You need to convince the men and women (investors, marketing experts, etc) handling the numbers...)

 

My very fear is that they'd end up loosing strength and capability to deliver fast (and time is key...) diverting so much the resources....

 

As always, I could be completely wrong in every detail, though.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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- You don't seem to have many of the limitations and controlled experience as you do with Macs.

- I like using the command line for things like web development task running/workflow.

 

mac experience for a creative person is limited? WOW! spotlight, preview, quicklook, and and and

 

all functions you do not find in this way implemented in other OS 

 

 

also I am with Linux since years - it will never be the future - Linux did not make it. period.

 

the future will be mobile OS devices and not Win or Mac OS

 

Both Apple and Win started to streamling their OS which makes it more usable and reliable than Linux for the majority of users.

this is another reason why linux is not the future.

 

in 3d areas (I work in 3D as well)  it is used a lot but not really in graphic design or such - so please !


Claas Kuhnen

 

 

 

 

Faculty Industrial Design  -  Chair Interior Design - Wayne State University

 

 

Owner studioKuhnen - product:interface:design

 

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Well, what better proof of support could there be than a crowdfunding campaign? 

 

I've chipped in to lots of crowd funding initiatives without ever having any intention to actually buy the thing the funding was for - sometimes i just like an idea enough to throw a few quid at it even though I'd never actually use the end product.

 

Point being - crowd funding does not provide a reliable indicator of future demand.


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

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Linux desktop usage is currently growing extremely fast. ( growing info: https://tinyurl.com/jf7kbjs )

Affinity, just make a build for Linux and the Linux market is yours (Adobe is not there)! Let's go!!! Now before it's too late!

 

Even if Linux desktop was growing "extremely fast" (and I don't think your link proves that at all), what proportion of that growth involves photographers? And of that number, how big a subset is actually interested in changing their current solution? And of that subset, how many would actually buy Affinity Photo?

 

I'm not anti-Linux: I've got a couple of ex Windows laptops that I've had Linux on for years, and I dabble regularly: but I'm a photographer first, and an OS fanboy not at all (I also have devices which use Android and Chrome OS, and appreciate them all): but I use what I need to use to achieve what I want to achieve. 

 

And for me, that means Windows when it comes to photography.

 

It strikes me as utter madness that anyone would wear the hair-shirt of OS zealotry to the extent that they would choose to deny themselves the benefits of Photo simply because of their self-inflicted hang-ups about the OS' on which Photo works.

 

What's your priority? An efficient, effective photography workflow which includes Affinity Photo? 

 

Or a masochistic obsession with wilfully denying yourself what you clearly want - which is Photo - simply because you're unwilling to accept the the reality of the situation, and refuse to use an operating system which will give you access to Photo?

 

Here's the thing. The very fact that some of you will not use Photo unless it's on your narrow terms sends a really clear message that you're not really interested in Photo per se, but in winning an argument about operating systems.

 

That screams "no real market", to me...


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

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mac experience for a creative person is limited? 

 

That's clearly not what he said. 

 

It is a fact that Mac OS is a far more locked-down, closed - limited - environment than Linux.

 

No debating that, and it's true of Windows, too.


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

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Wow ! Hello, cekuhnen, didn't know you were here [ Very well known Blender Artists (Elisyun) forums member. I'm there too since 2002 (used Blender since earler, indeed, I'm "Extrudeface" there and at Wings3D forums. ) ]. A pleasure to have you here :)

 

I would agree - I believe I mentioned in a very early post in the thread - that freedom wise, the one allowing more "customization" is Linux, by very far. You can use it and shape it almost infinitely, but requires a real lot of time in your side. (which at least we full time freelancers don't have as I did while worked as an employee... Well, heck, not even then. ).  Windows does allow A LOT of customization and configuring, just is given to the average joe as a compact thing to make the learning curve smooth. Closed source, and way less configurable than Linux, IMO that gets by far compensated with the fact that it has drivers for almost every hardware on earth, and that the biggest number of applications are produced and ported for that system. Surely due to that 91.4% (or whatever the real number is). 

 

I've heard from mac users that they are very well set with graphic design software, not so much with 3D. I would agree that the most options in software alternatives for graphic production is  -globally, when you consider 3D- in Windows. But IMO, even a user can be wrong about his/her fav personal OS. Macs DO have great solutions for 3D. Cinema 4D is requested in so many job offers (architect medium studios, video studios of mid/smal size,  as a production seat for certain other very different types of companies....) . There's Maya, Mudbox, Zbrush (full standard for game and many CGI companies ) , and a lot more (even Autocad).

