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Found 4 results

  1. As demostrated by the image below (three rectangles, two of them blurred, and four pixel brush dots with soft edges) Affinity designer and Affinity photo handle transparency and blending in a mathematically erroneous manner. It is wrong because blended areas are darker than any of the blended colors. Here is a friendly video by MinutePhysics that explains what I think is going on and how to fix it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKnqECcg6Gw
  2. raymondemery

    Shading with Gaussian Blur

    I've been focusing on shaing and coloring techniques in Affinity Designer lately. With this Blue Cobalt Shot Glass, I used gaussian blur, layer blending modes (Color Burn and Average) and opacity to acheive the effect that I was looking for. What methods would you use? UPDATE 3/15/2015 Thank you for all of the great input. I'm including the following to this post: The original image I used for inspiration My .afdesign file so you can see the layers Further Explanation (What I was trying to acheive) My goal was to make this illustration as "real" as possible. I've been expirementing with Gaussian blur, gradients, blending modes and opacity to acheive realistic highlights and shading. blue_cobalt_glass_RE.afdesign
  3. retrograde

    Digital painting in Designer

    Hi all, just some doodling here trying out painting inside of shapes in Designer. Started playing with Paolo's blender brushes he so graciously created. When using them in conjunction with the smudge tool you get some really nice mixing abilities. In the call out shape for instance I painted a mixture of the 2 main colours then applied some "blending" using one of Paolo's spatter blend brushes. It just spatters using the underlying colour and doesn't put any new colour down. Changing the size of the brush changes the size of the texture it paints. For the eyeball, (I didn't start out to do an eye it just ended up that way) I used a mix of painting and blending especially in the white of the eye with the blood vessels and texturing... then in the iris I painted inside the circle shape laying in the colour in the general areas and using Paolo's blenders to really gave it a nice complex feel. I usually add a .01 gaussian blur to take the hard edge off the shapes. it tends to soften the paint work a bit but it's a reasonable trade off. On the donut-pie shape I was just playing with a nice painterly play of light and shadow. The blenders are great for adding that "painterly" feel with tons of control. Again by reducing the blender brush size the blend effect gets smaller and more precise. This is all in Designer, which for me is probably where I will spend most of my time. The fact that I can get these type of results in a "vector" app is incredible. The hardest part of all of this is knowing when to stop! :D
  4. If you take a dark image and apply a Gaussian blur to an entire image, you will see light grey leaking in around the edges, as the blur apparently includes blank pixels. You can see this to the left and right of the enclosed image. I suggest you use the same techniques you use for your inpainting brush to generate a extra area around the image that you apply the blur to, cropping the result back to the selected area. This will then blur the whole image without undesirable side effects.
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