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David4

To embed a colour profile on file export:

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Hello Affinity family.   This is from the help menu.

 

"By default, exported files are unprofiled, i.e. a colour profile is not embedded within them."   Does this mean when I export an image file from AP,  the .icc profile is not included?    Help says this file is not included for use in WEB.   I don't export to web.  I export for further imaging corrections, and finally to print.

 

What are the steps to do what the below sentence requests?   Possibly, this is the reason I see inaccurate image presentations when viewing the same image file in AP and PS CS5.

 

 

  1. With Export Persona active, choose your Preset in the Export Options panel.
  2. (Optional) Select a different ICC profile from the pop-up menu. Otherwise, the document's colour profile will be embedded.   3.  Check Embed ICC profile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To embed a colour profile on file export:

  1. With Export Persona active, choose your Preset in the Export Options panel.
  2. (Optional) Select a different ICC profile from the pop-up menu. Otherwise, the document's colour profile will be embedded.
  3. Check Embed ICC profile.

You can also embed an ICC profile via File>Export (click More> in the dialog).

By default, exported files are unprofiled, i.e. a colour profile is not embedded within them. This maintains a low file size optimized for web use. On opening the file, your working colour profile will be assigned to the file.

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Which export method are you using, the File>Export one or the Export Persona one?

 

Which (if any) Preset are you using?


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Thank you for asking, R C-R.   I go to file >  export >  and the dialogue box comes up.  I use tiff, lanczos 3 non-separable. and finally export button

 

David4

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Naw...that can't be it.   ProPhoto RGB is already chosen.   Maybe I should choose the custom paper profile I have created.?

 

 

Again:   "By default, exported files are unprofiled, i.e. a colour profile is not embedded within them."   Does this mean when I export an image file from AP,  the .icc profile is not included? 

 

 

Really wished there was a simple answer, like what I know, in PS CS5 and LR 6.5.1.    No goplbley gook, strait and narrow.   Been using those PS since 3, and learned color management from the best.  Lectures with auther of Real World Color Management , Bruce Fraser.

 

And lectures and classes galore.   Not bragging.  Just I have not sat around and done nothing regarding color management.

 

I am not sophisticated in coding, and other stuff.   Nope!   Beyond my abilities.

 

David4 

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Hi David,

 

in order to make sure that the correct .icc profile is embedded in your exported file, click the More … button on the export dialogue, and you will be presented a second dialogue, where you have to tick Embed ICC Profile, if that checkbox isn’t already ticked. From the menu above choose the profile to be embedded, either the document profile or any other one from the list. If you have installed a custom one, you can embed this as well. Then click Close and export.

 

This procedure does not depend on the file format, or to be precise, it pertains to all file formats where .icc information can be embedded in a document of the respective format. In other words, it’s the same if you are exporting to Tiff, Jpeg or PNG, for example.

 

Hope that helps …  :)

Alex

post-1198-0-98440100-1462052231_thumb.png

post-1198-0-93196700-1462052238_thumb.png

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Naw...that can't be it.   ProPhoto RGB is already chosen.   Maybe I should choose the custom paper profile I have created.?

ProPhoto RGB isn't a profile suitable for printing to any paper -- it is a very wide gamut profile, & there is no printer/paper/ink combination that can reproduce a gamut that wide. Like A_B_C (& Affinity help) says, if you are using File > Export, click on the "More" button & select an icc output profile matched to the combination of printer, paper, & ink that will be used to create the print.


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Hi 

A_B_C.    

 

Question

 

Make sure ProPhoto RGB is chosen, or the custom .icc printer/ink/paper profile is chosen?

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Been using it.... and again just now.       Not the solution.     Box has been checked.

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Been using it.... and again just now.       Not the solution.     Box has been checked.

Could you be more clear about what you mean by this? There is more than one step to doing this properly: you must both check the "Embed ICC Profile" box and chose an appropriate output (print) profile for the intended printer/paper/ink combination. (It will not be ProPhoto because as I said before, that profile's gamut is much too wide to be reproduced on printed media.)


Affinity Photo 1.7.3, Affinity Designer 1.7.3, Affinity Publisher 1.7.3; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
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Hi David,

 

would you be so kind and provide the following bits of information:

 

1. Color profile assigned to your document

2. Target format for your export, e.g. .tiff, .jpeg, .png, .psd.

3. Steps you are taking during export.

 

Somewhere there must be something going wrong …  :unsure:

Cheers, Alex

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Okay.  Let's get this straight.   ProPhoto RGB is my color working space.   Repeat.  My color editing space is ProPhoto RGB.  I cannot be any plainer than that.  My color working, color editing space IS ProPhoto RGB.  Not my printer profile.

 

NOT my custom .icc printer/ink/substrate profile ! ! ! ! 

 

Target format is tiff.  tiff!

 

If you folks are not on the same page with me, David4, than there is a huge gap in our thinking, and goals.   

 

So, work with me ! ! !  Please.  

 

Custom .icc printer profile is used for printing to my Epson Pro 9900, 44 inch wide printer.

 

ProPhoto RGB is my editing/working space.