 

For a graphic person like me, stability and good performance is key in every day work. Macs give you that, I've used them at jobs. And while there are situations where the flexibility in configuring and variety of applications was desirable even -or specially- at many times while being at those companies, those machines are great for graphic work. But IMO, Windows PCs are, too. You are more likely to need to be savy in system issues than with a Mac, just like a lot more in Linux, than in Windows or Macs. I'm here with Keith that it is indeed a big error to prioritize your OS over a practical solution to get your work done. For years I had a multi boot machine (to the point of having  4 OSes in the same machine !) just hoping the level of productivity in Linux would surpass anything else. That did not happen, even while I use Wings3D, Blender (but both installed in my Windows 7....) and Krita for "traditional" painting (works now very stable on Windows, too. It is at a very pro level, now.  ) in professional work. The day Linux becomes an equal choice of practical usage for a pro, I will probably switch to it (only if I am not forced to abandon the specific applications I use every day for my work )

Heck, as a freelancer, I depend exactly on what I work for the plate of food, am even every day trying to find new tricks to improve work-flows, avoid waits, produce more and better, paint faster and more accurately and digging to crazy limits every technology upgrade (Wacom (their new line is the world winner now, imo...), ipad Pro, cheaper alternatives, etc... ) in terms of tablets and drawing devices accuracy... I don't need added factors that would slow me down...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve

 

https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/media/release/20170302-03

"Customers can now build their own workstations using low cost motherboards with 8 PCIe slots, extremely fast processors, massive amounts of RAM and up to 8 GPUs, which is simply not possible on any other operating system"

 

"By bringing DaVinci Resolve and DaVinci Resolve Studio to Linux, customers can now take advantage of the most robust, extensible, and reliable platform available."

 

 

DaVinci Resolve is now available for Linux  :)  :ph34r:

 

cheers


 

 

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It is planned for around 3075, once robots will have fully replaced us.   ;)

 

(sorry, couldn't avoid it....)

 

*......runnnnssss.....*


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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DaVinci Resolve is now available for Linux  :)  :ph34r:

 

Yah but DaVinci Resolve is free.  Where are Linux guys gonna get £49 from, when they can't even afford an operating system.  :)

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hehe, that was a bit evil.

 

A lot of them use Linux as a philosophy (I've done so)... And lately, many are paying quite more than the cost of all the serif products put together in the form of donating to several projects. Also they often purchase documentation, as is one of the most known ways -besides extra services and some other stuff-  to support open source, other than direct donation.

 

They'd pay for it, the few that they are. As the prob is the general stats, 2% or so...And what an investor has to say about it.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Very nice talk about a technical aspect of it -just the less important one, comparing with a lot other matters when porting to another platform, just the installer...-  Where and how does this address the problems that have been continuously reminded in this thread for eons, now? I mean, the problem is not technical, is in the economics of the matter. Where does the fact that one can in theory port to whatever the platform address the problem that consist in this not being enough to support economically the effort, by any means? Specially prolonged in time, which people would expect from them after a first Linux version. The issue of the 2% (and something) in front of the 91% of user base in Windows... How it is addressed by just the installing matter (while even in a technical pov that's not the big issue: Performance, drivers, compatible libraries or graphic stuff, etc, etc, in the main core code is, not the actual packaging system !   :o  )

 

At least, some others have mentioned Kickstarter. And while for a such task and full re-structuring of a whole company demands way more than the eventual help of just a Kickstarter campaign (to the point that suggesting it is kind of a joke), and it is not a safe bet by any means -and with the increased competition these days, and I know what am talking about at KS, even worse as a reason-  , that still was an intent to offer a solution for the problem. No one would offend you - scratches my brain that you fear something like that-  but is a bit of an insult to their intelligence to not expect that the less critical technical aspects would be very well handled by the developers, and that the actual install thing, with the many options for that today, it'd be rarely any of the main huge issues.

And is very epic (some Churchill sentence (or one attributed to him) would have been even better) to suggest them to take the risk.. That has been something always very easy to do....
 

Edit: Sorry, posted while the latest post was being posted by Patrick, I didn't realize...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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What result do you mean? And who are Linux zealots? And it's important for me because it's rather difficult to view through a lot of topics all the time. It's much easier to read the news, blog, click a link and donate some money.

As for me, I use Windows at work and Fedora Linux at home. And I prefer Linux better because of stability and total system controlling. Nowadays there is no professional graphics software in Linux, but thousands of designers all over the world regularly ask developers to release one. Affinity is super fast and powerful software. I will surely buy Linux version when it's done.

