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Hey Dooblaque, do you mean defringing? Chromatic aberration reduction just shifts the chroma planes back into alignment (in ACR, CA reduction is also just a checkbox). You can use defringing which has options for hue (colour), radius (pixel width), tolerance (amount to remove) and threshold (sensitivity). There's also a complementary hue checkbox for removing complementary fringing.

 

Hope that helps,

James


Affinity Photo Video Tutorials - Affinity Photo for iPad Tutorials

Looking for a manual/documentation? Check affinity.help for online help!

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Thanks for the reply.

 

(in ACR, CA reduction is also just a checkbox).

 

Not talking about ACR.

In PS you can tweak chromatic aberration by color and pixel size.

 

Under "Filter > Lens Correction" when clicked a dropdown opens. Here you click "Custom" and you find three sliders to manipulate chromatic aberration.

 

Fix red/cyan fringe

Fix green/magenta fringe

Fix blue/yellow fringe.

 

The sliders allow for plus and minus values which is, when moving the sliders, reflected in real life thereby facilitating accurate adjustments.

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I see what you mean, having the flexibility to move the different colour planes around seems quite useful. You can do it manually by manipulating specific channels, but that's certainly extra work.

 

Do your images have CA in them that can't be removed by regular means then? (IE using a combination of CA reduction and complementary defringing) - I've used plenty of lenses that exhibit CA, but haven't come across any where it's truly bad. I get fringing issues far more frequently, for which I've found Photo is quite good at tackling. You can apply a live defringe filter non-destructively and mask it; handy if you're using aggressive settings and you have areas of the image that contain colours similar to the target hue, as you can avoid slightly desaturating them.

 

Version 1.5 has also implemented automatic lens based correction, including transverse CA plane-shifting for supported lenses. I haven't tested it thoroughly yet but that should in theory limit the amount of extra work needed to reduce it.

 

Thank you for pointing out the feature and for your reply.

 

All the best,

James


Affinity Photo Video Tutorials - Affinity Photo for iPad Tutorials

Looking for a manual/documentation? Check affinity.help for online help!

@JamesR_Affinity for tutorial sneak peeks and more

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Thanks for the speedy reply.

 

I use a whole raft of different lenses with some of them not that good in avoiding aberration. In my particular case Pentax cameras can be used with legacy glass. Automatic lens based correction is not an option here and I don't think it ever will be even with modern glass. Nothing beats individual tweaking, particularly if it is easy to do. Using masks and any other workarounds is not what advanced software should rely on in 2016 for those basic functions. I don't wish to step back from what I do now with the greatest amount of ease. I am sorry.

 

It is still early days for Affinity Windows though. I am not so much interested in a lot of fancy functions, I would rather work with the "bread and butter" stuff which everyday picture manipulation requires and do this speedily and easily.

 

The degree or severity of  aberration is a matter to be considered in the proposed output choice. In my case I am printing large fine art work and here color fringing is very visible and can be annoying.

 

Thanks again.

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+1

3D artists add chromatic aberration to renders. This the only feature I am really missing in Affinity Photo.

yes this would be cool, in photoshop we using arionfx for color fringe and lens effects bloom and glare

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