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Found 14 results

  1. In an attempt to get my head around Publisher’s PDF export behavior (compared to Adobe’s which I’m rather familiar with), I stumbled upon this thread which only touches some of my problems: Some settings in the export process (under File > Export > PDF > More) don’t seem fully developed yet, so I hope to find some clarity here: PDF/X-1a: The standard only allows CMYK and spot colors, so the options “As document” and “Grayscale” don’t make much sense, right? PDF/X-4: The standard allows several color models, but if I want to output CMYK-only (despite enjoying other X-4 possibilities), then I’d expect the option “CMYK” to yield a CMYK-only PDF. This only happens as expected if I choose to “rasterize everything” which is never a true option with my kind of projects. In other words: Why can I choose between three options when according to standards there’s only one possible result (= X-1a), and why is there only one result when according to standards there would be at least three options (and Publisher lets me even choose) (= X-4)? What part of the story did I miss, or am I just too deep into Adobe thinking to realize that what’s going on here is perfectly reasonable? Or is it really? Is it like “take it or leave it” – if I want CMYK-only files, I have to deal with losing transparencies and all in X-1a, and if I want e.g. transparency maintained, I have to accept all other X-4 possibilities not as options but as obligations? I admit I’m very used to (and have grown very fond of) the Adobe approach of being able to throw anything into a layout regardless of resolution, color model, file format, and ICC profile – and only having to decide in the very last seconds what to get on the far end. Thanks a lot for any insight!
  2. I find it hard to understand the effects that color profiles have on the colors of images in Affinity Photo. A raw image opened in Photo looks de-saturated, compared to DXO and preview in Irfanview. The JPEG from the camera looks better, but less saturated than shown in other software, like Firefox, Paint.net and Irfanview. Perhaps some setting of Photo overrides the data from the image? When developing the image I assign the ROMM RGB profile. From what I understand this profile keeps the highest number of colors available during editing. Is this true? After making adjustments I export the image as JPEG to use on Instagram and my website: during export choose the sRGB color profile and embed it. Other software like the Windows Explorer preview, Windows Photos, Irfanview and Firefox show the exported image more saturated then I see during editing. first convert the image by changing the color profile of the document to sRGB. Then exporting it the same way. Now the image is also more saturated then shown in Photo, but less than in option 1. What do I need to do differently to have the colors of the exported image match the colors I see during editing? This happens on a Windows machine with the color profile of the display set to the profile that came with the monitor.
  3. Hi all, the link to the original post can be found at the bottom of this posting. I am reposting here as I believe it is a bug and no one has taken an effort answering the original post in the questions and answers forum, so hoping to have more luck getting answers by posting in here instead. To summarise: There is a huge discrepancy in the soft proof results between Affinity Photo, Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom when using Relative Colorimetric, Perpetual or Saturation rending intents on the same images. The differences are so large that in my opinion seemingly Affinity Photo doesn't even attempt to bring the out of gamut colours to the nearest possible colour based on rendering intent. To illustrate what is going on please see below image comparing the result between the three applications and rendering intents on the same image. As you can see the Adobe products are both producing near identical results while Affinity Photo seeming does nothing, making it very difficult to trust what I see when soft proofing in Affinity Photo. Also attached here are a selection of ICC profiles I've tested with (including the icc profile used in the chart above), different printers doesn't seem to matter either, so I am sure it's not a profile issue, rather an application issue. Profiles are Hahnemüehle and Canson profiles for Epson printers. HFA_Eps3000_MK_PhotoRag.icc HFA_EpsSC-P800_MK_PhotoRag.icc HFA_EpsSC-P8000_MK_PhotoRag.icc cifa_p800_baryta310_p_bk.icc