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Wosven

Pantone as global colours should keep their name

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Hi,

I noticed a slight modification with the new beta. Earlier, when adding a Pantone as global colour, we had to option to modify the swatch name ("global colour x") and modify the global colour name ("Pantone 123 C").

Now, we can only modify the global colour name (that's better!), but the name is "global colour x" instead of "Pantone 123 C".
There's no reason to have global colours named as "global colour x" when using nomenclatured colours as "Pantone 123 C".

And it's the same with any colour, in fact: the white triangle in the corner of the swatch is enough since the swatches are always visible in the palette, they should be name depending of colour values, unless we want to add "global" in the name, but this is a choice we should make.

 

For now, we have to add first the colour to the palette, and second to make it global if we want to keep the name, or add it global and rename it. It should be one in one step only.

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2020-06-28_084701.png.528f2c99d01f56a5e927adbe85e809cf.png

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Hi Wosven,

I don't believe there is a bug here (and is behaving the same between 1.8.3 and 1.8.4) and the design you're seeing is intentional and avoids producing work with incorrect Pantone names and values. Be aware that Pantone colours inside the application respond slightly different to regular global colours because of their special nature. I think your issue is all stemming from the bug that second and subsequent Pantone colours don't get added to the document's palette swatch.

Global Colours have a name, and if a Global Colour is marked as a spot (idenfied by a small dot in the bottom right of the swatch), that too can have a separate name (By default a spot will use the global colour's name). The purpose of this is that you use the Global Colour's name to be something to identify the colour in the application (normally to yourself), whereas the spot name is used to identify something to a printer (for example a specific area that identify to the printers to use a UV Gloss in that area).

Pantone colours have this spot name automatically filled in using the correct name based on the Pantone guides, however the user can still edit the Global Colour's name to be something more meaningful to them. So I might have a logo that uses PANTONE 117 CP, but I can rename this to help me identify where I've used this. So the name will look as follows:
image.png

If I then edit that Global Colour to be something else it will quite correctly remove the spot name, to avoid misinformation to the user and the printers.

Looking at your screenshots these new 'Pantone' colours you've made won't go out correctly as a spot colour to a PDF because they're no longer actual Pantone colours and are not marked as spots. 

I may have of course misunderstood what you're trying to demonstrate, if that is the case could you get upload a video of the process you're taking that does show the bug please? However please be aware that Global Colours and Spot Colours are not interchangeable:

Global Colours are colours that can be changed once for multiple objects.
Spot Colours is a flag enabled on a Global Colour that can output an identifying name to a PDF or Printer so it knows what ink to use.

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2 hours ago, Sean P said:

Global Colours have a name, and if a Global Colour is marked as a spot (idenfied by a small dot in the bottom right of the swatch), that too can have a separate name (By default a spot will use the global colour's name). The purpose of this is that you use the Global Colour's name to be something to identify the colour in the application (normally to yourself), whereas the spot name is used to identify something to a printer (for example a specific area that identify to the printers to use a UV Gloss in that area).

This is a wonderfully simple explanation of something that has confused me from the beginning.

I'm not sure I like it, but at least I understand now.

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