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adenas599

Newbie here, I have some questiens!

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Hello,

I've just bought the Affinity Photo for Windows after trying the Public Beta and I absolutely love it! 

I have two small questions.
When I import a picture (1280x720) is it possible to have the default image zoom at 100% all the time? (or just on smaller images then it's my monitor resolution)
Because when I import 1280x720 picture, it's zoomed in about 10-20% more than it should be (110-120% zoom).

And the second question, is it possible to import photo directly by dragging/copying from web browser? I can't do it here in Affinity Photo but in Photoshop it worked.

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Hi adenas599,

Welcome to Affinity Forums :)

1. Currently no, but if you press Ctrl + 1 or double-click the Zoom Tool it will change  the zoom to 100%.

2. This is already possible on the Mac but seems it's not working yet on Windows. If you drag the image first to the desktop it will work. I will log this.

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I also mentioned in a previous post that it's strange that an image would be initially loaded larger than 100% ?

Surely an image should always be displayed no larger than 100% unless specifically told to? Bumping the view size up more than 100% seems totally unnecessary.


High-End Photographic Prints

 

 

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I also mentioned in a previous post that it's strange that an image would be initially loaded larger than 100% ?

Surely an image should always be displayed no larger than 100% unless specifically told to? Bumping the view size up more than 100% seems totally unnecessary.

If you often work with image files that are only a few hundred pixels wide & tall on a large screen display like my 27" iMac, it might not seem so strange.  ;)


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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Just out of curiosity - why would you want a small image blown up to more than 100%, resulting in a pixellated image on screen?

By having it zoomed in, you would not be able to see the results of any effects applied correctly, and would then have to zoom back out again.

 

If you needed to make an exact selection, then I can understand zooming in, but to have it automatically zoom in seems unusual?

Just my opinion though :)


High-End Photographic Prints

 

 

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Just out of curiosity - why would you want a small image blown up to more than 100%, resulting in a pixellated image on screen?

Because I do want to see as clearly as possible the actual pixels the image contains. That is particularly important for doing things like manually applying anti-aliasing with brush tools or deciding which (if any) resampling method will give me reasonably good results if I want to enlarge it.

By having it zoomed in, you would not be able to see the results of any effects applied correctly, and would then have to zoom back out again.

 

On the contrary, for most of the editing I do on small images it is much easier to see the results at high magnifications. When I am concerned about the accuracy of the screen representation I use the keyboard shortcuts to zoom to 200%, 400%, or 800%, depending on how many pixels the image contains & how finely I am editing at the pixel level.

 

When I zoom in, I can see things I would not notice otherwise, like fringing artifacts in compressed JPEG files or 'spill over' when using the inpainting brush at small sizes on small areas of the image.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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I agree that this should be an option / set of options like most image viewers have them.

 

I would prefer to always fit the images into the viewpoint but with a maximum of 100% 

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Because I do want to see as clearly as possible the actual pixels the image contains. That is particularly important for doing things like manually applying anti-aliasing with brush tools or deciding which (if any) resampling method will give me reasonably good results if I want to enlarge it.

On the contrary, for most of the editing I do on small images it is much easier to see the results at high magnifications. When I am concerned about the accuracy of the screen representation I use the keyboard shortcuts to zoom to 200%, 400%, or 800%, depending on how many pixels the image contains & how finely I am editing at the pixel level.

 

When I zoom in, I can see things I would not notice otherwise, like fringing artifacts in compressed JPEG files or 'spill over' when using the inpainting brush at small sizes on small areas of the image.

 

Love to see some of your work.

 

Regards    Sharkey


MacPro (late 2013), 24Gb Ram, D300GPU, Eizo 24",1TB Samsung 850 Archive, 2x2Tb Time Machine,X-t2 plus 50-140mm & 18-55mm. AP, FRV & RawFile Converter (Silkypix).

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Hi Sharkey!

 

I think you would be disappointed with my work. I am just an untalented hobbyist who enjoys playing with images, mostly for my own amusement.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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R C-R, never underestimate your own work.

According to your previous post regarding zooming in to ensure that you can see your images at pixel level - this shows that you have attention to detail, and take pride in your work :)


High-End Photographic Prints

 

 

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