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denironaut

vertical and horizontal handles.

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http://theagsc.com/community/tutorials/so-whats-the-big-deal-with-horizontal-vertical-bezier-handles-anyway/

 

 

I stumbled upon this article recently, I'd like to know if anybody using designer follows this workflow, and if there are real benifits from being so strict with node placement. I never create any text, just general shapes.

 

Cheers

Craig.

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denironaut,

 

I cannot say that I follow this 'workflow' since, as a beginner, I do not really have a 'workflow'. But, again as a beginner, I have started to develop apparent 'habits'.

 

When first getting the program, having had absolutely zero experience in any programs such as this, I simply looked at the shapes that are made available by Affinity in the toolbar (such as the soft star) and noticed those nodes were all positioned on the 'corners' (that is how I saw it at the time - 'corners'). So, that is where I subsequently placed and positioned the majority of mine. 

Then I viewed CartoonMike's 'Pumpkin' tutorial and, after seeing his suggested method, tried that system. Since my mere 'observations' made from these two sources, I have practiced quite a bit and am somewhat more comfortable (although far from deft) with my decisions pertaining to my node placement. Yet, having gone back now (after your post) to look at the few projects that I had saved with history, I can see that a very large number of my nodes are coincidentally just as outlined in your link. It just happened to be so rather than being a 'strict' principle or any certain technique on my part.

 

My question to you then would be, if you are using some other determining method of node placement, what is it? Does one just get a 'feel' for it? I am always more than willing to learn - and, since I am so new to this, I am also actually quite teachable.      B) 

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Thank you for that link, Craig.  As a "painter" rather than designer, I'm still struggling with bezier curves.  Usually wind up throwing my hands up and walking off muttering at the point described in Fig 6.  Nice to have some idea of what I'm doing wrong now and how to fix it when I lose control.

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denironaut, I have been doing bezier curves for years and have never tried to follow such a workflow.  I find it hard to believe that this process would reduce the nodes in a design and still result in an identical curve.  I do agree that it would simplify trying to find the proper location for the nodes.  What happens when the object is rotated?  Or changed by a warp, or a perspective, or etc.  Is part of the HBVH workflow that it should never have these processes done, it should be redrawn instead?  That would sure make AD a lot easier for the team to develop.  What if you need a corner?  Maybe I missed that in the article, but it sounds to be prohibited.

 

For myself I look for transitions, where the line goes from curved to straight, CW curve to CCW curve, abrupt radius changes, corners of course.  But then I once in awhile for one reason or another have allowed the unthinkable of creating an S curve out of only two nodes by moving the handles in opposite directions when it produces the best curve of what I want. :o   If a corner is not wanted then make sure a smooth node is used (has handles locked straight across).  Some people only allow symmetrical nodes (the handles are equal length in addition to being straight) but I find that overly restrictive.  Drawing bezier curves can be extremely enjoyable, especially with a pen like the AD developers have created.

 

HBVH sounds like a mind game, which I have personally no problem with.  I myself have a mind game that allows only using vectors for drawing.  I never wander into the pixel persona.  Weird rule huh?  But if HBVH is a rule you want to impose on your drawing workflow and it makes the process more enjoyable then I say by all means HBVH it.  But I find it hard to believe that without showing the node locations that anyone could tell if the handles are HBVH or all kattywampus.  And in my final drawings a rule I always use is to never show the node locations.  ;)  And I don't believe your drawing will be any better because of an HBVH workflow.

 

The above stated opinion is exactly that, my opinion and by no means rules that everyone should be forced to live by.

 

Mike


iMac (27-inch, Late 2009) with macOS Sierra

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Thank you for that link, Craig.  As a "painter" rather than designer, I'm still struggling with bezier curves.  Usually wind up throwing my hands up and walking off muttering at the point described in Fig 6.  Nice to have some idea of what I'm doing wrong now and how to fix it when I lose control.

 

Hi LilleG, have you tried this? It's a devilishly simple tutorial...this is were my Eggies, were cast in those satanic mills known as AD.

