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Nathalia

[new user] I only have tons of Blue to select on color picker

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I'm new to Affinity Photo|Designer and also new into the community, so Hiiii everyone! nice to meet you all! ahahahah

My little problem is this: my color picker (in both designer and photo) only give-me Blue-ish colors to pick, the images attached shows how it look like.

What I did so far: around 2 hours of google search, changed options, uninstalled both Designer and Photo and reinstalled them.

Any photo I open stay in this blueish, my color palette only show tons of blue/pick.

Guys, please help, I dunno what more I can do to fix this...

color1.png

color2.png

color3.png

color4.png

Edited by Nathalia

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Welcome to the Serif Affinity forums.

My guess would be that you have an incorrect color profile assigned to your display, in your OS color settings. What OS do you use? And what kind of display do you have?


-- Walt

Windows 10 Home, version 2004 (19041.388),
   Desktop: 16GB memory, Intel Core i7-6700K @ 4.00GHz, GeForce GTX 970
   Laptop:  8GB memory, Intel Core i7-3625QM @ 2.30GHz, Intel HD Graphics 4000 or NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M
Affinity Photo 1.8.5.703 and 1.9.0.734 Beta   / Affinity Designer 1.8.5.703 and 1.9.0.734 Beta  / Affinity Publisher 1.8.5.703 and 1.9.0.742 Beta.

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Hi!

I'm on windows10 64bit, my main monitor is an Asus VG248QE 1920x1080 144Hz, on windows I'm using a color profile which I did get from internet, I added three photos of the windows's color management showing the current setting.

My second monitor is a LG FULL HD 1920x1080, with no profile on it.

colorprofile2.png

colorprofile3.png

colorprofile1.png

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6 minutes ago, Nathalia said:

Removing the "VG248 Rtings calibration" solved the issue ^.^

Thanks for those links v_kyr, I'm already searching for another profile.

No no no. Generic profiles suck. You should calibrate your monitor - that will generate a profile for your specific monitor. Your monitor on your desk. More help here: https://affinityspotlight.com/article/display-colour-management-in-the-affinity-apps/


I gave up using Designer for hobby use - a "professional" vector drawing program without actual vector features. Customers waiting for five years in vain is more than any company can ask for. Maybe if Affinity Designer 2.0 gets real and advanced vector features I can use it. Until then... I am a customer, a potential upgrader and an active observer with an opinion. Currently I am slowly finishing a project I started in Designer.

Further... give up and please hire an UX (usability designer), Serif. It is how professional software is made in this century.

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55 minutes ago, Jowday said:

No no no. Generic profiles suck. You should calibrate your monitor

All fine and good, but what does she actually do if she actually doesn't have any calibration device/colourimeter flying around. - Usually the monitor vendor (Asus in her case) initially supplies some generic monitor profiles, which should work as a start up. Further her interest might be to actually first detect the cause of all evil, if it's a faulty profile or something else here at all. Thus she first should narrow down the cause, before spending efforts in an own monitor calibration. She can do that later anyway, though should be done carefully and ideally with the help of a good monitor calibration device!


☛ Affinity Designer 1.8.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.8.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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41 minutes ago, v_kyr said:

All fine and good, but what does she actually do if she actually doesn't have any calibration device/colourimeter flying around. - Usually the monitor vendor (Asus in her case) initially supplies some generic monitor profiles, which should work as a start up. Further her interest might be to actually first detect the cause of all evil, if it's a faulty profile or something else here at all. Thus she first should narrow down the cause, before spending efforts in an own monitor calibration. She can do that later anyway, though should be done carefully and ideally with the help of a good monitor calibration device!

If removing the previous monitor profile (VG248 Rtings calibration) solved the issue - "Removing the "VG248 Rtings calibration" solved the issue ^.^" there is no reason to go look for another profile on the net. I never found one for any monitor that actually had a positive effect.

 


I gave up using Designer for hobby use - a "professional" vector drawing program without actual vector features. Customers waiting for five years in vain is more than any company can ask for. Maybe if Affinity Designer 2.0 gets real and advanced vector features I can use it. Until then... I am a customer, a potential upgrader and an active observer with an opinion. Currently I am slowly finishing a project I started in Designer.

Further... give up and please hire an UX (usability designer), Serif. It is how professional software is made in this century.

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11 minutes ago, Jowday said:

...I never found one for any monitor that actually had a positive effect.

Usually the monitor vendor (Asus) should initially also have supplied a generic one for that factory batch of monitor type. - Though due to possible manufacturing variance (no two are really always the same) a custom individual calibration is of cause superior.

And no need to ask, the lucky guys of course always have a pro monitor with a built-in calibration function here (greetings from Eizo and NEC).


☛ Affinity Designer 1.8.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.8.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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11 hours ago, v_kyr said:

Usually the monitor vendor (Asus) should initially also have supplied a generic one for that factory batch of monitor type. - Though due to possible manufacturing variance (no two are really always the same) a custom individual calibration is of cause superior.

And no need to ask, the lucky guys of course always have a pro monitor with a built-in calibration function here (greetings from Eizo and NEC).

I have (desperately) tried so many of these generic profiles on various office monitors over the years. Showing my work on them is a nightmare with or without a generic profile. I don't know what the purpose of these generic profiles is exactly. Office work? Calibrating on of these same monitors factory set for office use pushed it away from the bluish, bright look gave me a warmer more pleasing look. And my photos and drawings did look okay.

I have an Eizo myself - no built-in calibration though - but calibrating the Eizo monitor doesn't change much in sRGB mode fx, its factory settings are rather precise and doesn't drift much. But I really, really think calibrating cheaper LG monitors away from youtube and office optimized factory defaults is more important for Affinity users.


I gave up using Designer for hobby use - a "professional" vector drawing program without actual vector features. Customers waiting for five years in vain is more than any company can ask for. Maybe if Affinity Designer 2.0 gets real and advanced vector features I can use it. Until then... I am a customer, a potential upgrader and an active observer with an opinion. Currently I am slowly finishing a project I started in Designer.

Further... give up and please hire an UX (usability designer), Serif. It is how professional software is made in this century.

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'Goedkoop is duurkoop', or you get what you pay for etc. Thus quality and good engineering technology has it's price and higher end monitors (like the better Eizos models for example) are no exception here, they are slightly different build in terms of internal monitor control, their capabilities and the overall service. - In contrast here mass market and cheap OEM monitors of course don't play in that same higher league and those also don't offer much in terms of a correct color behavior (calibrated or not). Thus it always also highly depends on the devices themself.

 


☛ Affinity Designer 1.8.3 ◆ Affinity Photo 1.8.3 ◆ OSX El Capitan

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... but they are not calibrated for designers or photo editing... even displaying... so even cheap monitors benefit.


I gave up using Designer for hobby use - a "professional" vector drawing program without actual vector features. Customers waiting for five years in vain is more than any company can ask for. Maybe if Affinity Designer 2.0 gets real and advanced vector features I can use it. Until then... I am a customer, a potential upgrader and an active observer with an opinion. Currently I am slowly finishing a project I started in Designer.

Further... give up and please hire an UX (usability designer), Serif. It is how professional software is made in this century.

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