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dasigna

Proof printing with Publisher is really a mess - wrong colors!

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has anybody tried to proof a document with publisher?

currently getting mad with this! having a dedicated rip i am trying to get an accurate proof out of affinity publisher with no effort.

publisher seems not to be able to skip any color profile when printing - even when setting that colors are to be managed by printer, theres still a selection for a color profile that obviously interferes with the print and leads to wrong colors.

is there ANY way to tell Publisher NOT to use any profile when printing to the rip???

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2 minutes ago, MikeW said:

Use Acrobat or Adobe Reader perhaps? I don't print directly from any native application.

Alternatively, does your RIP handle pdfs directly?

use both - but not for printing.

rip is registered as a printer and creates its own .ps-files.

works with every native application just completely fine - except from affinity 😕

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9 minutes ago, dasigna said:

use both - but not for printing.

rip is registered as a printer and creates its own .ps-files.

works with every native application just completely fine - except from affinity 😕

I don't think Affinity applications can bypass using a profile while printing direct. Dunno, but I haven't delved much into it.

Which would go back to my suggestion. But hey, if you don't want to try and see if that resolves the issue, fine...

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1 hour ago, dasigna said:

s there ANY way to tell Publisher NOT to use any profile when printing to the rip???

I once had a test run where I used my PostScript printer driver to get CMYK output from Affinity Publisher (via Printer dialog box printing to file), similarly as I can do from within Acrobat Pro or Adobe Photoshop, but could not manage to get other than RGB data. I did not continue with my experiments as they did not seem to lead anwhere. 

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I use a "generic CMYK profile" (part of Corel Draw, haven't used Corel for years, but this profile is my precious, I guard it with my life) for all printing and it works well -- all CMYK colours are outputted (put out?) exactly as set up and other colours are converted.

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12 hours ago, Patrick Connor said:

That is not a way to create CMYK files.

no? which way then?

creating .pdfs and proof them, which doubles the amount of work?
using a dedicated rip with calibrated printer and have to trick again - really?

i have a document in cmyk.
printer output should be possible with that...
every other application i use can manage to print to a postscript printer and let it manage colors ... illustrator, indesign and even corel (!). in every program printer profile is then deactivated by default. works well and gives the expected results. (which then are even identical across all apps by the way...) why not affinity??

quite stunning! (if not weird)

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Sorry to confuse I have just tagged Lagarto in that reply, as I was clarifying he should not expect CMYK files out of a postscript print path, as the Affinity print path is always RGB, (with no postscript exception).

19 minutes ago, dasigna said:

...why not affinity??

Printing of CMYK colours "as is" is not provided free by the operating systems, where for printer drivers only RGB colours are understood and so this postscript exception requires a lot of extra programming, that the Affinity range has not implemented.It is unfortunate that desktop printer drivers do not allow the colourspace to be specified, and for CMYK data to be sent through normal print commands, but they never have. "Postscript pass through" is a frig to get round this driver implementation issue.

There is nothing wrong with proofing on a printer but be aware that it will be converted to RGB and back and so some colours outside the RGB range are not going to proof well, unless using CMYK end to end, like ripping directly from a generated PDF X-4 file.

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o.k.
i do know, that desktop printers always are rgb. so for cmyk-proofing colors are emulated. otherwise we wouldnt need any rip-software and expensive calibration things ...

so in my case the rip acts as a postscript printer that generates its own .ps-files for printing then.
normal setting is to leave color conversion up to 'printer' and not to change cmyk-values - in every application. that is fu**** easy with also fu**** great results of 99,8% accuracy.

so if i understand the answer of patrick correctly - affinity simply cant do this! right?

so for affinity i have to output some .pdf print file and send this to the softrip via printing though acrobat ...?

rip cant handle .pdfs directly - only its own .ps files (efi_express btw.)

 

so in my understanding it would help already if color management through affinity simply would be deactivated automatically if one set 'leave color management up to printer' ... or even if it could be deactivated manually.

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