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Hello,

how would you remove the shadows behind these two persons?

Paste, then color replacement and finally inpaint?

Or only inpaint?

or something else?

thanks in advance 

Michael

IMG_9413.JPG

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What I probably would do is eliminate the background completely by selecting just the two people, inverting the selection, & erasing it.

Then I could either replace the background with something that looked pleasing or try first saving a part of the brick background that was free of shadows as a separate layer & using that to create a uniform background via cloning, inpainting, etc. 


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If you want to remove the shadows, here's one way to do it:

(1) Put a Curves adjustment layer on top of the photo. Click the "Picker" button and then click on the photo inside of the shadow. Drag the Curve upwards. Everything will be way to light.

(2) Invert the Curves layer. Paint with white on the Curves adjustment layer to slowly bring back the adjustment. I used a small brush set at 100% opacity, 1% flow, and about 50% hardness. I also used a Wacom tablet for more control, but this is certainly optional.

(3) Afterward, I put a blank pixel layer on top, sampled the pink color in the brick, and dabbed sparingly to get rid of the border between the original brick and the adjusted area.

Here's what I got (obviously, I only did the man's shadow and left the woman's shadow alone). In order, this is the original picture, the Curves adjustment, the mask on the curves adjustment, and the result.

1076509202_ShadowRemoval.jpg.d58c24399639cfa405e09a5073f0673a.jpg

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Thanks! How do you invert the curves layer? 

And how do i paint it white? 

And how can i do step 3?

The result you have is amazing! 

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1) Invert the Curves layer by choosing "Invert" from the Layers menu, or simply by using Command-I (or Control-I if you're on Windows).

2) Once the Curves layer is inverted, it is completely "black." This means that the built-in mask for the adjustment layer is completely black, so it "conceals" the adjustment. To paint it white, choose the Paint Brush tool, choose White as your color, and choose settings for the brush in the Context Toolbar (as I said, I used 100% opacity and 1% flow so that I could build up the adjustment by painting white little by little). To paint the adjustment back in, make sure that the Curves Adjustment is selected in the Layers panel, and just use the paint brush on the image.

3) Step 3 involves putting a new pixel layer at the top of the Layers stack. To do this, choose "New Layer" from the Layers menu, or click the New Layer icon at the bottom of the Layers panel. This pixel layer will be completely empty. Choose the pink color by using the Color Picker Tool (see below) and clicking on the appropriate color in the photo. I clicked on the light pink between the heads. This will load the paint brush with the pink color. Choose the paint brush with the pink color active, make sure the new Pixel Layer is selected, and dab a little with a soft brush (you can even use the same settings as before, or maybe increase the flow a little bit - 30-50% will work nicely if you're careful).

1702815742_ColorPicker.jpg.5179896e77060196d05598f4d00eeb3f.jpg <--- This is the Color Picker Tool. Don't worry if your Tools look different from mine - I have Customized mine quite a bit.

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I tried it but it didnt work for me. I must have done something wrong. I see what i did wrong. I used step al over the adjusted place instead of around the borders. 

If you increase your flow and your hardness you will get more paint out of your brush?

And less opacity is less coverage? 

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5 minutes ago, Michael I said:

I used step al over the adjusted place instead of around the borders.

I'm not sure what you mean when you say that.

As to the other questions, the reason that I use 100% opacity and 1% flow is that the opacity setting will basically set the maximum opacity attainable (with a single brush stroke, that is) but the flow describes the rate at which the brush color is laid down. So, if I use 1% opacity and 100% flow, I can brush over and over but never get beyond 1% opacity until I lay down a new brush stroke. On the other hand, if I use 100% opacity and 1% flow, I can use a single brush stroke to slowly add color each time the brush flows over an area.

Hardness just describes the edge of the brush - that is, how much of a "feather" is there? Less hardness (a "soft brush") has a feathered edge; more hardness has a better defined edge. The reason I used a "harder" brush is that the border between the area to be adjusted (the shadow) and the surrounding stuff (the man on the left, the un-shadowed wall on the right) had such a well-defined border.

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