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pamchao

Exported JPG or PNG is not showing clear lines

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Hello, can someone take a look at these files and let me know what would be the best way to export the file. The exported image detail is not as crisp when exporting and I'm not sure if there are any other settings that I can use to export. When viewing through Affinity Designer, it is showing the detail without any issues (see the bow in the .jpg file and compare to the screenshot directly from my screen). The curves are not showing crisp lines and blow out when exporting. Any ideas?

Symphony_Campaign4b.jpg

Symphony_Campaign4b.afdesign

SharedScreenshot.jpg

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How is this document going to be used, printed, web, both?


iMac 27" Late 2015 Fully Loaded, iMac 27" Mid 2011 both running High Sierra 10.13.6 - Affinity Designer/Photo & Publisher - Illustrator CC, Inkscape, Blender, Sketchup, Pepakura Designer, MTC, Pixelmator & Pixelmator Pro + more... XP-Pen Artist-22E, - iPad Pro 12.9 B|  

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It gets rasterized at as high resolution as specified, at least when exporting to PDF. Here is a screenshot of a PDF exported at 600dpi and zoomed in and cropped from the area of the "bow".

bow.jpg.2611a77d9c547ee354453f46f508f1db.jpg

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Note though that the TIFF image used as the source of the texture for the "violin" building text, while itself a large enough bitmap, would get rendered at as low as 36ppi resolution if using a setting that allows resampling down of bitmaps (default when using 300dpi export setting would be placed graphics that exceeds 450 ppi).

That is because the same image is used (it seems) three times as the texture of vector masks, and in some instances its placed resolution might exceed 450ppi, while in other instances not. If such an image gets scaled down because of a single instance, it would result in rendering warnings in instances where bigger resolution of the image is needed.

Therefore there might be point in not allowing resampling down when exporting the final PDF for the printer. I tested exporting with the PDF/X-1a, which also converts the violin bitmap to CMYK, using the default resolution of 300dpi, and it produced a fine PDF that did not cause any resolution warnings, so I'd use this export format when delivering the job.

PS. Nice constuction you have here! Did you create it right from the start in Designer?

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If you instead need to create web graphics of this, and keep file size reasonable, I'd use JPG at 85% quality setting. It would produce as 2560x1440 at 777KB, and would tolerate moderate zooming in:

Symphony_Campaign4b.thumb.jpg.30be597762f56515a001a238cd5f06d1.jpg

That would alleviate the problem of vector edges getting rasterized without antialiasing. They would be jaggy in any resolution when zoomed in beyond 100%, and I do not know if it can be avoided somehow. 

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Oversampling first to somewhere around 5120 x 2880 and then downsampling using bicubic linear to smooth out would allow using lower resolution bitmap (and accordingly smaller file size), like this (this is 1000x563 at 85% JPG compression, filesize  238KB): 

Symphony_Campaign4b_oversampled.jpg.3216f7b2b45cced93cc9f37e308cbdbd.jpg

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Thank you so much for the quick replies, Lagarto! I tried the oversampling method and it looked better. Let me know if this is somewhat correct:

  1. Resize the document to 5120 x 2880 with all the curves scaling up.
  2. Click "Export", then select the JPG, then on the resample dropdown, select "bicubic"
  3. Export JPG

Thank you, yes, I created this on AD from scratch. A lot of figuring out how to execute it and ended up using my favorite clipping method, instead of recoloring it.

Symphony_Campaign - Perfectly Orchestrated Living v2.jpg

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7 minutes ago, pamchao said:

I tried the oversampling method and it looked better. Let me know if this is somewhat correct:

Ah, sorry, I actually just meant that from your original art (which was in vector format and already had a good-quality image of violin for the texture), you'd just first create a larger bitmap without compression, e.g. in PNG format (at least 5,120 x 2,880) but could well be over 10,000 px wide, and then open that PNG image (preferrably in Photo) and downsample it to the final size bitmap (in JPG format if you definitely need to have compact file size but otherwise in PNG format, since JPG compression is basically bad for gradients or subtle shift of tones / transparencies). 

That resolves the problem with the vectorized letter edges becoming so sharp and jagged when producing the bitmap directly in final dimensions. Resampling down with bicubic method smooths (antialiases) the edges. If it becomes too smooth, you could apply a bit unsharp mask sharpening and finally check the levels (the most recent screenshot might be a bit too dark or contrasted, but looks generally just brilliant)! How large will the final art be (I assume it will be used only as web graphics, or are you going to print this, too)?

I think you'd need to have Photo (or some other app for bitmap manipulation) for sharpening. But if you do not have it, it is not a big deal, the image looks jst fine as it is. Just compare the final image in PNG and JPG format and see if compression has (clearly discernible) negative effect, and use PNG if possible (considering the filesize).

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