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You guys are part of the very frustrating circular problem with Linux software: Companies don't port for Linux because it is a small platform, but it is a small platform because companies don't port for Linux.

Ness, In my opinion Companies don't port to Linux because they software is full of not tested, legacy code,  that is by some miracle don't fall a part by itself. And that kind of code is not near for them to be able to cross-platform it without spending serious money to Rewrite almost all codebase. Look at any new modern cross platform software like for example game engines Unity, Unreal, Godot, this kind of products in point of code standard portability are feature. The cross platform is the only feature in software development right now. Even MS know it, and bought Xamarin and give it free to masses.

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Please at least consider a crowdfunding action for a linux version.

 

 

The problem would persist: Is not just the initial money to have some -not easy to find- ~15 years experienced programmer in very specific matters, and risk with all so tight in schedules that all would work, is also that later on you need to maintain for the new linux branch and develop all features you go adding to the other 2 OSEs, I bet with two that's already too crazy.

 

IMO the actual linux or community has also some guilt. I've used linux at work for 7 years, in a company I started working ten years ago (not there anymore) . And before, was already an average console and x window user. There's have been a huge resistance to focus on professional graphics apps in Linux, while network, administration and programming received lots of attention. But you wont, IMO take over the masses if you don't provide, at top level (not alphas with many bugs) : 1) graphic tools at really pro level, which if you use them, are not in very heavy disadvantage with other pros working with the top dogs in Windows and Mac.We're not a niche anymore, people using Photoshop... heck, those are legions now, the 90% not using professionally, but they totally needed for many different things 2) Despite being already amazing, unless the compatibility with Office is raised to be extremely good even for advanced features, Libre Office would not end up to convince the masses. They wont move from their Office if for some school work, or file exchange with a colleague at the jobs, gives them probs that might be easy to solve for me; for them is The Ultimate Barrier. 3) Lastly, Games. There we have a problem. Not every one is fond of having Steam -I'm definitely not- and let's asume it, games is doing like so many companies' niches out there. Not enough users, not porting to Linux. IMO, here's there's very little to do.

 

IMO, Linux should start using real carrots, I mean, tasty ones, really useful ones. There's always people very interested in something. make them come for the carrot, because you need numbers. Once you have the numbers, companies, which do this for filling the plate of food, not for evil wishes- will automatically interested to port to Linux.

 

Games, I see it very hard. But in the Office side of things, i see a lot of possibilities, and sth doable. (focus on Libre Office being seamless to  integrate with the MS Office dominated land. ) 

 

Is not like there are not companies strong enough to go, by their own funds and resources, go adding "carrots". If people is ok with Wndows , despite your opinion about it (and trust me, is more than just legions and hordes), they have no motive -other than intelectual- to move to an OS they are not used to, and that is not what mostly find in their jobs, friends' houses, etc. You need to give them a very powerful reason to migrate.

 

For making a better Photoshop, a better Max, etc, you really need a huge inversion, large fund.  Open source can be extremely useful, but onlya few seem to be able to more or less catch up in the sense of doing very well what many indies (even  pro) need. But at the same level of that mountain of features, when the top dogs have armies of developers, is really hard.

 

So, i don't know. Maybe Ubuntu, and othr huge Linux related companies, for their own good, should be pushing for improve drastically in every sense (learning curve AND real capabilities, as is what real pros will mostly care about.)

 

If there are no carrots or special advantages, people wont move. Linux is VERY familiar to  me, and still, haven't got it installed anymore. Does not offer what Windows gives me in terms of amount, complexity and level of the applications I can use with Windows. Let alone how a lot of hardware vendors do pay zero attention to Linux. And if one NEEDS, no matter what, to use a hardware calibrator of certain brand, or a whatever, well, then you might find your self with a great Affinity Linux version, but in an OS where you have to deal with the other stuff. I don't know other pros, but I'm one, and I don't need more issues than my actual freelancing job already brings.

 

That said, I do agree the situation, in apps, OS, drivers, etc, is all improving, very fast.  I'll make the move back when I see an overall improvement enough for fast pro workflows in as many different situations and areas as I see in Windows (heck, Windows for 3D is amazing, for example, in terms of apps variety ). As I would rather prefer a free OS with a more transparent attitude. But not gonna do till I'd be just as fast (again, is not handling knowledge, is not only my long job experience: I've even gone to Linux and UNIX good courses in my  beginnings)

 

Either you would silence those like me who are hoping for a linux version,

 

 

I strongly believe that wouldn't be so much of a factor, lol.... ;)

 

or you would raise enough money to make it happen. Isn't this a win/win for you? 

