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Just purchased AP, and have been going thru the video tutorials (which are helpful so far.)  When opening a RAW file Making adjustments is fairly intuitive.  (

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My question is when I'm done editing the RAW file to end the session to I click on the DEVELOP button (top right corner)?  If yes, are the adjustments permanent (destructive) to the original RAW file?  If yes, please advise how to make non permanent edits to the original RAW file.  Do you see a RESET button in your future (ala LR)?

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As far as I understand you will be prompted to save your developed file as a new file - so it's kind of non-destructive.

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I'm sure it's non-destructive to the original raw file as it makes no sense to actually edit the photo site data in a raw file. Clicking Develop, I expect, creates a pixel image from the raw file. Raw files don't contain RGB pixels so it would be difficult and unnecessary to apply edits to the raw data in the original file.

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Thanks totoff & coranda.  I'll drill a little deeper.  I did a save, which gave me a file with an Affinity Photo file extension name that was 6 times the RAW file size.  So obviously I need to learn a bit more.

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It increases in file size because it goes from basically a black and white image and gets converted through a demosaicing process to a color image with 3 channels.

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Thanks Jim.  I won't even to pretend to understand what you said.  :huh:

At the end of the day, if all AP files sizes are multiple times the size of the RAW file, it eventually becomes a storage issue/concern.

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The image is recorded in the camera as something resembling a black and white image (think single channel). The demosiacing process converts the image by splitting up the original data into 3 separate color channels (R,G,B) which when combined create the color image. So in basic terms, you multiple the amount of data in the RAW by 3 (it's not exactly 3 but that explains the concept) since it's being split up.

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