cifa_p800_edition310_m_bk.icc cifa_p800_ragphot310_m_bk.icc HFAPhoto_Eps4880_PK_HahnemuehlePhotoPearl.icc HFAPhoto_EpsSC-P800_PK_HahnemuehlePhotoPearl310.icc HFAPhoto_EpsSC-P800_PK_HahnemuehlePhotoSilkBaryta310.icc I have also tested across several images with the above profiles and results are consistent, the Adobe products brings colours as much as it can into gamut of the destination media profiles colour space, while Affinity Photo for the most part shows no difference between any of the rendering intents. I should note that on some images I do get an acceptable result, (all depending on the information in the image obviously), however when compared to Lightroom or Photoshop there is still a slight difference and most of the times the difference are too great to ignore, at least to me, as illustrated in the chart above. My expectation is that Affinity Photo would compresses the colours to the nearest possible colours in the destination profiles colour space when using Relative, Perceptual or Saturation rending intents as explained in this Affinity Photo video; https://vimeo.com/152413642 Thanks. Software versions used: Affinity Photo: 1.6.7 Photoshop: CC 19.1.5 Lightroom: 6.14 standalone Link to original post can be found here:
  4. Hi, I've calibrated my scanner using the X-Rite i1 Studio and that resulted in a ICC profile. The profile is saved in the same place as my printer and display profiles (C:\Windows\System32\spool\drivers\color) but when I choose Document->Assign ICC profile in Affinity Photo 1.6.5.123 my printer and display profiles are there but not my scanner profile. When I do the same in Photoshop CC 2018 I get a very long list of profiles including my scanner profile, why? Best regards Nicke
  5. I use Affinity Phote (1.6.4.104) on an Acer Notebook with Windows 10 and an attached wide gamut monitor (EIZO CS2420). The screens are profiled with i1 display. The bug is, that Photo always displays colors in relation to the profile of the first monitor. Im my environment this is the notebook screen with a sRGB profile. So Photo treats the wide gamut monitor like a sRGB monitor. Conequently Photo displays colors on the wide gamut monitor over saturated. I could verify the assumption by activating an ICC profile with interchanged color channels, which delivers a very strong effect (red becomes green). The attached screen copy shows the EIZO display. In the color configuration of Windows the EIZO has a measured profile, the notebook monitor has a profile with interchanges color channels. Workaround: Since I use the Notebook to display the picture browser, true color is not so important here, The workaround is to give the notebook display the same color profile as the wide gamut monitor. Consequently I have correct colors on the EIZO, but under saturated colors on the notebook. Hope for a future bug fix: Photo should be able to detect on which screen it is running and pick the correct color profile from the windows color configuration.
  6. Hi, Could you help me with some questions below regarding using ICC profiles: 1. I can "Assign ICC profile" or add layer with "Soft Proof Adjustment". Do I get exactly the same result When I use the same ICC profile in each of these two options? Are there any differences/implications in further work with photo when use each of these options? 2. There are different lists of available profiles in "Assign ICC profile" and "Soft Proof Adjustment". Why? 3. How can I sort (by names) profiles on the list of ICC profiles for "Soft Proof Adjustment"? 4. Is it possible to switch off using default profile (U.S. Web Coated) just when I open "Soft Proof" window? I want to pick target profile on the list and look how it changes photo from source profile (change from U.S. Web Coated isn't interested)? 5. Can I watch photo with applied two different profiles in two separate indows side by side? Best regards Tomek
  7. Hi everyone! I've been looking into the possibilities with the Affinity suite, and whilst it's all very promising I do have one question regarding matters of an ICC profile nature. I suspect a fair few of you will either work alongside or will have transitioned from Photoshop, and one quite invaluable facility is the capacity to spot read the ink density of a CMYK image to meet with overall percentage limits for print saturation, which in my case tends to usually be 240%. Is there any such sampling tool in the Affinity suite which I'm missing, or a known adjustment layer process (maybe via soft proof) within Affinity by which you can ensure that your ink levels don't exceed that percentage space?
