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Hi Folks,

I'm trying to understand where I make a mistake:
I create a CMYK doc with Fogra 39 profile, I place in the layout some RGB images, some texts, colored and 100K and a couple of boxes filled with other colors.
When I export them I try to change the ICC to Fogra 29 or SWOP. 
I expect images to have different CMYK values... and it happens. 
However this changes also the vector boxes and text, so "Numbers" aren't preserved.
Worst of all, also the 100%K comes on CMYK values.
I tested some different setup, but when I change profile, numbers aren't preserved at all. Strange.
Cannot find a way out of this.
Someone could be so kind to explain me what I am doing wrong and how to fix it?
Thanks a lot!

 

G:

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Color management in Affinity apps can get confusing, and if you are familiar with Adobe apps, it does not work similarly.

To keep things simple, let us assume that you have created you publication in CMYK/8 color mode and have Coated Fogra 39 as its initial color profile. Then you import some sRGB images (which immediately lose their RGB vividness once imported so you do not have the kind of dual color space as you have in e.g. InDesign -- unless you switch between the document color modes), and define K100 text, and some CMYK shapes. If you have the lock icon turned on when you define the CMYK values (with sliders), the color mode the color was originally defined for the object will be remembered which might be useful to avoid inadvertent change of object color spaces, but its operation has remained more or less obscure to me. But it is probably best to leave it closed in its default state. A better way to control your object colors is creating a document palette and create swatches and see that objects have swatch color assignments. 

Once you have your colors and objects ready do the following:

1) Export using PDF/X-1a:2003 and you should get the sRGB images in CMYK color and all CMYK definitions unchanged as they are in the document.

2) Export using PDF/X-1a:2003 but modify the settings by specifying Uncoated Fogra 29 as the color profile, and the RGB images will be converted differently, as will most of the CMYK values, including K100 which has changed to four-color black. So the values indeed are not retained. But this is by design, and you get similar results if you use Edit > Convert Color Profile in InDesign or do the similar thing in Illustrator. One important difference: InDesign's [Black] is fixed to K100 and will not change when you make this kind of conversion (however in Illustrator, K100 will change). So there is no equivalent in Affinity apps to InDesign's export time "Keep values" conversion.

3) If you want to change the color profile but keep the color values, you need to choose File > Document Setup, choose your color profile (e.g. Uncoated Fogra 29) and click "Assign" (NOT "Convert"). Now your existing CMYK definitions should be retained, including K100, and when you export using PDF/X-1a:2003 with its default values (meaning that the current document color profile, now Uncoated Forgra 29, is used for conversion of RGB and conflicting CMYK image colors, and embedded), while the CMYK definitions of document (vector and text) objects are retained.

This gets more complex if you have RGB color definitions (beyond the CMYK color gamut), or if your document color mode is sRGB to start with. CMYK values/appearance of the RGB based colors will change also when you change color profile by assignment (as you can see from the RGB photos).

Because of unwanted change of K100 to four-color black at export time profile conversion (in lack of "Keep color values" kind of conversion of InDesign), you should do these kinds of conversions by using File > Document Setup, choosing the Convert option. Note though that this will break your swatch assignments because swatch values are not converted (as they are in InDesign). All your CMYK colors will change, as they should (to reflect the change of media, so the uncoated values have lesser total ink coverage), but K100 will, too, but at least you can now change your black text back to K100 (using e.g. Find/Change).

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Woah, thanks, that's an answer!
I will test every single solution you provide me. I'm gonna understand it better.

Sure that the process is not so linear and logic as it should be. Can't understand why…
Thanks again Lagarto!

 

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OK, I did some test:
All what you suggested is true and has a certain sense.
But most of all, it works and that's it.
It is not so linear, because the Assign/Convert is counterintuitive, as well as the lock on the color slider palette.
However, knowing what to do make easy to adapt.
Hope that in the near future Affinity will smooth that particular. Color management is fundamental nowadays!
Thanks again for your precious help, it makes things clear!

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Affinity devs should definitely straighten the procedures, after all there a clearly some results which are desired and commonly wanted, and others that are not useful at all. Software should offer help to achieve the usual wanted results and warn if selections would result unwanted results like not-100K text/vectors.

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Other thing is overprint
I'm experimenti a 50%K Titel tex over a Yellow Background. 
Can't put it on overprint unless to apply a "Multiply" effect.
It sounds weird to me… however, it works…

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44 minutes ago, Gianni_S said:

I'm experimenti a 50%K Titel tex over a Yellow Background. 
Can't put it on overprint unless to apply a "Multiply" effect.

You should be able to do it but I think you first need to have a global swatch:

overprint.jpg.94d7945e09a45d9db581102435125406.jpg

 

EDIT: Oops, forgot the tint...Fixed now (and also added direct K50 definition in addition to tint method)

overprint.pdf

 

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35 minutes ago, Gianni_S said:

Same way I found… but global colors have the same meaning like Illustrator?

Basically yes If you have assigned global colors to objects, you can change their coloring in one go by modifying the color. They can also serve as parents for tints so when you change the parent, the tints are adjusted accordingly. But you cannot make a tint a global swatch because it then looses its parenthood.

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