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Found 6 results

  1. When I place an Affinity Designer graphic with several creative text instances (some left- and some right-justified) all text is shown as left-justified. The graphic is made with Designer 1.6.5.123 and is displayed correctly in Designer itself.
  2. Hello I'd like to stress the need for a (very) good justification engine in Affinity Publisher, in order to produce high quality text-heavy publications. Because I'm not sure what the status on microtypography in Publisher currently is, I'll drop this info for your consideration. In the 1990's type designer Hermann Zapf and engineer Peter Karow developed the Hz-program, a justification engine which has gained a somewhat mythological status. Its algorithm combines multiline composing, hanging punctuation with word-spacing, letter-spacing and most controversial: glyph-scaling. Adobe has bought the patent, but it's not known whether they actually use the program in InDesign. You can however change most of these parameters (word-spacing, letter-spacing and glyph-scaling) in the justification engine in InDesign with a minimum, maximum and optimal amount. In my opinion, a paragraph composer with these settings, combined with extensive hyphenation settings are an absolute must for professional typographers. Some sources on this topic: - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microtypography - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hz-program - http://www.typografi.org/justering/gut_hz/gutenberg_hz_english.html Thanks for your consideration!
  3. Applying the "no break" option results in text expanding beyond the text frame. Happening since 1.7.0.58 version.
  4. I have got to be doing something terribly wrong with tabs. I cannot figure out how to use them. I have used so many programs over the years and have never had so much trouble. The only way I can see to add a tab is under paragraphs in the tab section. I can click on the little + tab and it creates a tab, but there is no rhyme or reason to the length. If I select the right justify and want it at say 3 inches and I have a three inches text box it breaks to a new line. If I shorten it, it does not go to the right edge. That is if the justification button even work. The the leaders do not show up.
  5. I was pleased to see that Designer has the usual six fields for justification: minimum, desired, and maximum for letter spacing and word spacing. However, letter spacing can't be set below 0%. This makes sense for word spacing, but minimum letter spacing is usually a negative value in justified text. I just checked in Illustrator and word spacing can range from 0% to 1000% while letter spacing allows -100% to 500%. Also useful (if typographically unwise) is a third row: glyph scaling. In Illustrator, this can range from 50% to 200%.
  6. Hey guys, I've noticed what I believe is a bug—a client requested using justified text instead of FLRR, so I gave it a shot. It condensed the text a bit too much, so I bumped up the minimum word spacing percentage to about 150% in the Paragraph -> Justification panel, and fairly often, this results in words being cut in half, with a stray first letter being left on the line above. Seemingly only way around it is just adding blank spaces in to move the character to the next line.
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