 

 

The maintenance of the whole branch later on, after a first release, etc, might need a lot more money (and I don't even know if there's any physical possibility of porting the graphic engines to the whatever the linux libraries...) and maybe duplicate the staff...But that's what I suspect, only.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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If anything, bugging them this much might grow a sort of bad feeling against that OS. That's not what you want, probably...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Haha, reading this thread and seeing the amount of newbies chiming in they could very well be sick of us but...

 

Having stumbled across this, I took a keen interest and felt compelled to create an account here to join in the conversation. Who am I, a video professional who has been felt slighted by Windows & Mac operating systems, but still clings to a vestige of a Windows partition soley based for software compatibility with certain creative apps.

 

There is a large degree of circular logic in place in terms of Linux adoption and software compatibility really is the major factor influencing it's adoption. Sure ease of use plays (an increasingly decreasing) role, but compared to an outright hardware monopoly/price gauging, and a virus prone & invasive OS that enjoys imposing updates that could seriously disrupt your workflow it might not be as big of a risk as you imagine. Alternatives for image manipulation and some bought video effects/transitions are really the only things holding me back on to Windows. if someone solves the fills the image manipulation software void with something that could efficiently do the job on Linux, and I will happily buy/learn your software.

 

$500k. Really if you think of it, that's only 10,000 people buying at the $50 price. For something that potentially disruptive, if you crowdfund, they will come ;)

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" virus prone & invasive OS that enjoys imposing updates that could seriously disrupt your workflow "  ---> that's indeed a nooby use of Windows, as all that can be configured and avoided without issues (unless one is an average user, but then, a professional for making good use of the apps, can't be average either in Linux. Or specially can't be in Linux (will get issues sooner or later, that often surpass the average Joe "stamina").) . (I know this pretty well... ) .People keep thinking that only Linux can be used in an advanced way (and really know little about systems, in general)... I've used both in depth...  IMO, advantages and cons do compensate quite among the two OSes. But, yeah, there's that one thing.... is not about circular logic, is facts... Video / film might be different, but the other (quite more) massive markets... lol... I can tell you that among graphic artists for games, graphic designers for print, Illustrators (those which I've known and worked with) , regular office people, and 3D people... Along ten companies, and  working as a freelancer with clients -who also use these apps- the portion of Linux users, or even just people open to even try it, is ridiculously small. Heck, of all that people I might be the most positive guy about the matter (as I worked with it for many years)... Now, you could tell me all the video and film people is about Linux (which imo, is not, depends on sectors, studios...). I won't argue to that, as is not one of my fields. But hey, even the game market alone is way bigger than all that together...  Look at OSes % at browser stats sites...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Linux + Affinity = Dream  :rolleyes:  :wub:

Really, really need 


Linux + Windows | i7 | 12Gb | Nvidia 760+780 | SSD 500Gb | Toshiba 1Gb | Full Zalman | Dell 27" | Wacom | Blender | Adobe | Affinity

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A number of users work with Photoline in WINE for their work on a daily basis

 

And nothing about that arrangement will make for a better or more efficient user experience than would be provided by using the software on its native platform(s) - so what's the point except tedious OS zealotry?

 

Please help me ditch Microsoft.

 

Not Affinity's job.

 

if someone solves the fills the image manipulation software void with something that could efficiently do the job on Linux, and I will happily buy/learn your software.

 

You haven't provided a single good reason for Affinity to do this - your personal dislike of certain operating systems isn't a reason.


Keith Reeder

 

(I don't need bird photography lessons - OK..?)

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I am a professional software engineer working for a small aerospace company. I use Linux both at work and at home. I am also an amateur photographer (here is a small selection of my photos: https://500px.com/michaelthaler).I use Lightroom and Photoshop on a Windows VM under Linux. I would be very interested in Affinity Photo for Linux.

 

There is definitely a market for creativity software under Linux. Krita (https://krita.org) is used by artists. For example, Pepper & Carrot (https://www.peppercarrot.com/) is done using Krita & Blender. Krita runs a kickstarter every year to finance new features (Krita is not a photo editing application, but a painting application).

