Jump to content
David4

To embed a colour profile on file export:

Recommended Posts

James is talking about the Soft Proof Adjustment layer, David …  :)

 

If you leave this layer checked and flatten your image, the information contributed by the adjustment layer will be merged with the image information (or the information contributed by all other relevant layers). Let me just quote Kirk from the other thread:

 

The critical thing to realize here is that if you flatten your layer stack with the Soft Proof adjustment layer enabled you are burning that soft proof change INTO THE RGB values of your document!  It now becomes a permanent change.  THIS IS NOT GOOD!  Soft Proofing should be a simulation of the output device, not a permanent edit to your RGB data.  Soft proofing with an adjustment layer should be done with the understanding that the soft proofing adjustment simulates the output device so that you can add, say, a curves adjustment to compensate for a slight loss of contrast due to the printer.  So, you add the soft proof layer to simulate the output for your printer-paper combination, then you tweak the image to compensate for the output device.  Then you DISABLE the soft proof layer and save your adjusted file for output to the specific device you simulated with the soft proof.

 

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/18821-i-am-soooo-frustrated-with-this-soft-proofing-and-no-one-helping-sure-i-have-used-soft-proofing/?p=87793

 

Does that make sense?  :)

post-1198-0-53407100-1462303346_thumb.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

James, why don´t you just use the printers profile as your working profile?

Isn´t using a different working profile than the printers profile a sort of double conversion?

I mean - if i want to output something to different destinations (web, print) I would use a wide gamut profile.

 

But if David would use his custom printer icc instead of ProPhoto he would not need any SoftProofing and would not have to do any conversion on his way to the printer?


 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

James, why don´t you just use the printers profile as your working profile?

Isn´t using a different working profile than the printers profile a sort of double conversion?

I mean - if i want to output something to different destinations (web, print) I would use a wide gamut profile.

 

But if David would use his custom printer icc instead of ProPhoto he would not need any SoftProofing and would not have to do any conversion on his way to the printer?

MBd, 

 

You may find this Cambridge in Colour three part tutorial about color management informative. In particular, note that a wide gamut profile applied to an output device (like a printer) with a much narrower gamut would produce very poor results.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think his custom profile is a wide gamut profile at all.

Hopefully it is matched as closely as possible to the gamut of the printer/paper he is printing to, but the point is using a printer profile as a working one on a wide gamut device like a computer display would defeat the purpose of the conversion process that makes the color management process useful.


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.3.155 & Affinity Designer 1.7.3.1 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iPadOS 13.1.2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

James, what do you do differently when you output a file instead of printing directly?

What´s the difference:

- if I just select another color profile during export > empedd color profile

- if I choose convert ICC Profile

- if I choose assign ICC Profile https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLlr7wpAZKs#t=18m30s

 

huge confusion here ...

my main question is which commands are destructive, as I see it now, convert is destructive whereas assign is not, could someone confirm this?

 

converting into the same color space twice obviously also makes a difference as one can see when using a soft proof adjustment twice VS once (makes sense that it behaves like that though)

 

If I take a RAW with sRGB settings in Camera and then assign AdobeRGB later, would it be the same as if I´d have chosen AdobeRGB in Camera?

 

I mean how RAW is the RAW really  :blink:  :rolleyes:

 

I mean let´s really get this straight please.

 

 

EDIT

 

GOT IT https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/33820-color-profiles-management-eg-srgb-adobergb/?p=165094

Edited by MBd

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alex,  I did not know not to.  Now I understand.  Thanks ! ! !   I now unclick soft proof adjustment before flattening.

 

Could you elaborate on why you flatten your image with the soft proof adjustment applied?   :)

Cheers, Alex

 

 

 

RCR:   But if David would use his custom printer icc instead of ProPhoto he would not need any SoftProofing and would not have to do any conversion on his way to the printer?     

 

Good question RCR... ProPhoto RGB is an editing space, and working space. Originally created by Eastman Kodak.   It's a wide gamut editing/working space that not all devices can deal with.  Consider looking into Chromix web site.   They may have visual presentations of various color editing/working spaces.   I use their ColorThink 2.3.1 regularly to compare my profiles to each other.

 

Consider downloading it.  I think it's a valuable tool for digital imaging.

 

Melissa RGB color working space is similar.   It's the native color working space in Adobe Lightroom.  Melissa RGB is a Gamma 2.2 variant of linear ProPhoto RGB.

 

I would suggest I, and others use ProPhoto RGB  for future applications and future hardware that will need this larger editing space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RCR:  Watch,the video  

.

 

This video starts at part II.  I would have you consider watching the entire video from beginning.   

 

On another subject, RAW is unadulterated digital information from the camera sensor.    There is not yet any color editing space.

 

If one lets the camera send out a jpg, it is not RAW.  And it is in whatever color working space the camera manufacturer decides.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so happy that you were able to finally solve this issue, David … must have given you a lot of headaches and frustration …  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

These are the Terms of Use you will be asked to agree to if you join the forum. | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.