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We have little appetite for a Kickstarter at his time.

 

WOW!

How will we know about beginning of campaign?

 

He said “little appetite”, not “a little appetite”, meaning they are 99% not interested in starting a campaign.

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but thousands of designers all over the world regularly ask developers to release one. 

 

And they're the zealots.

 

If image processing, rather than their obsession with their operating system, was really their priority, they'd accept that Windows or Mac will give them immediate access to Affinity Photo, and simply choose and use one - you don't have to have a childish emotional attachment to your operating system in order to appreciate what it can do for you...

 

But no, it has to be on their (arbitrary) choice of OS.

 

So it's clear that winning the OS argument is more important to them than actually getting access to Affinity Photo, which is otherwise available to them right now.

 

Just not on Linux. 

 

Oh - and "thousands of designers"? "Regularly asking"?

 

Proof of these statements might make the case for Linux more convincing...


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

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Nowadays there is no professional graphics software in Linux,

 

 

Have said it before (even in this thread, but people keep asking things already asked in it, a thread that has some kilometers long, by now (due to the fact that the freedom of speech in this forum is the highest I have seen to date in any place)...), but is never a bad thing to remind people, in general, as IMO is a positive reminder, and kind of a personal testimony about the matter. There IS professional graphic software in Linux, already. I wont get tired of mentioning it. Maybe the term "professional" is very arguable and dependent on point of views. If one considers professional, a software that could with very minimal obstacles, integrate in a high end team/company (that even has a set of Photoshop Actions (like macros) on which they depend critically, for example), mainstream production which requires very specific features, that'd leave in bad position the software I am referring to, now, and even in that case, some people loving their Linux-cross platform (I use those apps in my Windows-only, lately) get the -very hard and considerable, trust me, is a fight the resistance to that in companies- hit of having to use workarounds to be on par with other workers using more complete software in Windows/Mac machines, in those companies or areas where they give u freedom (I know as I did so, in both Win and Linux) . These cases, we were and are a minority, so IMO not valid as a general solution. So, in this understanding of the professional term, nope, Linux software is not yet there... Although... In many usages and niches, I'd say Blender has got there, already. In certain number areas, at least, and always that the company or studio (a significant number of video editing small studios counts already with Blender as the only tool for 3D) counts, or can contract, or is ready to get Blender experts. 

 

For me, that is simply a type of professional, not the only one !  I have worked like that in certain  number of companies, using both high end commercial and open source. Right now am a freelancer, independent, and I do professional work (otherwise no one would want my production) . People working so, professional artists, designers, etc, when the commission is not integrated in certain production chains -and even so, if flying solo in your side, you can adapt to that in most cases-  are, indeed, professional workers.  Blender -is doing for me right now, LOL !!-  already allows this, brilliantly, indeed. Ok, is 3D not 2D, but you simply said "graphic software". As matter of fact, I use also professionally Krita ( a pair of very recent commissions, indeed) for all my painting works. Gimp is extremely powerful at this time. Just the UI is certainly not for everyone (I don't have a problem, but that's me) . And in that very case, I would agree, for the printing world there are issues (but krita can handle most of that matter). Affinity Photo is eons above it in terms of CMYK handling, color managing, etc. And this is just because during years, the focus has not been in that area in apps like Gimp and Inkscape (I believe mostly as a natural aversion to propietary stuff, like Pantones, color libraries, etc, or just developers were not too personally related to those production worlds, and care a bit less). Which is in any case their developers call, by the way, not criticizing it in any way! But then, a bunch of professionals wont use it. (web/screen-only people can use it almost like a Photoshop (very different UI, tho) in Linux, so I have a hard time as well not to consider it professional, for certain uses and market niches. And this IS professional. VRAY is not a general package for modeling, is not a do-it-all, but does one thing amazingly: Rendering. So, is used professionally, even dominating the market in a good number of areas, while is a commercial package. The range of the scope does not necessarily imply being more or less professional, not in all cases. ) .

 

Krita is a total dream come true for painting, supports decently PSDs -a native format is a native format, no one but Adobe can support it fully, and they can change  that as they'd wish, reason why I love TIFFs...-  and even support CMYK mode, in screen, able to paint in CMYK, unlike (till the last version I used, have installed a slightly old one) Gimp, where you cannot do that.  Inkscape : I have used it, and still do, professionally. It's tracer is great, as is an integration of Potrace, which is amazing (sth u require rarely, but when u do, works great). It is VERY intuitive, WAY easier to learn than illustrator (but quite less featured, although with some things surprisingly better, but overall, Illustrator keeps being quite more powerful in high end, professional stuff), it has one of the best inking tools and brushes behavior for drawing that I have seen, but does neither handle the CMYK (although there's a start of attention and development put in that) in work mode properly, neither color managing as it should, for print environments, but it looks definitely promising, like all the apps I'm mentioning. 