 

Linux is obviously a very small market compared to Windows. But on the other hand, Linux might not be a very small market compared to Windows when taking into account that most Windows users that are interested in photo editing software are already using Adobe products. On Linux the competition at the moment is Gimp and maybe some of the more advanced RAW converters which I think also offer support for layers.

 

Maybe it would be a good idea to start a Kickstarter campaign to see if there is enough interest in Affinity Photo for Linux?

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if someone solves the fills the image manipulation software void with something that could efficiently do the job on Linux, and I will happily buy/learn your software.

You haven't provided a single good reason for Affinity to do this - your personal dislike of certain operating systems isn't a reason.

 

 

He has given a single good reason... he has said he will buy it! That is the only reason we wrote the Mac and Windows versions...


Patrick Connor
Serif (Europe) Ltd.

Latest releases on each platform 

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Thought I'd chime in here.

I'm a Front-End developer student and started teaching myself GIMP as a way to adjunct my studies.

About six months ago I found myself having a drink without a professional Front-End developer and I asked him if these sorts of programs come in handy.  What he told me was this-

 

- Almost all the front-end developers at his workplace have some experience with image editing.  For a few employees, they work more on the raster editing side then the coding side.

- The majority of Front-End developers use OSX with Linux a close second.

- The OS X users were slowly moving away from Adobe because of the cloud license

- Some OS X users were using GIMP.  Most were using "this new program, Affinity Photo."  This, I should mention, is how I heard about Affinity, and now I am a paying customer

- The Linux developers were all using GIMP

- Almost no one uses Windows

 

I think a point worth mentioning is Linux is a mostly untapped market.  The biggest competitor, Adobe, is a non-player.

The current market share for Linux OS is estimated to be about 2.5%.  That's not huge, but worth considering is that's 2.5% of a market with no commercial competition.  I other words, Linux users- as opposed to OSX and Windows users- will more naturally gravitate towards Affinity.  Affinity users, in turn, will also be more willing to consider Linux. 

 

EDIT: Also, it's worth considering the value of word of mouth.  For example the developer I spoke to used OS X.  I don't and I never will.  I personally find it cumbersome and use a dual boot Linux/Win environment.  If a piece of software is OS X only that means I don't use that software.  When Affinity came to Windows, that didn't matter.  He recommended it, I trusted his opinion, and gave it a shot.  And PAID for it.

In other words, those Linux users will be another avenue to promote your product, and potentially increase sales in not just Linux, but also OSX and Windows.

I love the idea of a kickstarter.

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A kickstarter of 500k is not an easy thing to achieve. I have been able to be in a team which got success by getting 100k (about 60k more than the goal) but we needed two rounds, and it really was a lot of effort, very uncertain during 3 years, with very strong and constant time consuming promotion, plus the amazing ton of work that it is.

 

Ok, about word of mouth. I *am* a front end developer. I have worked doing exactly that during many years (started when there was no CSS, to give you an idea) . Just late 3 years  I have switched to work only as a freelance illustrator (and I was using by then Bootstrap and all that came with it). I've worked a lot of front end developers like me, in the way.  IMO, what he told you was his sensation, or the people he knew. IMO is funny, as the mac people I've known, did liked quite less getting into that specific profile, and more into the high res, graphic design for print world, corporate image, etc. In my experience :

 

 - " The majority of Front-End developers use OSX with Linux a close second. "  --> Absolutely not ! I mean, IMO, there are different real life profiles in that whole huge bag. I have known people getting a lot into the coding part of it, and they were mostly all about Linux (didn't find anyone in mac, but could be just coincidence) ,  or people like me, being full experts in the graphic side, but also able to mount complex portals by using pure XHTML, complex CSS sheets, jQueries, working under ROR, with git and stuff, etc.  I have used all that using only Windows! (including sending stuff by SSH and git.) Like me, a big lot of others. In my experience, the more "graphical" ones, like me, specially in small companies where the webmaster, front end developer, and graphic designer for  print (brochures, brand, video promos, newsletter editing, infinite etc)  is concentrated in the same and single only person. We tended to prefer Windows, as Adobe PS was a neck saver in every freaking situation. Also because a lot of us, actually came from Windows world.  I'm a graphical guy but I've been doing sites and stuff since 1998. I worked then with entire departments, almost all using windows. yep, all back end people were in Linux. (yet to work side by side with someone in a mac in all my web developing experience ! I guess it depends a lot in the area/region and type of company you land at. )

 

So, this statement :  "- Almost no one uses Windows"  Is not true, either. Probably is very accurate for back end programmer and sys admin people. For front end, depends on the person, background, personal preference, and a lot of things. 

