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I wrote this on twitter and was recommended to do it here, so let's have fun.

 

I wonder if it would be possible to have a Curve editor for the saturation as in Davinci Resolve. It's very powerful and easy to use and could speed things up to control saturation by their luminance level without going to masks. Of course, their other curves are very useful too without the need to touch sliders or masks but the Luma makes desaturate the shadows and highlights a breeze.

04fig128.jpg

 

Thanks and keep up the great work you do!

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I wrote this on twitter and was recommended to do it here, so let's have fun.

 

I wonder if it would be possible to have a Curve editor for the saturation as in Davinci Resolve. It's very powerful and easy to use and could speed things up to control saturation by their luminance level without going to masks. Of course, their other curves are very useful too without the need to touch sliders or masks but the Luma makes desaturate the shadows and highlights a breeze.

 

04fig128.jpg

 

Thanks and keep up the great work you do!

This would be amazing!

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It's possible with a curve adjustment blended to saturation, to desaturate you move the point on the curve UP if it's in the lower half (darks), DOWN if it's in the higher half (highlights).

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It is already possible

 

Use a HSL or Vibrancy adjustment and adjust it's blend ranges

 

It's possible with a curve adjustment blended to saturation, to desaturate you move the point on the curve UP if it's in the lower half (darks), DOWN if it's in the higher half (highlights).

 

I'm going to test blend ranges ASAP!!! Thanks a lot!

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Well, for most features, there is always a way to achieve the same result. You can't do anything with Levels or Brightness/Contrast that's not already possible with Curves. You can press Cmd+D to deselect, click outside the selection with a Marquee tool, or go to the menu. The question is if a certain feature makes the workflow significantly more efficient.

 

I think that actual DaVinci-style hue curves fulfill that requirement, in fact, much more so than for instance Brightness/Contrast would. The workarounds here require tweaking values in at least two different dialog boxes. Things like Saturation vs. Luminance (e.g. darken all saturated colors) aren't possible with blend ranges, and even simple stuff like brightening the reds does not offer the same level of control with a B&W adjustment layer set to Luminosity blend mode or the current HSL tool since you only have fixed ranges and linear falloff.

 

Even for Hue vs. Hue, the Bézier curves in a software like DaVinci just give you better control and are much, much quicker compared to messing around with a linear HSL keyer like the one in Photoshop's Hue/Saturation feature – I'd say maybe 4 seconds versus about 30. Not to mention that all these adjustments get really complicated once you want to make corrections to more than one color (say, adjust your reds and yellows) and you have to click back and forth between lots of different dialog boxes and popups, especially if you want to tweak all of them afterwards to get your edits to balance out. Affinity's Blend Curves are amazing and I use them a lot, but it's going to take me ten times as long to figure out what's going on when I open a document with five different HSL adjustment layers which each have Blend Curves applied versus looking at one single simple, straightforward HSL curve instead.

 

For simple use cases like desaturating shadows, no doubt, Blend Curves work perfectly fine for that. But for more complex adjustments in a professional environment where speed matters, I think that real DaVince-style Hue Curves would provide a significant amount of workflow improvement.

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if you use curves set to saturation you actually only need to tweak one curve

 

RGB Curves in Saturation blend mode are definitely an interesting and underused tool. However, they are fairly difficult to use with precision, compared to HSL curves. Also, HSL curves in professional film and video color grading software are usually horizontal Bézier splines with handles and not Catmull Rom splines like in Photoshop-style Curves, so the falloff of the correction can be controlled very precisely and you're not wrestling a curve that tends to just explode when you try to add lots of local changes. Both of course have advantages and disadvantages, though.

 

use the color filter as a direct live mask

 

Exactly, I've actually posted this feature request some time ago of how I'd envision that to work. I also think that the current Blend Curves feature could be made a bit more intuitive and easy to control by adding a preview function so you can actually tell what you are affecting without going back and forth between really extreme color correction settings and the values you actually want all the time.

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Yes, I think that looking at DaVinci's masking and keying, or at incredible tools like 3D LUT Creator really shows how much Adobe has been fast asleep on their laurels with their still photography software in the last few years.

 

It's surprising how much of Affinity Photo has been primarily inspired by Photoshop and its sometimes cumbersome workflows. There is a whole other world out there if you look at Flame/Smoke, Resolve, Scratch, Nuke, and even After Effects, not just with respect to masking, keying and color correction. I'd love to see the folks at Serif look beyond Photoshop more and really redefine what a modern raster image processor can be, even if it comes at the cost of increasing the learning curve for switchers a bit.

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