 

In that matter, the so considered best applications, the top ones, have their issues, too! . And Affinity's, in the typical number of years that a suite takes to consolidate, even with larger resources -so bigger and more powerful that the comparison is even funny- is really really young, it is still polishing the applications, as they got born "yesterday", so to speak.  But I did so with Blender, let it grow and evolve as I kept in contact, learning and integrating it in my workflows progressively, so that at some point be free of larger monopolies in software, or at least in a %. Happily can say that today I don't need Max or Maya, for anything (in my 3D activities, that is. But I'm not a hobbyist). I still use other  helper addons, and that's not wrong, as is usual in any high end work flow tools. But for very specialized areas (sculpting, normal maps. But you can do so already inside Blender, too.)

 

IMO, you have a much better shot at getting some manuals, a lot of patience, and replicate workflows you do with PS or other commercial mainstream package, with these apps. See what you can and cannot do, and research new work flows to compensate the lack of certain features. You would have to, if working at a company, if you were forced to fill a seat with no Maya installed, and needed to supply with a Max what Maya offers in animation, for certain usages (opposite situation can be found, even also in animation...). And I understand the Linux philosophy, and even I like it, as a dream and all, and dreams become reality when you work in them, at least to an extent, I agree. But I'm telling you: Would do no harm to you to have a multi-boot, or, much better, a second machine -this is crazily convenient for a freelancer like me, even if only for rendering while I work!-  with a Windows installed, and so have ALL graphic apps, free or not, available for your graphic work (my wet dream is to have a Mac, Linux and Win machine in my work room again..). If you are serious about doing graphics, that is. I see a bit not the cleverest to restrict your self to the usage of Linux-only for sth as complex as graphic production (competition and the level of things required today by the market and professional world is crazy), just because you feel more at home with another OS.  A PNG, TIFF, OBJ, LWO, Collada, fbx, PDF, even a PSD, can be transferred from a WIn, to a Mac, Linux, iOS, etc, even in any direction. That's what matters.

 

Once you are in your graphical app, there's no substantial difference if the UI looks a bit more like Apple icons, Windows ones, or KDE / Gnome or whatever.  Is more about if you can handle layers, convert to a specific CMYK profile required by the printing company, and do a professional PDF export, etc, etc, etc. You forget the OS, there, if you are doing serious graphic work.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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count me in in the list of people which will for sure buy additional Linux equivalents of the windows versions

which I already bought and use and somewhat started to even like.

Sadly Microsoft has over the years shown the middle finger to its paying customers by shoving Ads into their various OSes.

Areas Where Microsoft (Win7|8.0|8.1|10) has put Ads in;
task bar, start menu, lock screen, in some pre installed Apps like the weather app.
The newest area where Microsoft puts ADs in the OS is inside the File Explorer.

Serif proclaims that the Affinity Product line is geared towards Professionals, right?
If the Affinity Product Line is truly geared towards Professionals, could they please get that Product line on
OSes which are not infested with ADs?

Take your time, look how much ads Microsoft will add during the next 3 years into the current Win10 OS.

The professionals which Serif is targeting as a customer base on Windows Systems have till 2020

when the support for the (currently) AD free OS Window 7 is ending.

 

EDIT; Take your time also for investigating the potential market of a Linux version, re-evaluate it in a couple years.

If Microsoft pursues its current anti customer way, the alternatives will be favourably looked on by more and more people.


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Sadly Microsoft has over the years shown the middle finger to its paying customers by shoving Ads into their various OSes.

Areas Where Microsoft (Win7|8.0|8.1|10) has put Ads in;

task bar, start menu, lock screen, in some pre installed Apps like the weather app.

The newest area where Microsoft puts ADs in the OS is inside the File Explorer.

 

 

Provided you are not getting  trojans, those "ads" (maybe you mean widgets? You get a lot more on your smartphone...) are so easy to remove and never see them again that a little kid could do so. A... professional, way more easily, of course.

 

could they please get that Product line on

OSes which are not infested with ADs?