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/5519-how-to-make-egg-shapes/?hl=egg

 

Bezier curves: think of them in two ways: 

 

1 A rigid plastic stencil, with numerous curves, that you draw around.

 

dsc00538.jpg

 

2 A flexible square tube, that you bend to shape, then pin to the drawing board with small pins, then you draw around.

16119-1108.jpg

 

Or failing that,

 

3 Look at these three chains. The anchor points (slits) are level and are the same distance apart. The chain length is shorter in the top one and longer at the lowest. The chain or curve's length is adjusted by pulling in or out extra links through the slit. If you want to make the chains lean to the left, then you would simply twist the card's bottom to the right. il_fullxfull.654147752_cduh.jpg

On screen you would simply teak the curve's grab handle and push/pull to the left or right, to get your desired effect.

 

HTH

 

peter

Edited by peter

MacBook pro, 2.26 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3, NVIDIA GeForce 9400M 256 MB, OS X 10.11.6

 

http://www.pinterest.com/peter2111

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Thanks, Peter.  All advice greatly appreciated.  I do practice and I usually do okay until i put a node too close to a corner and wind up watching it squirt off in unwanted directions when I try to adjust.  And at that point, any attempt at recovery usually makes it worse.  Which leads to the hand-flinging muttering.  Haven't had time to play with it today but I think the tip to move the node further away from the corner may solve that problem for me.  I did do the egg thing.  Such a clean and simple method!  I haven't given up.  My walk-aways are only temporary.  I do want to become capable with the pen and I know it takes practice.

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Trace an image with pencil and tracing paper. Scan or photo it. Open up AD, then get out your pen tool and using the pen and ink method, go over the pencil lines with the bezier curves.

 

This is my weapon of choice! :ph34r: And this was the theatre of war, where it took place.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/498703358711615714/

https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/2170-wip-family-guyairwolf-aka-shes-a-lady/


MacBook pro, 2.26 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3, NVIDIA GeForce 9400M 256 MB, OS X 10.11.6

 

http://www.pinterest.com/peter2111

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Thanks for checking That out. It's took a lot out of me, that was the most pen work, that I've ever done.

 

One idea that springs to mind is this...draw a pencil line around your hand.  Now digitze it. Then do this.

 

1 Draw a straight line (where you watch would go) from the left side of your wrist to the right. Then draw a loop (like a mitten outline) that goes around your hand. Add and adjust nodes to follow the finger and thumb oulines.

 

2 Draw a straight line (where you watch would go) from the left side of your wrist to the right. Then using a combination of straight lines and many, many curves. Create the outline that follows the hand's shape. Then select those nodes and join them together.

 

3 Or just download the pumpkin tutorial!

 

This can be done with a mouse...Phew!

Edited by peter

MacBook pro, 2.26 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3, NVIDIA GeForce 9400M 256 MB, OS X 10.11.6

 

http://www.pinterest.com/peter2111

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Lille, when doing a corner the trick is to place the nodes an equal distance back from the corner and have the handles pointing straight out as an extension of the line with the handles approximately the same length.

 

post-2932-0-22758800-1439038372_thumb.jpg

 

Then when you are pretty much done, if there are multiple objects select all or several of the objects.  While in the node tool, press cmd + A and it will show all node's handles at one time.  Scan to see that all curves that are supposed to be smooth should have handles that are all tangents of curves and/or straight out from straight lines.  Parallel curves should end up with parallel handles.

 

When drawing rounded corners it's handy to first use the pen tool to draw the object but with square corners.  Then using the node tool add nodes an equal distance back from the corners, where you want the curve to start.  Then delete the corner nodes.  Push on the center of the paths to approximately where you want them for the curve you desire (this will create the handles too).  Then press cmd + A and do a final adjustment of the handle's angles and lengths.

 

post-2932-0-68942800-1439040493_thumb.jpg

 

Practice is necessary.  I think you'll find that soon the pen is your favorite tool.


iMac (27-inch, Late 2009) with macOS Sierra

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Thanks, gearmaker.  You and everyone have been so helpful. I'm going to spend today practicing these suggestions.  That sounded like I thought one day would do it, huh?  I just meant that I'm going to start today.  And keep on until I can easily control the tool.  So thanks again, everyone.

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