 

Got it?

 

Forget all the stuff about displays and screen capture.  Has nothing to do with fine art printing.   I had been requested to send screen captures for others to compare what I saw on my PS 272 professional display.  And I did.  Then some of you started discussing the display issues.   That had NO baring on looking at differences in screen captures, or what gets printed.

 

Simply put, when I am prepared to send an image file to my Epson Pro 9900, 44 inch wide printer, I have a choice of two methods. One method is to use the print dialogue in Affinity Photo.  I have the option to see a preview before printing.  The preview does not have the appearance of what my finished image file looks like and I expect to print. Period.

 

The other method is to export as a tiff and use this exported image file to print through LSI's Printao 8 software.   And again, what  I see on the display does not match what I have prepared to send to the Epson Pro 9900, 44 inch wide printer.

 

In either situation, the image file needs more adjustments.   THAT SHOULD NOT BE THE CASE ! ! ! ! ! 

 

Kind Regards,

 

David4

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David,

 

It is just about impossible to be on the same page with you if you just keep repeating what you have already written & do not answer the very specific questions asked of you. For example, saying "Custom .icc printer profile is used for printing to my Epson Pro 9900" does not tell us how you are doing that, step by step, in Affinity.

 

Also, it would help to know how the appearance differs, if you are using the small preview in the OS X print dialog for comparison, & anything else that you have not previously explained in detail, preferably step by step, without omitting anything.


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Well, I had shown how they look different with screen captures..   Then other discussions showed up regarding displays, which had no baring on screen capture.  Screen capture simply allowed others to view the differences.

 

Are you asking me how I create my custom .icc profiles for my Epson Pro 9900 44 inch printer?   What the steps are?

 

Are you asking me where and how I use my printer profile in AP?

 

For me, it would be easier to speak with you on the phone.   Let's speak on the phone.   If okay, I will give you my phone number.

 

I am ready now

 

PS:   What I keep repeating is the simple way color management is implemented in PS CS5, and in LR 6.5.1.   No secrets.  No complications.   

 

Should it be I am missing some simple step in implementing color management, a simple phone call can help me.  

 

Answering the below question, I look at the images. full screen on my NEC PA 272 display.   27 inch display.   Not thumbnails.

 

 

Also, it would help to know how the appearance differs, if you are using the small preview in the OS X print dialog for comparison

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Please list, step by step, what you do to embed your custom icc profile in a photo file in AP.

 

Regarding viewing print previews, are you using a soft proof & viewing this in AP or doing something else?


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Hi David,

 

as R C-R and others have said, it would be very helpful, if you were able to detail your workflow in the form of a numbered list from start to finish (without leaving any detail) and if you did so for Photoshop as well. As you can see from earlier threads, many people who are willing to help have a hard time to guess where the point at issue has to be located. Would you be so kind to take the time and write down a protocol in the following way:

 

1. Affinity Photo Colour Management Settings:

 

a. RGB Colour Profile: ___________________

b. CMYK Colour Profile: ____________________

c. LAB Colour Profile: __________________

d. Rendering Intent: __________________

e. Black point compensation: __ ticked __ unticked

f. Convert opened file to working space: __ ticked __ unticked

f.a. And warn: __ ticked __ unticked

g. Warn when assigning working profile to unprofiled files: __ ticked __ unticked

 

2. Develop Steps, for instance:

 

[a. Open RAW etc.]

[b. Adjustments to the RAW file in Develop Persona]

[c. Click Develop]

 

3. Further Adjustments in Photo Persona

 

4. Export Steps, for instance:

 

[a. Choose File > Export …]

[b. Select Tiff]

[c. Click More … button]

[d. Embed profile (which one?), tick respective button]

 

5. Use of External Application for Printing

 

That would be very helpful. Does that make sense?  :)

Cheers, Alex

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Hi David,

 

as R C-R and others have said, it would be very helpful, if you were able to detail your workflow in the form of a numbered list from start to finish (without leaving any detail) and if you did so for Photoshop as well. As you can see from earlier threads, many people who are willing to help have a hard time to guess where the point at issue has to be located. Would you be so kind to take the time and write down a protocol in the following way:

 

1. Affinity Photo Colour Management Settings:

 

a. RGB Colour Profile: ____ProPhoto RGB_______________

b. CMYK Colour Profile: _none___________________

c. LAB Colour Profile: _____none_____________

d. Rendering Intent: _perceptual_________________

e. Black point compensation: __ ticked __x unticked

f. Convert opened file to working space: __x ticked __ unticked

f.a. And warn: _x_ ticked __ unticked

g. Warn when assigning working profile to unprofiled files: __ ticked __ unticked

 

2. Develop Steps, for instance:

 

[a. Open RAW etc.]  white balance, exposure, brightness, black point, be sure I am in ProPhoto RGB for working/editing space profile.

