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Found 6 results

  1. Hi, this is a 12min video how I am blasting through the styling of a book in Affinity Publisher. I want to show you how easy it is to even edit mulit-hundred pages long books. I never thought it would be such a "blast" until I did it - as you can see in the video. My suggestion if you come from Indesign or if you start with just plain text. Set up your text styles first. Use the first chapter for it until you are happy - unless you already have a ready-made layout. Assign keyboard shortcuts where necessary. Set up your master pages, too. Don't apply them yet. Use a "running page" master page as your first page, because if you auto-add new pages (Shift-Option-Cmd Click), it will take the current master page as a template. Apply your special master pages for new chapters etc only after your text is formatted properly and flowing beautifully. Otherwise it will mess up your page layout. Apply sections last, too. So if you are afraid of throwing a 300-odd page book at Affinity Publisher, fear no more! If you do your homework (see above) first, the final formatting is a piece of cake. Cheers, Helmar [Note: This is a not a polished video. It's just to share my joy of editing in AFP compared to InDesign. ] Screen_Recording_2020-03-17_at_11_58_43.mov
  2. I've been corresponding with MagCloud/Blurb tech support, trying to pin down what they think might be the right Publisher settings for PDFs submitted to them. It's uncharted territory. They don't have experience yet with Affinity Publisher — they have InDesign and QXP templates but none for Publisher — and Serif hasn't commented much about Magcloud/Blurb that I know of. I did a lot of book pagination in the past, but it was always someone else who did the final prepress work. Blurb has a page that could be useful for people like me who don't have much experience with setting up documents for CMYK processes. The most rudimentary color-management info on the page, I already know. It was the soft-proofing bit that caught my eye. https://www.blurb.com/blog/color-management-printing/ The web page contains a link to the company's own ICC profile, useful for soft proofing. Scroll down to the What is a Color Profile? subhead, then look in the second paragraph below it for The Blurb ICC Profile is based on the GRACoL2009 reference (etc.). The link to the ICC profile is in that sentence.
  3. MagCloud, a division of Blurb, does not have templates for Affinity Publisher or instructions re: the desirable PDF export settings in Publisher. So for now there's some guesswork involved. The first .afpub made for the test had as its native color space CMYK, with the default CMYK profile selected. The second was an exact copy but with the native color space changed to RGB/16 and the garden-variety sRGB profile selected. Both PDFs passed MagCloud's preflight checks. In both cases I left the PDF export dialog's "convert images" check-box UN-checked. All of it will end up CMYK when MagCloud prints the books. But it will be interesting to see differences between the two. When I changed the native color space there was a noticeable change in contrast between white text on a black background. The characters' edges seemed to distinctly sharper in the RGB version. Could it have been only a screen artifact? Certain colors of the photographs had a bit of saturation boost in the RGB version as well — at least on-screen. I'd be interested to hear from people with a lot of pre-press experience: Given the differences in document color spaces and profiles used, would you expect significant differences in the printed pieces? (I won't be seeing them for a couple of weeks yet.) Something I didn't change in creating the documents: the Assign (versus Convert) setting found in Document Setup. This is one place where a "Lightroom style" UI does the user no favor: It's hard to tell which of those two buttons is "pushed" by default. For now I assume black means selected. The tool tips for these controls read "Assign color profile" and "Convert color profile." Does "Convert" apply to every possible object in the document, including photographs that were previously exported in RGB from their original raw format?
  4. This is to follow up earlier questions about using Affinity Publisher documents for books printed via MagCloud. Making the template hasn't been difficult. The unknown information (so far) has to do with the PDF settings. MagCloud has instructions for InDesign but none for Affinity Publisher. I see from other threads that there are people here with experience producing books on MagCloud. I would be much obliged for feedback about this if your time permits. The rest of the post concerns MagCloud's recommendations for InDesign's PDF export settings. The comment I'll add below it contains my guesses about PDF export from Publisher. Settings here are in order of their appearance in the MagCloud instructions. InDesign options for which there don't seem to be equivalents in Affinity Publisher are marked "**" below. (I'm using v. 1.8.2 for Windows.) Pages: All Spreads option: Disabled ** Created tagged PDF: Disabled [But so far PDFs I've exported from Publisher don't seem to be tagged] Export Layers: "Visible and Printable Layers" Hyperlinks: Include [optional] ** Include interactive elements: Disabled For both color and greyscale images: Bicubic downsampling to 300 ppi for images above 300 ppi Compression: JPEG Image quality: High [presumably meaning 80+] For monochrome images: ** Bicubic downsampling to 1200 ppi for images above 1800 ppi ** Compression: CCITT Group 4 The instructions draw particular attention to these next two options, which don't appear in the Publisher export dialog: ** Compress text and line art: Enabled ** Crop image data to frames: Enabled Compatibility: Acrobat 5 (PDF 1.4) Bleed: Include Color conversion: None Profile Inclusion Policy: "Include RGB and all tagged S..." [The screen shot does not display the full setting.] Fonts: Subset fonts when percentage of characters used is less than: 0% All security features appear to be disabled.
  5. My first goal in learning Affinity Publisher is to make a few small books of photographs—my own, and friends' photographs. After seeing a photographer's enthusiastic endorsements of a service called MagCloud (a division of Blurb) I decided to give that company a try. They have packages that enable you to make very short books at low cost—a good way to experiment. From what I've seen of the photographer's samples on the MagCloud site, they do a good job, including with black and white images. MagCloud doesn't offer a template in Publisher format, but creating probably wouldn't be difficult even for a newbie like me. My major point of confusion has to do with their color space requirements. My source images will be exported as 8- or 16-bit TIFF files from a raw converter (Capture One), likely converted to sRGB—I don't know if Adobe RGB would be overkill in this case. Friends' photographs will all be JPEGs—again, sRGB. MagCloud states that they expect RGB image files, but insist that all typography must be done "in CMYK color space" (their wording). I don't know why they insist on it. After all, they also say their process converts the entire PDF submitted to them to CMYK before they print the work. How to proceed here? If I start with a new Affinity Publisher document set to CMYK, what happens to RGB images placed within it? Does Publisher immediately convert them to CMYK? Or do they remain in the RGB color space? (I know already that Publisher has an option, when exporting to PDF, to convert to CMYK while still preserving the images' existing color spaces. Or would it be better to stick with RGB all the way through and simply blend colors using the CMYK sliders within Publisher*? MagCloud's own tech support people don't seem to be able to explain these things very well, so I haven't heard yet why they insist on CMYK for just the text within the source document. It might have to do with a need to specify something other than "hard" black for the typography. Apparently the four-color process doesn't like "hard" black. But the reasons for their requirement remain a bit murky. (They also say they don't support spot colors. This also makes me wonder what rendering intent I should choose, assuming Publisher has that option during exporting.) - - - - - - - * But surely setting color values that way isn't the same as converting a document to CMYK.
  6. Hi I have a V E R Y urgent issue: I have to create a doublesided --book(let)-style pdf (that means imposed) but I can't create from the printing menu. Obviusly this function should be located there, as bookprinting is featured as an option. However I cannot select virtual PDF printer. I tried installing 4 different "virtual" pdf printers I found at cnet.com, but it didn't help. Can you please help me with this!!
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