Jump to content

How to select all Artistic Text in all pages/spreads in Affinity Publisher?


Recommended Posts

No. At least, not in 1.8, though it's possible 1.9 could add something.

However, depending on why you want to do it there might be alternatives. Are you having a problem that requires having the Artistic text as curves?

-- Walt

Windows 10 Home, version 20H2 (19042.685),
   Desktop: 16GB memory, Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00GHz, GeForce GTX 970
   Laptop (2021-04-06):  32GB memory, Intel Core i7-10750H @ 2.60GHz
, Intel UHD Graphics Comet Lake GT2 and NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Laptop GPU
Affinity Photo 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.4.1048 Beta   / Affinity Designer 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.4.1048 Beta  / Affinity Publisher 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.2.1024 Beta

Link to post
Share on other sites

hi @walt.farrell

 

I'm using Verdana for for a card game I'm designing (as a hobby in my free time). I'm about to go to production.

Verdana license for Windows (from what I understand) allows you to use Verdana for for commercial purposes but before sending it to publisher you have to convert Verdana text to Curves. The publisher will receive the Verdana text as curves and not as fonts, therefore it is according to license.

It's not allowed to send the card Game containing Verdana fonts as normal fonts. You have to convert it to Curves before sending it to a publisher or anyone else for commercial use.

Microsoft already paid (and therefore the customer indirectly) for the license to use Verdana commercially as long as it remains inside your computer. This is my understanding at least and I'm not lawyer so best to consult one before taking my comments as facts :)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the additional information.

What export format will you use? If PDF, then in the More... dialog you can choose to convert all the fonts to curves during the export, leaving them as text in your original file.

image.png.14101027a0c0dc46b69158c1c5dd2c85.png

 

-- Walt

Windows 10 Home, version 20H2 (19042.685),
   Desktop: 16GB memory, Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00GHz, GeForce GTX 970
   Laptop (2021-04-06):  32GB memory, Intel Core i7-10750H @ 2.60GHz
, Intel UHD Graphics Comet Lake GT2 and NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Laptop GPU
Affinity Photo 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.4.1048 Beta   / Affinity Designer 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.4.1048 Beta  / Affinity Publisher 1.9.2.1035 and 1.9.2.1024 Beta

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I wasn't aware of that for pdf. Thanks. :o

1)

So which option do I choose in Embed Fonts, "Text as Curves"?

What does All Fonts option  mean and why is it in Embed Fonts, I'm not sure I understand what either of these mean? I know what the word Embed means but I'm not sure I understand it. Why not just have a check box called "Text as Curves".

 

2)

Also (curious question) if I am exporting to PNG, there is no option for Text to Curves. I assume it sort of does that automatically because it converts it to bitmap?

context: I'm asking because recently I've been sending prototypes to thegamecrafter.com , I'm newbie.

 

3)

Also I noticed with .SVG there is a checkbox called "Export text as curves", just FYI. nice to know. thanks.

 

Okay... I need to sort this out in my brain. Thanks @walt.farrell I was going to do it page by page if not for your advice.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. Yes you want to have text converted to curves here, thus "Text as Curves". - Embed Fonts means that all in the doc used fonts are then embedded inside the PDF, this is handy if other people who are reading a PDF file don't have certain of those fonts installed on their OS (otherwise a PDF reader would use and associate other similar available fonts from an OS here).
  2. Yes, PNG is a bitmap format and thus any text will be there shown inside a PNG file as a bitmap/raster (as pixels) presentation of the initial text.
  3. Yes, for the SVG format, text can also be exported as vector curves instead of using SVG text+font definitions.

☛ Affinity Designer 1.9.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.9.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, aymanzone said:

So which option do I choose in Embed Fonts, "Text as Curves"?

What does All Fonts option  mean and why is it in Embed Fonts, I'm not sure I understand what either of these mean? I know what the word Embed means but I'm not sure I understand it. Why not just have a check box called "Text as Curves".

Actually you don't have to convert text to curves but may use the embed option for PDF export. This is the common use for PDF (initially invented as exchange format). Font foundries who don't want a user to embed their fonts may prevent it in their files, then those would create an error message on export.

Quote

(...) font foundries can forbid font embedding for certain typefaces through their end-user license agreement. In TrueType and OpenType fonts, they can add this restriction in the font data. Applications that properly honor the licensing policy of such a font will not embed it in a PDF. Only a few type foundries actually release fonts with such severe restrictions, but they do exist.

https://www.prepressure.com/pdf/basics/fonts

However, regarding Verdana I suppose this font does exist on every computer (though there maybe various versions around, for instance from a Microsoft app or OS or from a macOS installation).