[b. Adjustments to the RAW file in Develop Persona]   exposure, brightness, black point, flatten

[c. Click Develop]   exposure, brightness, black point, soft proof for printer/ink/substrate being used, levels.  crop and size   flatten

 

3. Further Adjustments in Photo Persona   same as above

 

4. Export Steps, for instance:

 

[a. Choose File > Export …  export only if need tiff for printing to LSI's Printao 8

[b. Select Tiff]  yes

[c. Click More … button]   double checked, yes

[d. Embed profile (which one?), tick respective button]   ProPhoto RGB, the color working space.

 

5. Use of External Application for Printing   use AP's print dialogue to send to printer.            Also use LSI's Printao 8.   This requires export as tiff.

 

That would be very helpful. Does that make sense?  :)   More thoughts?   David4

Cheers, Alex

The print, after several hours of curing, is less saturated than on display..   

 

When using PS CS5 or LR 6.5.1.  the print is nearly, almost, the same as what is on the screen.  You see, I make adjustments in either LR or PS, and know those modifications  will print as I see them.

 

I never every tell my clients results will be perfect.....though sometimes, for whatever reason, they are.

 

At this point, AP cannot be used for "professional" printing.

 

If someone IS using AP for professional printing, please inform me how they do it.  

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David,

 

Please do as A_B_C asked & post what you are doing in the way he suggested. Otherwise, we have no way of knowing what you actually are doing & there is no way we can suggest anything that might help.

 

Phrases like "several hours of curing" or "I make adjustments in LR or PS" tell us nothing about that -- it is a lot like saying "I did some stuff & didn't get the results I wanted."


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David,

 

Please do as A_B_C asked & post what you are doing in the way he suggested. Otherwise, we have no way of knowing what you actually are doing & there is no way we can suggest anything that might help.

 

Phrases like "several hours of curing" or "I make adjustments in LR or PS" tell us nothing about that -- it is a lot like saying "I did some stuff & didn't get the results I wanted."

 

RCR I don't see what else David can possibly tell you that will enlighten you to help him with the last response. Looks pretty cut and dry. I can follow all the things he was asked.

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Hi David,

 

it seems the issue lies in the fact, that you render the soft proof adjustment into the image, just as kirkt detailed here:

 

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/18821-i-am-soooo-frustrated-with-this-soft-proofing-and-no-one-helping-sure-i-have-used-soft-proofing/?p=87793

 

Could you elaborate on why you flatten your image with the soft proof adjustment applied?  :)

Cheers, Alex

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At this point, AP cannot be used for "professional" printing.

 

If someone IS using AP for professional printing, please inform me how they do it.  

 

David, I cannot work out why this colour management process has become so complicated; all I can tell you is that I successfully print photography professionally using Photo.

 

My workflow is straightforward:

 

1. Profile monitor using a colourimeter: I use an i1 Display Pro with DisplayCal (Argyll CMS frontend). I profile to D65 sRGB at 80c/d².

 

2. Develop images in Photo with this profiled monitor. I tend to work in LAB or RGB 16-bit.

 

3. When the editing is complete, I will flatten the document or merge visible; this is to ensure that all adjustments/filters are rasterised and will print correctly.

 

4. File - Print, then from the printer dialog, I go to the ColorSync options and choose to manually manage colours; at this point I pick an appropriate .icc profile based on my print media; for example, Canon printer drivers include several profiles for glossy and matte papers.

 

5. Send to print, then compare result with the on-screen version. I have accurate colours and tones.

 

I've printed off a wide array of photographs including difficult material such as low light scenes, and I haven't had an issue printing with colour management this way, the results have always been as expected.

 

If you are using soft proofing, just be aware that if you flatten, print or export your image, it becomes rasterised and affects your final output, so uncheck or delete it beforehand.

 

Hope that helps


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RCR I don't see what else David can possibly tell you that will enlighten you to help him with the last response. Looks pretty cut and dry. I can follow all the things he was asked.

Why, thank you, evtonic3.      People who have NO idea of critical color management and digital capture and digital printing are not helping.     

 

Quoting from RCR:  Phrases like "several hours of curing" or "I make adjustments in LR or PS" tell us nothing about that -- it is a lot like saying "I did some stuff & didn't get the results I wanted."

 

RCR:   Curing:    This is a natural physical phenomena for a Giclee print.  Whether canvas or archival, acid free watercolor paper.  Colors change.  Some areas get lighter, some darker.  Professional printers know not to judge a print immediately after is comes out of the printer.   I usually have a client look at an Artist proof, a day after printed.   

 

When I print the 'target' that will be read for custom .icc profiling of the printer/ink/substrate, I wait three days before reading this target.  

 
Cheers,
 
David4

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RCR I don't see what else David can possibly tell you that will enlighten you to help him with the last response. Looks pretty cut and dry. I can follow all the things he was asked.

Then perhaps you can explain something more enlightening about what specific adjustments he is making in Affinity vs. in Adobe & how they compare, or what exactly he is previewing in each app.


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David, I understand what curing is & why it is important but that has nothing to do with what we have been asking for, which is a detailed, step by step description of your workflow process before you print anything.


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James....  uncheck or delete "it" before hand.   What is "it"?

 

If you are using soft proofing, just be aware that if you flatten, print or export your image, it becomes rasterised and affects your final output, so uncheck or delete it beforehand.

 

Hope that helps

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