 

 

Windows 7 here, and installed per request Windows 8.x/10 (and all previous versions of Windows) to a bunch of friends and family members' computers. None of them ended with ads of any kind. A professional must care as well about configuring correctly (Linux requires a lot more effort for that, as a system. Gives more control too, of course.) the machine's OS, plus it can never be a OS preference, a taste, to establish a solid criteria for your graphic software choice. That can never be considered professional. (the only case would be that your current work flow is dependent on an OS, but that can be Linux, Windows, Mac OS...)

You might be getting confused with the privacy options. Once minimally configured (disabling Cortana, etc, etc, there are many guides on inet), all what it does is a bit of anonymous telemetry which does not affect you or your work at all. You are loosing a lot more privacy in your phone, Google, Gmail, or even in your bank, and people protesting so much about Win 10, don't even start to realize this...

 

The support for Win 7 ends, but like always, it does not mean it stops working. You will be able to work in an isolated machine doing your graphic work with Windows 7 and latest version working over it after that time. Not a nonsense. Seen that being done in companies and getting files and info by USB or simple local network. Also done so to family members PCs.

 

 

EDIT; Take your time also for investigating the potential market of a Linux version, re-evaluate it in a couple years.

If Microsoft pursues its current anti customer way, the alternatives will be favourably looked on by more and more people.

 

 

The more and more people for now is barely above a 2% of the installed user base, in comparison, a 91% of Windows machines, and a ~ 7% of Macs ( I got surprised by this very number, but remember how is a customer user base that has no probs in spending money in technology and software, quite more than the other two...) This was said with Win 10 launch and the wave of protests on inet... It never happened, MS has come with quite good results with Windows 10 in every sense, and people have adopted it, just like always, if not even more....  :D   . Windows 10 AND windows 8.1 , I have tested this, make a very significant improvement in hardware performance. I have seen how comparing clean installs, Windows 8.1 and 10 allow OLD machines that were just barely usable to come to a new life of speed.

 

So... By professional experience, I can very firmly state that Windows 8.1 and 10 are in one of the key matters (performance) much better than Windows 7. And to me, an improvement in speed, with milestones flying at speed of light, is gonna be always really welcome.

 

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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As always, its great to read here the opinions of others and what they think is best in their situation.

Hopefully my writing didn´t come up as beeing pissed at Serif, Serif does a good job unlike what Microsoft is in my opinion currently doing.


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What result do you mean? And who are Linux zealots? And it's important for me because it's rather difficult to view through a lot of topics all the time. It's much easier to read the news, blog, click a link and donate some money.

 

As for me, I use Windows at work and Fedora Linux at home. And I prefer Linux better because of stability and total system controlling. Nowadays there is no professional graphics software in Linux, but thousands of designers all over the world regularly ask developers to release one. Affinity is super fast and powerful software. I will surely buy Linux version when it's done.

moonjasper,

 

I can appreciate your and other Linux enthusiasts' enthusiasm but your own quote actually hurts the case for bringing Affinity's products to Linux. "there is no professional graphics software in Linux" begs the question of why doesn't Adobe, quite possibly one of the money-grubbingest companies out there, make their software for Linux? Surely if there is even a small profit to be made, Adobe would do it. Adobe has lots of programmers, lots of extra cash to throw at such a project so why haven't they done it? The answer is, because the return isn't worth the effort or they would have done it by now and sure enough as soon as it is worth it, they will. 

 

"but thousands of designers all over the world regularly ask developers to release one"-if there are only a few thousand designers who would be interested in using Linux, it isn't a big enough of a market to support the cost of porting the software to Linux. Plus if, as you pointed out, there are no professional graphic design programs on Linux, then it is fair to say that there are no professional designers using Linux, to design at least. If I lived in a country with no cats, it wouldn't make much sense to sell cat food there, would it?

 

I hope that Linux continues to mature and evolve but Linux has a long ways to go.

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moonjasper,

 

... the question of why doesn't Adobe, quite possibly one of the money-grubbingest companies out there, make their software for Linux? 

Some of Adobe products run with Wine or Play on Linux. There is Cross Over too. But I could not run Affinity products through them.

 

Plus if, as you pointed out, there are no professional graphic design programs on Linux, then it is fair to say that there are no professional designers using Linux, to design at least.

So why Linux versions are always asked? Linux is free and studios do not need to buy OS licence. I am full-day employee designer. Our studio uses Linux on development workstations. Designers use Windows. But switching to Linux and Affinity will save a lot of money. And this savings should be one the main reasons to switch.

 

2 SrPX

I am UI/UX designer and I need vector software with assets and artboards to create responsive layouts of websites and mobile apps. I cannot find good Linux tool for this. Inkscape... No. Sometimes there are tons of screens (artboards) in my files.

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