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Hey,

I want to create a halftone version of an image. Seems only way to do this is by using Live Halftone filter?

I am no expert, but I think it is safe to say that the halftone filter is not working as expected. Comments on the images themselves as well.

  1. This is a close-up of a detail in the picture, with no pixel view mode selected. Clearly, the white is entirely white - there are no real half toning going on here that is worth conserving in the exported image.
  2. Zooming a bit out, the halftone fill for the white remains the same size as in the first image; now a bit more visible.
  3. Enabling pixel view mode, the white is filled - as if it is gray. This is how the PNG export looks like. Which of course is completely useless. And white is there a completely white halo around the desired halftone pattern?
  4. Again with pixel view mode disabled, the white even is no clearly no longer white - despite the first image showing no such contrast.
  5. Same image with pixel view mode enabled, clearly making the issue even worse.

I have no idea how to work around this, or how to "bake" the halftone at a certain zoom level - if that is possible?

I need to fix this, as what I have tried so far results in rasterised exports (PNG, JPG, etc) that are completely useless to me.

Am I doing this all wrong?

Thanks,
Johan

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"I have no idea how to work around this, or how to "bake" the halftone at a certain zoom level"

The zoom level only affects the appearance on screen, not the actual effect of the filter. Viewing the image at pixel size (Ctrl+9) gives an accurate view of how the image actually looks.

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5 hours ago, PaulEC said:

"I have no idea how to work around this, or how to "bake" the halftone at a certain zoom level"

The zoom level only affects the appearance on screen, not the actual effect of the filter. Viewing the image at pixel size (Ctrl+9) gives an accurate view of how the image actually looks.

Err, maybe I didn't make the problem clear: the export is the issue, not the screen. The screen however, can be used to verify that there is no halftone details in the white areas, yet the export gets a base gray. The seemingly unavoidable problem is that:

  1. The completely white regions of the picture are exported as halftone "gray".
  2. The only white in the exported area is the halo around a halftone area. This is clearly not how halftone should work.
  3. Even the zoom on screen shows that the white turns gray when zooming out. Again, white should stay white in halftone - no matter the zoom level.
  4. A border is added to the image along the outer edge of the exported image.

Any idea how to fix it? To me this looks like a bug in their algorithm, as the filter is really to simple to mess up. But I would LOVE to learn about any available workaround that does not require a manually added mask.

In short: I would like any and all suggestions that will allow me to export halftone versions of photos containing white, where white stays white - without the demonstrated pixel gray.

Thanks again!

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Remember that for live filters it's critical to view them at 100% zoom. If you view them at a lower zoom level you do not see accurate results.

-- Walt

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Affinity Photo 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.4.1048 Beta   / Affinity Designer 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.4.1048 Beta  / Affinity Publisher 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.2.1024 Beta

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Note that Affinity apps cannot produce true monochrome images so the halftone (live) filter only creates an effect that simulates a halftone. But if that is ok then you should be able to avoid these kinds of issues by first seeing that the background does not have semitransparent pixels (e.g. as residues of antialiasing), and then use thresholding to remove any gray tones after the halftone effect has been applied.

Here is an exaggerated scenario on how these kinds of broken halftone effects can happen:

a) Continuous tone image with transparent and semitransparent areas in the background and antialising at "edges":

halfbaked_halftones_01.jpg.e8809624420be8e7fae2f4325f08927a.jpg

b) Halftone effect applied to this:

halfbaked_halftones_02.jpg.c687e5ba72281561eb7fb25d556214a0.jpg

c) Halftone applied when flattened first against white background:

halfbaked_halftones_03.jpg.f42295c19a4603b8760903081f64ca41.jpg

d) Thresholded to remove gray tones:

halfbaked_halftones_04.jpg.c926a04481346284d05f7334b9e8c8fd.jpg

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