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Onur

[AD] Can we change color mode & resolution of an image inside a document?

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Hi people,

 

I want to know if we can change image color mode and resolution inside the document. Image below could explain better perhaps.

 

I am not talking about while exporting all images will convert in CMYK if documents color mode is CMYK. It's not good to see at export if your image looks different in CMYK than RGB which occurs most of the time.

 

Also wondering if we can change resolution of an image into 300dpi in document again not export? Sometimes we should use 150 dpi photo for example in a design but it will look pixelated on printed sample. And changing dpi makes it slightly blur but not pixelated anymore so it could be more acceptable than pixelated one.

post-32505-0-90948900-1480418689_thumb.png


Win 10 Home - 64 Bit on Asus X55A (original specs except SSD)

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You can change dpi, color format & color profile from the options available in the tabs in the File > Document Setup.

 

Regarding dpi, consider that unless you rescale the document, you are not actually changing the number of pixels in any rasterized (bitmap) content it might contain, & dpi won't make any difference for vectors. Although it is an Affinity Photo video tutorial, Understanding DPI might be worth a look if you have any doubts about this.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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You can also add a soft proof layer and select the correct output ICC profile to see what effect the output intent may have on your RGB colors. You may need to choose Relative Colormetric or one of the other options to obtain a close approximation of the color shift. The soft proof layer does not export or hit the PDF.

 

Try it on a copy of a document. Compare the soft proof layer versus converting the document to the correct CMYK output profile to find which mode (Relative Colormetric, Perceptual, etc.,) will obtain the closest approximation of the color change.

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Thanks for your reply guys, I am kind of confused to be honest.


 

 

You can change dpi, color format & color profile from the options available in the tabs in the File > Document Setup.

 

Regarding dpi, consider that unless you rescale the document, you are not actually changing the number of pixels in any rasterized (bitmap) content it might contain, & dpi won't make any difference for vectors. Although it is an Affinity Photo video tutorial, Understanding DPI might be worth a look if you have any doubts about this.

 

R C-R, think about this scnerio please:

 

I create 300 dpi CMYK A4 sized document at beginning.

 

Then import an RGB image let's say 72dpi in 5cm x 5 cm size.

 

In that case even document is 300 dpi, my image will still proceed as 72dpi and will be printed 72dpi in 300 / 600 dpi CTP  progress.

 

1v5my2Cl.png

 

Image above there are mirror of an 72dpi image (bottom one, the original image) and 300 dpi converted version with anti aliasing checked version on top.

 

If send them in pdf below image will look pixelated on printed media how ever 300 cpi converted one will look smoother like example. So usually i convert each rgb image to CMYK 300dpi and then adjust curve values before create a pre-press file.

 

Did this explain what i meant before?

 

You can also add a soft proof layer and select the correct output ICC profile to see what effect the output intent may have on your RGB colors. You may need to choose Relative Colormetric or one of the other options to obtain a close approximation of the color shift. The soft proof layer does not export or hit the PDF.

 

Try it on a copy of a document. Compare the soft proof layer versus converting the document to the correct CMYK output profile to find which mode (Relative Colormetric, Perceptual, etc.,) will obtain the closest approximation of the color change.

 

MikeW, do you know some video/image explanation about this? I don't think i understand you well.

post-32505-0-33529600-1480440325_thumb.png


Win 10 Home - 64 Bit on Asus X55A (original specs except SSD)

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Onur, I am not sure what you mean in your scenario. If your imported image is 5 cm at 72 dpi, it is about 142 pixels by 142 pixels (5 cm is slightly less than 2 inches, so 2 inches times 72 pixels is very nearly 142 pixels.) If you import it into a 300 dpi document, either it will shrink to about 0.5 inches (12 mm) on a side at 300 dpi or you will have to enlarge it by some method if you want it to remain at 5 cm.

 

The method you use to scale it up will determine how pixelated it looks.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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Thats what i am saying. Instead of shrinking, could i change it's resolution to higher value with slight bluring effect. I can change it's dpi in Corel with anti-aliasing option. That method gives me little blur image without any pixelation.

 

Look at this image:

 

1v5my2Cl.png

 

At bottom, it's original image with it's original (72) dpi. On top of that there is 300dpi anti-aliased version. This is what i am asking.

 

Thanks again.

 

Onur, I am not sure what you mean in your scenario. If your imported image is 5 cm at 72 dpi, it is about 142 pixels by 142 pixels (5 cm is slightly less than 2 inches, so 2 inches times 72 pixels is very nearly 142 pixels.) If you import it into a 300 dpi document, either it will shrink to about 0.5 inches (12 mm) on a side at 300 dpi or you will have to enlarge it by some method if you want it to remain at 5 cm.

 

The method you use to scale it up will determine how pixelated it looks.


Win 10 Home - 64 Bit on Asus X55A (original specs except SSD)

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OK, I see what you mean now. There is no provision in Affinity Designer to do this. What you could do is open the image in a new document window & use the File > Document Setup options to increase its pixel dimensions by the required amount after setting its dpi to 300 & use (for example) the Lanczos rescaling method to smooth it out. Then, as necessary use the Pixel Persona tools to blur, sharpen or whatever parts and/or the Gaussian blur fx for that. Rasterize the results (not opting to preserve the fx if you want), copy that to the clipboard & paste it into your 300 dpi document.

 

It is obviously a lot more work but it does give you a lot of control over blurring/softening.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

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