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Found 7 results

  1. John Rostron

    Fair Amaryllis

    This is the time of year that Amaryllis (aka Hippeastrum) bulbs burst into flower. This is the second flower from one bulb. The first has rather gone over and the third is not quite open. I photographed this full face using 13 images in a stack, focusing on the tip of the stigma and progressively down into the throat of the flower. I found that using the jpegs resulted in the white parts of the petals being rather blown out, so I used the original raw (awr) files. Using the merge, I cropped it, then duplicated it and made a selection of the flower itself and deleted it. I then inverted the selection and applied a Layer > New Live Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur with Preserve Alpha selected. Restoring the flower from the bottom layer gave the finished image. John
  2. My first test on focus stack. The speed of processing was impressive since the working space was set to prophoto-16 bit. It took only a few minutes to complete 25 images alignment and stacking. To compare, one single frame and the final stacked image are enclosed. Only minimal editing (curves and USM) is done on the stack. The output is very good. Soon I will be testing with 70 to 160 images taken with microscope objectives. Camera- Nikon D3100, Lens Tamron 90mm Macro, f18, 1/3 sec, ISO 200. This is the final stack. The image below is one of the 25 frames.
  3. macro enthusiast

    Focus merge work bad

    1-Affinity 2-Combine ZP 3-Combine ZP crop oryginal size
  4. Hi, Please compare the first two attached items, which are the final outputs of a focus stack. 1+2+3+4: VS :A+B (i.e. [1+2] + [3+4]) Here's what's going on: 1+2+3+4.png is a focus stacked image from 1.jpg, 2.jpg, 3.jpg, & 4.jpg >> The result is blurry, so I tried dividing the task to help the alignment algorithm. A (1+2).png is a focus stack using only photo 1 & 2, while B (3+4).png is one using 3 & 4. >> These 2 intermediates, when combined will contain all 4 focus points (as would 1+2+3+4). A+B.png is a focus stack of A (1+2).png and B (3+4).png. >> This result is what I expected initially when merging the 4 photos at one go. This means that the current alignment is not optimal, perhaps you could offer an alternate mode where Photo would proceed by using intermediate image states, as I did above. There are different ways to approach this, perhaps the same result could be obtained by first combining 1 and 2, then the resulting image to 3, and finally the latter combination to 4 to get the final output. Or alternately, use some kind of algorithm/AI to determine the closest set of images to merge sequentially before the final render. Is this logic legit? I tried, it's repeatable. Thanks. 1: 2: 3: 4: A (1+2): B (3+4): Source_Photos.zip
  5. Since the Focus Merge process must determine the Z order of the photos and which pixel to use from which image, that means that it is implicitly reconstructing depth information for each pixel anyway. It would be nice to have access to this data, either for further editing (such as enhancing perceived depth by applying color correction), or even to use it, say, as a displacement map in 3D-capable software to generate a textured 3D model from the image. I'd suggest a simple "Generate Depth Map" check box in the Focus Merge dialog box that would then lead to Focus Merge outputting a grayscale depth map as either a separate layer or a channel.
  6. Fokus Stacking does work in some cases, but here it fails dramatically: AP accepts just 2 frames out of 10 of the redcar-motive, while processing and result of the cars behind a hedge,11 frames, go really weird. Half of the sources are differently scaled like this, the result looks like this. A result in PS-CS6 leaves foggy areas but stays visually comparable.
  7. I'm in the process of evaluating Affinity Designer as a tool for combining multiple versions of the same photograph into a single deep image. I've been using this technique for several years using a combination of several applications, and I'm hoping AD may make the step of "squishing" all of these photos together a bit easier. As I am brand new to AD, I'm running into a problem working with multiple layers that I'm currently attributing to the ignorance associated with pilot error. :-) I'm working with 20mp images and lay down the first 5,472 x 3,648 TIFF image in the background layer. This image is basically full frame with no transparency. I then drop in the second image, which is also 5,472 x 3,648, but this image contains only those items which are in focus for that layer — so much of the TIFF is transparent, with the edges around the opaque objects feathered to be gradually blended into the background image. The net effect is to overlay objects in the background, with those in this second layer. (As a side note, this TIFF with transparency is created using Apple's Aperture and Lemke Software's GraphicConverter). However, when I drop the second image into Affinity Designer, the feathered edges that are supposed to blend into the background appear as very prominent gray lines when Opacity is set to 100% and the blending mode is set to Normal. This is different than what I see in other apps, so I'm sure I'm missing something when adding layers in AD. I've attached three image to illustrate what I'm seeing. The first shows a portion of a TIFF with transparency where the edges of the devil figure are feathered into the transparent background. The second shows how this same cropped image appears in AD, and the third is the result of laying this layer over the background, where what should be a completely undetectable transition is very obvious. Layer (in Preview).tiff Layer (in AD).tiff Combined Layers.tiff As I said, this works as I would expect in other apps, so I'm curious about what I'm doing wrong within Affinity Designer. Thanks!!
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