Converting text to curves in a PDF will increase the PDF file size, depending on the amount of text the resulting size may be disturbing.

macOS 10.14.6, Macbook Pro Retina 15" + Eizo 27" // Affinity preferred in Separated Mode + Merged Windows

Link to post
Share on other sites

ah, So @thomas 

 

According to your quote: 

Quote

Actually you don't have to convert text to curves but may use the embed option for PDF export.

 does that mean I just choose All Fonts?

image.png.4846e6f40373b99772158e61866eeed6.png

 

My publisher asked me to set text to overprint when using Adobe -  "Black text should be pure black (C:0% M:0% Y:0% K:100%) and set to overprint"

So I'm trying to set text to overprint using Affinity Publisher. I'm assuming I need to "convert text to curves". My main objective is to find the overprint option in Affinity Publisher (I hope that makes sense)

Sorry for the string along.

 Thank you

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

K100 black text is overprinted by default in all CMYK PDF export methods in Publisher, but it seems there is a bug which causes overprint setting to be ignored (even if it is directly applied on swatch and not just specified as an export setting) if you embed a profile and use the default "PDF (press ready)" preset, so I'd recommend not using that but e.g. PDF/X-1a:2003. 

EDIT: On a second look, and when rendering the file e.g. in Photoshop, it seems that overprint attribute works ok also in a "PDF (press ready)" export with an embedded profile, it is just that overprinting fails to be shown in the Output Preview of Adobe Acrobat Pro when a color profile is embedded in a file where it is not needed and where a color profile needs to be picked manually to get correct color readings.

overprinting.jpg.a273a5e470844219c5e0504f4f4e9a08.jpg

But if you do want to base your export on "PDF (press ready)", then make sure that you do NOT embed the profile:

donotembedprofile.jpg.c22afd4139a1486218e3ead025b5fc30.jpg

To check overprinting, you'd unfortunately need prepress features like ones in Adobe Acrobat Pro:

verdana_yk100.jpg.cac057ae74e848cdc41762e254b9893b.jpg

Here the mere C plate is previewed and it can be seen that there is no masking (knockout) for black ink (but there is for yellow ink):

verdana_k_overprinted.jpg.f9d295d529984d602f884be5f483efc2.jpg

Verdana has regular embeddding rights in the license so you do not need to convert it to curves but can keep it as a font. Embedding a font is not same as distributing a font, but even that would be permitted use in purpose of getting a job printed.

verdana_legal.jpg.28a6fd7a552a409a237bc6087f00ee9e.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @Lagarto 

1)

Quote

But if you do want to base your export on "PDF (press ready)", then make sure that you do NOT embed the profile

What is the significance of "Embed The Profile" option. Isn't it just a tag with my ICC profile like FOGRA 39 for example?

 

I'm going to ask publisher https://pandagm.com/  if I can use PDF/X-1a:2003 instead of PDF (press ready), that will allow me to Embed the ICC profile (I guess?)

 

2)

I understand "Overprinting black" option, which I assume is equivalent to adobe's "set to overprint" for text. But what is the significance of Embed Fonts ? hmmm, I thought Embed Fonts was equivalent to Overprint in Adobe. I never noticed the "Overprint black" option until you screenshotted it.

 

Thank you.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, aymanzone said:

What is the significance of "Embed The Profile" option. Isn't it just a tag with my ICC profile like FOGRA 39 for example?

It will include the target (CMYK in this case, e.g. Coated Fogra 39) in the exported file. But this is useful only if the document has something to be converted and tagged for conversion. "PDF (for press)" however will convert everything to target CMYK (=DeviceCMYK) so the profile is not needed. It only just causes confusion.

If you instead export using PDF/X-based methods, they use standards where profile handling works as expected, so they will always include the output intent profile and embed source and target profiles as needed. The plain vanilla "PDF (for press)" profile is a mixed bag that may cause automated preflight routines to reject the PDF as invalid format so therefore PDF/X-based routines are a better choice.

40 minutes ago, aymanzone said:

But what is the significance of Embed Fonts ?

It just includes the fonts that you have used in the document in the PDF so that it is not necessary to convert text to curves or deliver fonts with the PDF. The receiver of the file does not need to have the fonts you have used installed on their system as when the job is printed, the fonts embedded in the PDF will be used. This is a regular practice so virtually all font licenses allow this usage.

UPDATE: I checked the Panda .joboptions: it is a pretty standard profile, so just use the default "PDF (for press)" and untick the "Embed ICC profile" option.That will make an export file equivalent to this:

panda_export.jpg.b3ae508e0eee17d057f2faa86e1e5e0c.jpg

 

40 minutes ago, aymanzone said:

"Overprint black" option until you screenshotted it

Yes, that is also a kind of a standard, so e.g. in InDesign by default K100 (object assigned with the default [Black] color swatch) will overprint (but its tints will not, so e.g. 99% black will knock out). Publisher does the same whenever this export option is checked.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please note there is currently a delay in replying to some post. See pinned thread in the Questions forum. These are the Terms of Use you will be asked to agree to if you join the forum. | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.