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rnmartinez

Why Affinity on Linux Makes Sense - and how it could be soft-launched.

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I fully understand the complexity of porting to Linux - you need to support various distros, and tech support could be challenging with so many variables - distroes, DEs, kernels, etc... 

I think that Ubuntu 20.04 LTS represents an excellent opportunity to create for an OS that will have a guaranteed 5 years of support, and which will form the base for distros such as Pop OS and Mint. It is not perfect, but likely an easier way to segue into the Linux World.

But why would you want this on Linux? Or why would a user?

Because, we want a stable, secure, high performing Affinity environment. This isn't about Windows, MacOS or even Linux, it is about your product. Think about the rise of apps. No one really cares if they are Android or iOS - they want a great, focused experienced. I want to use the Affinity Suite without distractions. I want Affinity more than I want any OS. I want to use your product effectively, efficiently, and without headaches.

So why Linux? Because it is the lesser of 3 evils. I do not want the distraction of Windows update, pop ups, ads in my start menu (!), I want to work. I do not want to live in front of my computer, waiting for an update that cripples 800 million workstations, or that kills my performance, or takes away features. On top of that, I do not want the added support/license costs, and security issues. While macOS solves many of these issues, cost is certainly a factor. It becomes very difficult for a small studio or publisher (such as myself) to roll out multiple macOS workstartions. Especially when all I want is a web browser, google docs and Affinity.

I think that I am not alone; people may not necessarily be after a catch all linux port, but rather a better Affinity experience, that doesn't come with strings attached because of the underlying OS.   

Look at what Steam did - they went as far as creating their own Linux distro. Do not be surprised if Adobe does the same down the road - an Ubuntu LTS based iso that boots into a barebones desktop optimized for their suite or products - essentially an App type experience on the desktop.

That is not to say you need to go down this road, but supporting one distro (such as Ubuntu 20.04 LTS), with an experience maximized for your products is in users' best interest. While it is easy to underestimate the interest in Linux, I would not underestimate interest for Affinity focused workstations. 

I am glad to discuss this further, and I am sure that many other Affinity users are as well.

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