 

Consider that when some companies are looking for a super ambitious profile, - and they do in small (but stable and well paying) companies -  they don't care about stories, they want the same guy doing that taking care also of managing all the logo stuff, go to the local print and be able to represent color with total accuracy, in a cmyk printed file, etc. That was,traditionally *very* limited in Linux.

 

What indeed surprises me more is if web oriented people would be pushing here so hard for Affinity in Linux. I mean, I DO handle Gimp and it is *very* powerful. The main thing why I'm here and don't stick with my loved Krita (well, mostly as krita is not a general editor, but a painter, but has enough features for editing, just not as complete as AP, and krita handles CMYK quite well (again, and this is key, AP is specially complete in the print matters)... ) and Gimp (and a bunch other free ones, like the vector based Inkscape) is due to the sad fact that they don't support well stuff for print. CMYK, color profiles, PDF/X good export and a collection of similar matters.  But for web?? I mean, Gimp would provide you anything. So, I'm afraid a lot of people doing only web graphics, looking for Affinity while they have Gimp, simply can't deal with Gimp's quite special UI (like traditionally happens in Blender, too, and is also an error, as Blender is as well extremely good and professional ) Which is contradictory, as Linux users -having been one-  are used to overcome difficulties more than any other OS user.  Even more, hardcore Linux users do deal well with print, by doing a clever use of Little CMS, Scribus, in combination with Gimp and Inkscape. Is a complex workflow but many Linux lovers go that path, and produce very professional output. I pretend always to shorten my workflows, as a freelancer, is my main focus, for survival reasons.  Doing operations In more time what I can do faster (because not all features are implemented for a pro workflow, so one uses workarounds, slower ), otherwise I'd do it in Linux, as I know indeed most of those workflows. But time is money.

 

The part of them with which I'd agree more is those noticing that even being very experienced in Linux, know that they can be faster or  more versatile with PS or AP.  In my case, I simply use the faster and more flexible tool in my hands. Windows allows me working with zero issues (as i know deeply the OS) , so I use it. For modeling, i could model in Zbrush, Max, Modo, Cinema or the whatever commercial choice (I'm expert with Max, worked with it at companies) . Still, I have tested and checked in stressed work environments that i am personally faster in organic modeling with the cross platform Wings 3D, and that in the part as a freelancer where I need a general 3D package, Blender serves me extremely well for my rendering and animation needs. if weren't the case I'd totally purhcase sth instead. Am not a software or OS zealot. But a pragmatic guy. So, the reasoning of it all being "more convenient" under Linux, with the software for graphics that is there for Linux, now, very, very arguable... As also is saying that there are no front end developers in Windows.... :o  I was amazed to read that which your friend told you... No disrespect, tho, to you or your friend... but can't agree in any way, almost.

 

I'm not against seeing a Linux version. I'd welcome it. As what i like of it all (open source) is the generous aspect, specially as allows people with no money and in countries were there's almost not even an easy chance to have even a computer, let alone expensive software!  (even them can put together 50$, somehow) And I have personal friends in some of those countries... But if it is going to damage/slow down the actual core apps development (50$ is already a "socially sensitive price" to allow a lot of people access to professional graphic software)... that'd be a pity...PS and AI competition is already very hard by itself, without "extra help"...
 

Anyway, is a company's decision. They'd do it if numbers and estimations of benefit work well for them. You keep speaking of what "could be" , but in business, risk is a very important factor. They have ensured total success in Windows and Mac platforms. In Linux... Not so sure, to say the least...But who knows. Well, they know.

 


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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No disrespect, tho, to you or your friend... but can't agree in any way, almost.

No disrespect taken.  Like I said I'm a student, haven't stepped foot in a professional environment and likely won't for- at the very least- another six months.

 

Until that happens I've worked my whole life in mental health and have no dang clue what standard practices are in a corporate environment.  I found that information incredibly valuable and thank you for it.

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- Some OS X users were using GIMP.  Most were using "this new program, Affinity Photo."

 

 

What indeed surprises me more is if web oriented people would be pushing here so hard for Affinity in Linux. […] But for web?? I mean, Gimp would provide you anything. […]

 

The part of them with which I'd agree more is those noticing that even being very experienced in Linux, know that they can be faster or  more versatile with PS or AP.