  8. When opening images that do not have assigned ICC profiles, I do not always see a warning that Affinity Photo has assigned the working space profile to the image. This has created a fair bit of confusion for me today, because I was trying to detach the ICC profile from an image using the Export function, but when I opened the exported image to check that this had succeeded, it was being presented to me as if it still had an embedded profile. (I actually wrote a bug report for the Export function having a broken ICC profile attachment option, but when I double checked reproducibility before posting, I discovered that it was the import warning that was broken not the Export). What I am seeing is: Affinity Photo never displays the Assigned Profile warning for the first imaged opened, only for subsequent images opened. By "first" and "subsequent", I do not mean "one image after the other" but "multiple images open at once". So, you only get the warning for the image you are opening if another image is already open. A single image opened by itself in the workspace never triggers the warning. This leads to the impression that an image has an embedded profile when it has none. Some individual images never trigger the warning under any circumstances. I am not sure why they would be different. The bugs mentioned here seem to apply when opening images by dragging and dropping them from File Explorer into the Affinity Photo application window. The warning seems to work fine when images are opened with the File, Open... menu item. This then is the "workaround": always use the File, Open... menu. I am also wondering if it really is better for workflow to conflate the concepts of "attaching a profile to an image" and "displaying an unprofiled image using the current working space", because if one does not want the image to have an ICC profile assigned, one has to take an extra step to remove it because AP always forces you to attach one.
  9. When "Use document profile" is selected in the export menu, the profile is not embedded with the image. It just defaults to sRGB no matter what the document profile is. I tested this with PNG and JPEG exports. When I export a document that uses Adobe RGB, the profile on the image is sRGB. If I go into the export settings and specifically change the ICC profile to Adobe RGB, it exports correctly and the image has Adobe RGB embedded.
  10. Hello, The 1.4 upgrade was a good one. I have imported a new profile from Blurb with the correct suffix but it doesn’t appear in the list when I try to apply. Any ideas? Being very experienced with PSD I don’t find doing most tasks in Affinity too difficult to pick up after going through the tutorials. At the moment I think Select > Colour Range isn’t too useful due to the lack of any adjustments. Duncan
  11. OSX El Capitan Steps: 1. Have two color corrected screens, each with it's proper profile assigned. 2. Go to settings and give monitor 1 the menu bar - making it the main monitor. 3. Launch Affinity Photo. 4. Open a photo document ( in my case I used a document with Adobe RGB color space ) 5. If on the main monitor, the colors will be accurate. 6. Move the entire AP interface over to monitor two - or create a new view, separate the interface and move view 2 to monitor 2. 7. The color on monitor 2 view is wrong. It still uses monitor 1's color profile. 8. Quit affinity photo. 9. Go back to settings - make monitor 2 the main monitor by moving over the menu bar. 10. Repeat steps 3 through 7. The same thing happens but with the monitor's reversed. Basically, the main's monitor color profile is the only one being used. Thank you. Andres
  12. I'd like to be able to remove the colour profile from a document, you can add or convert in Photo - but not remove a profile - which is helpful when working for the web and screen.
  13. I understand that future enhancements are planned to Photo printing capabilities, and that at present the OSX system print dialogue is the way to go. In the mean time is any guidance available on getting the best from the current print capability? In particular it would be good to understand how the ICC profile menu options work and how these might affect the print result or help with proofing and setting rendering intent. A short video tutorial on this aspect would be useful.
  14. Hi everybody, I'm working with Affinity Designer for some weeks now but I'm new in this forum. Just a question: is there a way to add some more color profiles, apart from those already included inside Affinity Designer? Or, if not, is this something that will be included sometimes in future? I would like to have all my illustrations and files color managed the same way, despite they've been designed inside or outside Affinity Designer. And I don't like to make too many conversions through color profiles since you can lose precious info while converting from profile A to profile B. I really like Affinity Designer, can't wait to be able to also manage Pantone colors and to export using standards for PDF like PDF/X etc Best Maurizio
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