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tutorialCover-1024x512.jpg

 

Hi!

I want to share this short tutorial which explains the technique I use to get a convincing watercolour effect.

It is very short because the source file is included at the end of the post (about 129MB) so you're free to experiment.

 

Let me know if you have any question about it!

Please forgive my spelling and grammar mistakes...  :P


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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Badass.... great tutorial and working file Paolo! It just feels so great with a tablet, albeit a little slow on my 2011 MBP... however, with a little patience, the results are truly gorgeous! Thanks again!


2017 15" MacBook Pro 14,3 w/ Intel 4 Core i7 @ 2.8 GHz, 16 GB RAM, AMD 455 @ 2 GB, 512 GB SSD, macOS High Sierra

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After playing with it some more, I have to say I prefer the results with the Correction Curve turned off, or much subtler... I find I lose the color too much... but it's a nice control to have to post process I suppose... :) 


2017 15" MacBook Pro 14,3 w/ Intel 4 Core i7 @ 2.8 GHz, 16 GB RAM, AMD 455 @ 2 GB, 512 GB SSD, macOS High Sierra

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Thanks folks!

 

 

About responsiveness, rember that you can always turn off effects.

I own a 2012 MBPR ans 2010 iMac27 both run pretty smooth.

The base file is something like a 26Mpx to demonstrate that resolution/performance is enough for production aims.

Try scaling it a bit.

After playing with it some more, I have to say I prefer the results with the Correction Curve turned off, or much subtler... I find I lose the color too much... but it's a nice control to have to post process I suppose... :)

 

Yep! Painting directly with Curves active is very difficult because some tones disappear.

Sometimes I turn it off too, but it very useful to see a punchy effect in real time.


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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Obviously it works with any brush and depending on tools you can choose the preferred surface.

For GouachesAcrylics and Oils for example I suggest to use a canvas texture (for example) and turn off Smoothing and Grain effects.

 

gouachesOnCanvas.png

 

Result will be crispier as with dense pigments.

If you want to speed it up more, turn Brush Texture off changing the select from Nozzle to None in Brush Edit panel.


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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Hi Daub, I only recently started with digital illustration/painting and I use Clip Studio Paint because I feel it gives me the closest feel to "real" painting. I purchased Affinity Design to see if it will work for me and found this tutorial. I see however that you are using Affinity Photo. Will I be able to use this same technique in Affinity design? And if not, why would Affinity Phot be better for Illustration work rather than AD?

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Hi Chrissie!

Thank you for your question.

 

Well... I think that both are suitable for digital painting and illustration.

If you prefer vector design, AD will fit best your workflow but even if it offers the very same painting engine, in some cases AP gives you some more handy tools.

This particular technique for example depends on Live Displacement and other Live Filters that are AP only.

 

By the way thanks to the shared file format, you can open the AP file (available in my website) in AD and keep the live filters "alive"   :)

So as a starting base you can use this filter within AD non destructively too, even if you can't add further ones (you need AP to do that).

 

I use both Clip Studio Paint and Affinity Photo for digital painting because their engines offer different and clearly peculiar vibes.

In AD tend to keep vector stuff and UI design projects.


The white dog, making tools for artists, illustrators and doodlers

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