 

In my controversial opinion, a real professional front-end developer/web designer wouldn’t use a photo editor (PS/AP/GIMP) in the first place to work on web graphics, but rather a vector graphics program such as Fireworks, Illustrator, Inkscape, or Affinity Designer for that matter. People that use Photoshop or similar applications to create website designs are abusing a tool that’s not made for the job and make their lives harder than they need to be.

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Lol ! The old Fireworks thing....I've used it deeply while at certain job, long ago.  Hmm, sorry, I can't agree.Besides one can fake vectors' look in many ways in a tool like photoshop, there are many visual styles...I was once doing huge sections of a portal which aesthetics where all based in minimalist pixel art. That's rather be done in a raster tool. Or when you are doing another where you need to be constantly doing photo editing the images you include. And the the guides and sectors in PS combined with good CSS knowledge is all you need. Easy as cake. Indeed, in the end got used to not even needing to use that. Been doing that for years, at light of speed with raster tools, been told to be the "culprit" of traffic increase to company sites in a 30% to 35% for good design, and helped in conversions a similar percentage. You can do it with absolutely any graphic tool, raster or vector of your preference. If you are getting the results your company needs, even faster  than it needs and at top quality, then "you are doing it right", with whatever the tool you are using, raster, vector, and whatever the brand.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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Yeah, you might get quick with a tool if you’re proficient with it. But how much quicker and better could you be if you used the right tool, the one that is made for the job? I remember faintly how complicated it was to create rounded corners on a rectangle in PS – let alone scale or modify the shape without distorting the rounded corners.

 

And if you were designing websites ten years ago it might not have been a big deal but nowadays with SVG support in browsers and mobile devices (and high density pixel displays in general) designing with raster graphics just doesn’t cut it anymore.

And I’m still getting PSD files from so called “web designers” that I have to convert to a working template, and I’m constantly frustrated at the poor implementation and the lack of possibility to make minor adjustments to some graphics for better quality output. Raster graphics tools are just not the right tools for web design.

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Yeah, you might get quick with a tool if you’re proficient with it. But how much quicker and better could you be if you used the right tool,

Sorry, this is mostly an opinion... There are tons of tools out there. (not only PS and Fireworks, indeed) . Is your favorite one, I get it, but not necessarily the best.

 

the one that is made for the job? I remember faintly how complicated it was to create rounded corners on a rectangle in PS

Pretty easy, but yep, faster in Fireworks. On the other hand, doing a pixel art (I mean, a minimalist style, not really game pixel art, tho I''ve very recently done those, too) based, where pixel by pixel, stuff counts, is rather easier and faster in PS or other raster tools.

Besides, maybe you were luckier than me, but in decades, and now, I am requested to do not just front end work and web design, but also design for print (logotypes, needed CMYK mode, color profiles, etc), editing video frames, game UI work, 3D texturing... An all round work horse as versatile and capable as PS (hence my interest in AP) is in the end of the day is way more versatile than Fireworks could ever be. For example, non usable for professional design for printing. But the list is very long.

 

– let alone scale or modify the shape without distorting the rounded corners.

 

Yeah, there are tricks for that, too. Faster in Fireworks , that specific matter, yep. But not all websites require 2.0 rounded corner buttons these days, and am quite ready to use easy tricks to overcome that and not loose the overall power a package like PS has.

 

And if you were designing websites ten years ago it might not have been a big deal but nowadays with SVG support in browsers and mobile devices (and high density pixel displays in general)

nah, I started in 98, but worked very intensely all those years till final quarter of 2013, that's not ten years ago, but 3, besides, as a freelance, have kept doing web projects.

Again, there are many ways to achieve stuff, as to say you can do it only with vectors, lol...

 

designing with raster graphics just doesn’t cut it anymore.

 

Quite an opinion.

 

And I’m still getting PSD files from so called “web designers” that I have to convert to a working template, and I’m constantly frustrated at the poor implementation and the lack of possibility to make minor adjustments to some graphics for better quality output. Raster graphics tools are just not the right tools for web design.

 

We'll have to agree to disagree, here. And a few of them (which are surely web designers, like you, without the sarcasm) are probably great designers, BTW.  

