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1. Not every photo opportunity occurs when a high performance DLSR that saves & outputs RAW files is available.

 

2. Even high end DSLR's have only so much dynamic range available to capture light levels & particularly at the lowlight end of the range, the useable levels are fewer than one might expect because of sensor noise, the different cutoff points for different colors, non-linear tone response curves, etc. (See for example this discussion of the dynamic range characteristics of the venerable Canon D50.)

 

3. Some metering modes may not give enough weight to everything of interest in the shot, for example clipping (blowing out) highlights in underweighted areas or producing excess noise in some lowlight areas.

 

So basically, whether done automatically or manually, exposure bracketing is a way to get more usable dynamic range to work with than would be possible in a single exposure. Does that make sense?


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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I am not exactly sure what you mean by the "LOG" approach but even if you have only a single image to work with, using a stack of layers may be a preferred approach if (for example) it is desirable to do as much as possible non-destructively or to selectively mask parts of some layers & apply different filters or adjustments selectively to each of those layers.

 

It all depends on what you want the final image(s) to look like. That may not always be to maximize dynamic range or color accuracy. And of course, as I said you may not always have a high dynamic range RAW file to work with.


Affinity Photo 1.7.2, Affinity Designer 1.7.2, Affinity Publisher 1.7.2; macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 iMac (27-inch, Late 2012); 2.9GHz i5 CPU; NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M; 8GB RAM
Affinity Photo 1.7.2.153 & Affinity Designer 1.7.2.6 for iPad; 6th Generation iPad 32 GB; Apple Pencil; iOS 12.3.1

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well, the workflow the tutorial describes is fast, simple and effective, but the resulting image , in my experience, tends to keep a certain grayness, that can be only partially corrected with a hsl adjustment. in order to enhance the resulting image, is often necessary to apply more adjustment accurately masking the areas where they would disrupt the image.

the multi-layer approach works better, ihmo, but -i agree with you- it involves lots of work with masks and adjustments, so maybe in the end it depends on the level of accuracy and the final effect you want or need to achieve for a particular image.

 

EDIT: in addition, i think that we are not discussing about hdr, which invelves some maths in the dynamic range enhancement. the process of stacking multiple layers derived from the same shot should be more appropriately, imho, called dri (dynamic range increase). maybe the workflow of the tutorial is a bit more similar to hdr, in that it aims to get full advantage of the actual dynamic range handled by sensors.


take care,

stefano

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Yeah - I don't get the "multiple copies from a single raw image file" thing either.  The data are all there in the single raw file, the challenge is to learn how to tone map the raw conversion to get the result you want.  Nowadays, many applications promote a "final image" from a simple process, instead of generating a good base image (like a log file) for further work.

 

kirk

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