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drippy cat

Affintiy Photo: Raw Image Development - a new course at udemy.com

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Hi all,

 

I've just released the next course for Affinity Photo. This one is all about using the Develop Persona to develop Raw files. You can view the course here - https://www.udemy.com/affinity-photo-raw-image-development/or you can watch a video about the course here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8vqOTtmo11g .

 

The course is over 3 & a half hours and is focused on the Develop Persona and Raw files. I created it with the course 'Affinity Photo: Solid Foundations' (also at udemy.com) in mind so that the two of the act together. I explain what a Raw file is, the advantages (and disadvantages) of Raw files over jpegs, and I go through the tabs and tools to give a thorough grounding in Raw file enhancement. As well as the theory and tool demonstrations I also take 10 Raw files and develop them so you can see the development process repeatedly. You get the same 10 Raw files as downloads to experiment with.

 

Hope it proves useful to someone,

Drippy Cat

 

Hang on! - go here - https://www.udemy.com/affinity-photo-raw-image-development/?couponCode=AffinityRawPromoor enter ' AffinityRawPromo' (no quotes) to get a discount off the regular price until the end of May 2016!

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Hi Drippy Cat,

 

I've taken your solid foundations course (which is excellent by the way) and i was thinking of doing the RAW course as well. It seems techniques i have learned on the foundations course are repeated in the RAW course? Plus the files i was editing for the foundations course were RAW. What extra would i get from the RAW course?

 

cheers

 

Boybrown

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Hi Boybrown; nice to talk to you again. Thanks for the nice things about the Solid Foundations course. The RAW course is like the SF course; one for newcomers to RAW editing. I explain what a RAW file is & how it's different to other files (the whole higher bit depth thing) & go through all the panels & explain what the sliders do. I also develop 10 RAW files (supplied with the course in case anyone doesn't have their own to experiment with) & develop them in different ways.

 

Honestly? If you are already comfortable with developing RAW files, & it sounds like you are, I'm not sure I'd recommend the course. I don't give any radical new ways of developing stuff. I sat down & thought about how bewildered I was when I first started developing RAW files & what they were supposed to be & why you could do this & why you couldn't do that etc. The course is like Solid Foundations but for RAW files. So again, if you are beyond the need for solid foundations I won't try & grab your money. Instead I'll shamelessly plug the series I'm working on at the moment which is designed to build on top of the SF course by having a whole bunch of tutorials which cover many modern techniques & design practices I've accrued over the years. That might be right up your alley...

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Simon - I have taken both your courses and as a newbie to editing, love them. Tutorials for beginners are so limited out there in the cyber world so I am glad you took the time to make these and look forward to your next one.

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Hi PhotoNewbie & thanks for the kind words! I must admit I'm enjoying the series I'm working on now quite a bit. It goes beyond the basics and really gives a taste of what you can do with a modern & capable image editor. I hope you get a lot out of it & I'll make an announcement here when it's ready or I do a preview video on youtube.

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Hi Boybrown; nice to talk to you again. Thanks for the nice things about the Solid Foundations course. The RAW course is like the SF course; one for newcomers to RAW editing. I explain what a RAW file is & how it's different to other files (the whole higher bit depth thing) & go through all the panels & explain what the sliders do. I also develop 10 RAW files (supplied with the course in case anyone doesn't have their own to experiment with) & develop them in different ways.

 

Honestly? If you are already comfortable with developing RAW files, & it sounds like you are, I'm not sure I'd recommend the course. I don't give any radical new ways of developing stuff. I sat down & thought about how bewildered I was when I first started developing RAW files & what they were supposed to be & why you could do this & why you couldn't do that etc. The course is like Solid Foundations but for RAW files. So again, if you are beyond the need for solid foundations I won't try & grab your money. Instead I'll shamelessly plug the series I'm working on at the moment which is designed to build on top of the SF course by having a whole bunch of tutorials which cover many modern techniques & design practices I've accrued over the years. That might be right up your alley...

Hi Drippy Cat,

 

Thanks for your honest answer to my query. 

 

I haven’t completed the SF course yet. The only reason i’m comfortable editing RAW files is because thats the only format i shoot in lol. I’ve only just got into photography and was told to shoot RAW. The thing that is swaying me to get the course is the 10 practical examples. And as the course is currently discounted my school boy maths tells me it works out at £1 for each practical example explanation which (to me) is a bargain. So i’m gonna go for it.

 

One final query, as i’m a total newbie, is there a section (or can you recommend a tutorial) on getting our newly pristine edited photos ready to print? I know you’ve covered it slightly (i think) in the cropping part of SF course but i have no clue as to what ppi/dpi, file size and format of file to export and send off for printing. 

 

I look forward to the beyond SF course.

 

cheers

 

 

Boybrown

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Hi Boybrown,

 

In that case I hope the course gives you something you can use. As for exporting it's pretty straightforward but I'll go into a bit of detail in case any other soul happens across this post and needs to know more than you might.

 

Common wisdom says that you need 300 dpi/ppi (dots per inch/points per inch) to make it so that you can't see the individual pixels on print. So say you'd want a 5 by 7 print. That works out at 5 x 300 = 1500 pixels by 7 x 300 = 2100 pixels. Conversely if you know you have (eg) a file that's 4000 pixels by 3000 pixels the maximum size you could expect to print it would be 13.33 inches by 10 inches.

 

But.

 

That's common wisdom. Those magazines you look at by some major publishing houses? They print at the lower rez of 250 dpi & no one seems to complain. The fact of the matter is that you can get away with a bit less - depending on the circumstances - because people tend not to squint up close at photos especially if they are larger. There is also software around which attempts to enlarge photos and intelligently resample them to get rid of the jaggies. You can get some great result with them. I use Perfect Resize by on1.

 

As for file format clients used to insist on .tif files but these days a jpeg with quality to maximum should serve you just fine if you are sending it off for a straight development onto print. That's what I do because it's the one format you can guarantee every developing machine that's operated by a 9 year old at your local chemist will recognise.

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Hi Drippy Cat, 

 

Thanks for the information. I just want to be clear (i'm a bit thick you see) would the process be something like this?

 

1. Edit file and if cropping keep original ratio

2. when exporting do you change the pixels if they work out more than the mentioned dpi ratio?. e.g. if i wanted a 6x4" print and the pixels are say 2200 x 1920 on the file would i modify it to 1800 x 1200?

 

thank you 

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If your target print size is 6" × 4", then your original 2200px × 1920px image is the wrong aspect ratio, so you need to crop it (e.g. to 2190px × 1460px) to correct that. As Simon says, the DPI value (300 or 250, or whatever) dictates the maximum printed size for acceptable quality, but for my example you wouldn't resize the cropped version down to 1800 × 1200 for a 6" × 4" print: you would simply print it at 365 dpi.


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