Seems that your work is very specific, am happy for you. But when your boss requests from you a rather wider scope of tasks to be done, and denies to purchase more than one graphic suite, Firewoks does not cut it.  The guys providing you PSDs... PSD is a format that is provided to me by my clients in practically every field, included web design. If your boss, as happened to me so many times while worked in ten companies, would request from you to take a PSD template purchased by someone, for a company that didn't work as smart like us, and I did have actually to adapt a PSD template, in virtually *no time*, or skin a blog to make it look 100% seamless with the PS based website (thanks to good pixel accuracy and good, deep CSS knowledge ), well, PS wins there by KO. And again, the list of cases is infinite...

 

Is this tendency of thinking "my tool is the only valid, and every one else should adapt to my workflow" which is an error. I would never have said so about Fireworks, Gimp, Corel, Xara or whatever. Is the designer using it what counts. And to be fair, there's really not many talented out there.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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+1 for Linux port


------
AD 1.7.1, AP 1.7.1;Hhave ADW, Serif PagePlus X8 and X9 on an old PC
iMac Retina 5K, 27 inch, Late 2015, 3.2Ghz i5, 8GB 1867Mhz DDR3, AMD Radeon R9 M380 2GB; 1TB HDD, macOS Mojave 10.14.5

Wacom Intuos 5 Pro (wireless - without lagging).

Visit my site: TechniSmart (when I ever find time to work on it)

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I have using Affinity Photo for windows today and I liked it, I would love to see a linux version please ! I am currently using Ubuntu Linux. I been a Photshop user for 16+ years and would be too happy to dump it (and Windows as well)

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Hello.

I am a front-end developer using Linux because a lot of tools are just more convenient to use this way.
Almost all of my coworkers develop this way too and yes, we buy software. I think there is bigger market for Affinity on Linux than you think.

If you google a bit you can see that a lot of people literally begged Adobe for PS port for Linux and I doubt it would happen. You can be something that we desired for so many years. Nor Photoshop running on wine, nor Gimp just aint gonna cut it. Starting a Kickstarter campaign might be an interesting idea.

 

I hope you could take a minute of your time and answer this post.

Take care

 

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gnx,

 

Welcome to the Serif Affinity forums :)

 

 

Hello.

I am a front-end developer using Linux because a lot of tools are just more convenient to use this way.
Almost all of my coworkers develop this way too and yes, we buy software. I think there is bigger market for Affinity on Linux than you think.

If you google a bit you can see that a lot of people literally begged Adobe for PS port for Linux and I doubt it would happen. You can be something that we desired for so many years. Nor Photoshop running on wine, nor Gimp just aint gonna cut it. Starting a Kickstarter campaign might be an interesting idea.

 

I hope you could take a minute of your time and answer this post.

Take care

 

Thanks for your input. Not sure there is an "answer", particularly as i'm not sure you asked a question. We have little appetite for a Kickstarter at his time.


Patrick Connor
Serif (Europe) Ltd.

Latest releases on each platform 

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To add my voice, please, please, pleeeeeaaase consider a Linux version or a Kickstarter to fund the development of one.

I have already purchased Affinity Designer (and Photo) for Mac, Affinity Designer for Windows, and I would buy it again for Linux in a heartbeat having made the OS switch.

 

I came to this thread via trying to troubleshoot an error while attempting to install Designer via Wine.

 

Affinity is literally the only software keeping me attached to Win/Mac in any way at this point and I'm confident there are many others like me.

As others mentioned, there are things like http://snapcraft.io/and http://appimage.org/ to make life easier.

Linux might be a smaller share than Mac/Windows, but you'd also completely dominate the space.

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Linux might be a smaller share than Mac/Windows, but you'd also completely dominate the space.

 

 

Really?   :o  With Gimp and Krita around? I know those deeply, and frankly, my suspect is a lot of the users wishing so hard an AP Linux version (maybe with AD is a bit different, but you can do a wild lot with Inkscape + Scribus, of which I have also made heavy usage while at companies) have not used professionally -which you can- Gimp and Krita. I have. My position in the whole thread remains the same: In a perfect world I'd love to see too a Linux version, of course, I'm pro linux, in a conceptual way, for a long time sympathy and as I handle the system very fluidly. In my work as a freelancer, and even for any other personal usage, while having no issue with any of the 3 systems, the practical POV is won by KO by Windows. In reality, that's an extreme business risk you are asking for here, kickstarter or not, a crowd funding project requires your entire dedication till limits backers don't really are much aware of.... I know as I have worked in several ones (always only as an artist!, never a project owner, but have seen what it really requires from an individual or company), and one of 'em very successful.. It might seem as a lot of people posting here in favor of a Linux version, (Linux people tend to be very passionate ;), lol, if all the windows and mac users made a post to say, hey I'm a whatever OS user, there could be an slashdot effect here... ) but big numbers are other thing, the ones investors actually count on and consider... And if there's funding in the middle , in whatever form, only numbers count... Plus, imo the biggest issue is that they clearly don't have extra time and resources to kill or to risk. Not only seems -externally!- that the two apps are a ton of work for their resources -but surely under control and estimated- , but they already have a previous sort of compromise on making and releasing a third application. Might be perfectly much more thinkable a Linux version AFTER that, rarely before. Or that's what my logic says, having, like the 99% people here, no real clue about it...(which anyway, happens while trying to guess whatever company it is that which you are trying to magically guess their long term plans)

