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Found 5 results

  1. Hi all This has been the week of figuring out how to get my colours sorted in Affinity Photo. There is no direct support for the ColorChecker Passport from X-Rite in Affinity Photo unfortunately but I did figure out how to do it with some help. If you use X-Right ColorChecker Passport these are the steps on how to do it. This might be painfully obvious to some people but for me it was all entirely new and took a while to get my head around so I hope that this is some use to people. 1. When you are shooting your photos in a location take a photo of the ColorChecker Passports colour cards and the white card. Make sure they are in the same place as your subject matter and are properly exposed. 2. Import all the photos from your session along with your pictures of the ColorChecker. 3. Open your photos of the ColorChecker in Affinity Photo crop them down if you like and export them as 16 bit Tiff files. 8 bit might work but I have been going with 16 4. Open ColorChecker Tiff photos with the new beta version of ColorChecker Passport Camera Calibration software in the ICC tab. 5. Export your ICC profiles naming them something so you know what photo shoot they go along with. 6. Close down Affinity Photo and then re-open it to refresh the ICC database 7. Open your photos from the associated photo shoot and go to the Document tab and select Assign ICC Profile and select the ICC file you just created. And if all goes well your colour is mostly corrected. 8. Now to set the white balances correctly. Go to White Balance in the Adjustment section. Click the Picker button and then click on the photo that you took during the photo shoot of your white card. This will then automatically make the adjustment. I hope that helps some folks. I did not understand any of this stuff three days ago and it was no fun trying to get my head around it for the first time. If anyone has tips on how to improve upon this workflow please share. I am by no means an expert on this subject. All the best!
  2. Hi, I'm facing an issue with Affinity Designer and Photo. Both of them showing a slightly blue hue to the images. Can someone help?. Just noticed today, never faced anything as such before. Thanks in advance, Krishnakumar
  3. This is the sort of question to which I feel I ought to know the answer but... My monitor is an LG E2551, which is colour-profiled using an X-rite ColorMunki Display, permanently connected via USB, obviously, which monitors ambient light as well as requiring/requesting me to re-profile the colour output of said monitor once per month, which I do. So, I think the colours seen on screen should be "correct"? Using both AD and AP on Windows 10 I'm very uncertain about which colour profile I should choose in Edit>Preferences>Colour. Should I select for the 16-bit and 32-bit Colour Profiles the latest one created for the monitor, or should I simply use the defaults, or even, one of the several available created for my Epson Stylus Photo P50 printer? I'm simply attempting to be able to produce print-outs from both AD and AP that are as "close as possible" in colour to what I see on screen. Yes, I do understand the screen is RGB and any print-out is CMYK and hence "exact" colour matching is impossible, but I would like to get the two to be as close as possible! Many thanks for any advice offered. Jeff
  4. When correcting or adjusting colours, for instance when you made a shot with a colour checker, it would be very helpful to separate a skin tone colour or any other colour in the passport or photo and line up that skin tone with the axis on the vector scope. Might even be helpful when not editing RAW.
  5. Hi - apologies if this answered elsewhere but I couldn't see it. I use the eyedropper tool to sample colours (usually 5*5 pixels) to check on skin tones, and convert these values to CMYK to compare to established skin tone colour values. Being red-green colour blind, this is vital for me! Is this a procedure within Affinity, or at least one that can be imitated? Howard
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