 

Even more. Sth people seem not to be considering and is KEY in the professional and business world. Ok, the funding of that has to be...HUGE. I mean, a lot of money. It also needs to get all that in days. I know, silly projects have gotten crazy sums in days, but a lot of people tend to think that's the norm, like every body buying loto thinks they have a good chance... Statistic does not work like that. Plus, have seen too many well done projects not reaching the goal, heck, I've been in one. So, the point is: IF they don't get the goal, that can be bad publicity, too ! . We live in a global culture where failure is very badly seen. Which is a total stupidity, as failure means you have at least tried !!. Indeed, failure is seen even when it's a valid project just with bad luck at some point, which could be fixed an improved, but internet has developed a kind of fast food consumer with little patience and a very short attention span. Speaking in big numbers, of course. Is the great individuals minority which make a lot of things still cool. But again, those are often not what could sustain a company's expenses...And in IT (including graphic software), for some reason, second places are VERY negatively seen, too often. If some one is gonna say, hey, is not sort of already the case, ie, CC vs Affinity? Nah, I don't think so. CC rarely is gonna have a rival in a 1 vs 1 form, in power, money,  resources, years in the market, and user base established. IMO, like Corel and Xara, Affinity, is the league of the clever alternatives. To me, the best situation is a more dominant of higher quality open source (is in a very solid path to that, already got there in some applications), and mid to low cost high quality applications. Both! Not one instead of the other. Indeed, Open source is going that route, monetizing from services, extra documentation, donation, crowd funding, etc. Money is key. That'd go in the best interest of the users, rather than just monopolies, as has been more of the case in the 90s, and still is, but beginning to be seriously threatened. 

 

All that said, hey, if the Affinity products sees its Linux version in the form of a Kickstarter, and catches me with some bucks to waste, I might even back it, even just for the cause, not having even Linux, nor plan to have it while I make this whole thing for a living... My 3D tools are all now fully multi platform, so it'd be quite cool. Don't see myself moving any time soon, tho.

 

But heck, what a ton of work... there would be the angry Linux users -they now have the too angry users not seeing win/mac version already of the  publisher-  when is released the AP Linux version, but not yet the AD one... there there'd be p$$ed off Linux users when still no time to have got into the publisher Linux version... And that all considering there would have been silenced the rants from the angry win/mac Publisher users (really, I strongly doubt ANYTHING new is gonna be done before that's achieved) wanting the pub thing to be an Indesign killer... heck, what a hard life. I wouldn't want that for myself...


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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https://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=8&qpcustomd=0

 

(According to the same site posted... or we could find a new meaning for "extremely fast" (I've seen that , ehm, fast growth since my first experiences with that OS in early 90s...). Because if 2.27 % is huge ...What adjective could we use for the 91,41 % of Windows ? Edit: A 2 % of a big number IS a big number. My point is that with that proportion, makes a lot of sense that a small company does focus on what have more chances of sells... my 2c. )

 

PD: I never am very sure to trust at all these stats sites... it all depends on how they took their measures and data, that counting on not there being some interests or third party companies gaming the system. Usually mostly depends on the type of users from which they are collecting the data, and how they are doing it.

 

 

That said, sometimes for a particular product a niche can be extremely profitable. But I guess they'd need some full proof of that in their case (a generic statement and the best intention is not anything solid), which is really difficult to know beforehand. At least, something, as is such a big risk. Something like that can sink a company.


Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo licenses, Windows 7, i7  860 (2009) 2.8 GHz,  8 GB RAM, GTX 1050 2 GB, HD 7200 RPM.  Wacom Intuos 4 XL.

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