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Found 9 results

  1. I have an Epson ET-7700 ecotank printer on which I would like to print astro-photographs using Affinity Photo. So far results have been disappointing. The photos look dull and somewhat lack lustre and, although I appreciate they will not look as good as on screen, I feel they could be better. These photos are not for exhibition. They are just for pasting into my notebook or sticking up on the wall occasionally. This is not a question about how or where to get photos printed professionally. Does anyone have any advice? Some background info: All images are opened in Affinity Photo as tif 16 bit unsigned integer. I usually do a bit of resizing, changing DPI to 300 etc in Affinity and save as afphoto format. I am printing onto Epson Premium Glossy PhotoPaper which I can select within the printing menu. I have the drivers for this printer installed. They are updated. I use the printer for everyday printing, no problem. I have watched lots of YouTube videos on how to print in Affinity Photo including about ICC paper profiles, Soft Proofing blar blar blar but absolutely none of them have been any help whatsoever. Does anyone know: # Whether one should select ColorSync or Epson Color Control in the Color Matching menu? I’ve tried both without much effect. # Within the Color Sync menu there doesn’t seem to be a profile for the Epson Glossy Paper. Should there be? # If adding a soft proofing layer should one be able to select Epson glossy paper. The profile simply isn’t there in my case. I can boost the exposure a bit which helps. But I feel there should be a more systematic approach. Any thoughts/advice appreciated.
  2. I don't know if it's a question or feedback. For the past 5+ hours I've been trying to make sense of how to check how my work will look like when printed, and here's what I found. What I need I need a quick way to check whether my colors are within the printable gamut range and also to see the out-of-gamut colors. They keyword here is quick. What I get The Soft Proof layer works not like that. Suppose I am in the sRGB color space. It seems like it takes the RGB coordinates of current image of the sRGB space and simply applies them to the Proof Profile that I select (without conversion). But that's not what I want, this naturally gives the wrong results. What happens is that once I apply soft proof with the "U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2" profile I suddenly get a brighter image, as if it tells me that this is how it will be printed. And if I click the "Gamut Check" button most of image becomes grey. But it's not the case, it's not how it will be printed. In fact, all the original colors will be printed (in my particular case). The step that this Soft Proof feature misses is the conversion of Color Spaces for this "check". If instead of applying the Soft Proof layer I convert the color space (Document > Convert ICC Profile...) and select CMYK/8 + "U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2" then the image will remain exactly as is, it will not become brighter. Furthermore, if I now apply the Soft Proof layer and select "U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2" then the image will stay exactly the same, and if I click "Check Gamut" then no area will be grey. Because all colors are within the color space range. Bottom line It's very misleading what the Soft Proof shows if you don't convert your profile first. But if you have to convert your image profile to check the gamut then it makes the "Soft Proof" feature not helpful. I am attaching an image, just for reference, which I used to play around with this. Can you please help sort this out, why does it work like that and has that been done intentionally.
  3. I want to buy a Colorchecker passport soon, but understand that Affinity Photo has no support for that. So I wanted to test how it works when I create an ICC profile with X-rite's software, and assign this profile to a photo. I have downloaded a test file from the internet and generated an ICC profile. Only, when I want to print such a photo and use a Soft Proof adjustment layer, nothing happens. I'm pretty sure some colors are out of gamut. I tested that with GIMP, which does issue out of gamut warnings for the same image. But in Affinity Photo the image remains exactly the same with the Soft Proof adjustment layer on or off. Does anyone have an idea why this is so? Are not all ICC profiles compatible with Affinity? I wanted to attach the files I tested with in this post, but getting an error -200.
  4. I've been corresponding with MagCloud/Blurb tech support, trying to pin down what they think might be the right Publisher settings for PDFs submitted to them. It's uncharted territory. They don't have experience yet with Affinity Publisher — they have InDesign and QXP templates but none for Publisher — and Serif hasn't commented much about Magcloud/Blurb that I know of. I did a lot of book pagination in the past, but it was always someone else who did the final prepress work. Blurb has a page that could be useful for people like me who don't have much experience with setting up documents for CMYK processes. The most rudimentary color-management info on the page, I already know. It was the soft-proofing bit that caught my eye. https://www.blurb.com/blog/color-management-printing/ The web page contains a link to the company's own ICC profile, useful for soft proofing. Scroll down to the What is a Color Profile? subhead, then look in the second paragraph below it for The Blurb ICC Profile is based on the GRACoL2009 reference (etc.). The link to the ICC profile is in that sentence.
  5. I am trying to print an 8 page booklet of photos in Affinity Publisher. The colors lose some saturation when i print it out on Matte paper as i would expect. I am used to soft proofing in Lightroom, which has a lot of control for specific papers. Within Affinity, i believe soft proofing is only available in Affinity Photo, so i am trying to create a workflow to boost the saturation for the paper type, but ultimately print it out of Affinity Publisher. When I opened an image in AP, I applied the ICC profile for Inkpress Print Plus Matte two sided paper on the soft proof layer. The color shift was dramatic, it desaturated the colors. Relative and perceptual rendering did not change the color, but saturation rendering did and brought it much closer to the desired output. If i try other paper profiles, the color shift is more subtle and more like what i would expect using matte papers. A couple of question to help me figure out how to do this workflow: 1. The Affinity Photo tutorials do not follow soft proofing through to the printing module. Do you turn off the soft proof layer then use the other layers adjustments to print.? 2. Since the color shift is unusually dramatic on the one ICC profile, could it be a problem with how AP using this particular third party profile (although i have not seen this issue in Lightroom or inDesign for that matter)? 3. How do you set Saturation rendering to in the print workflow - this is a clear setting in Photoshop and Lightroom? I don't see the rendering option in the workflow. 4. I really need to print this out in Publisher, so how do you carry through the soft proofing adjustments back to Publisher to get the adjustments that would help recover some of the saturation lost on matte paper? I am quite frustrated by the lack of a clear tutorial or manual on managing a print workflow to a photo printer (such as a Surecolor P600 or Canon Pro 1000). This is further complicated but the different print interfaces between Publisher and Photo. Affinity Photo is much better, Publisher has a mysterious printer feature tab that doesn't make much sense (i have a related, unanswered post on this). Please point me in the right direction to anything that would educate me. I have looked through the Affinity Photo Tutorials, the Affinity Publisher Tutorials (both on the website, and the extra tutorials i have purchased). I also bought the Affinity Photo Workbook. I am either a slow learner or the information is not there.
  6. I printed an A4 montage as a Christmas present only to discover that it emerged from the printer as a disappointingly washed-out print. I know now this was mostly my fault as I had never set up Affinity for printing and it was using its default settings. I usually save my photos from Affinity and print from the Epson Easy Print programme. However as it was A4 I printed direct. I watched the videos about printing and soft proofing hoping I had found the solution. I didn't know what document profile to use so I chose Adobe RGB (1998) as that's what I used in Photoshop. I set the soft proofing to the printer paper I was going to use and ticked gamut check. I tweaked the curves (as shown in the video) until the grey splodges had disappeared. I increased the vibrance and HSL a little as too much brought some grey splodges back. I also found I needed to sharpen the photo more. The rendering intent was Absolute Colourimetric (None of them seemed to make any difference.) I did remember to turn off the soft proofing layer. In the print dialogue I chose the printer profile to match the printer paper but I didn't know what to put in the Profile option at the top so that was left as Custom. The photos I printed were certainly an improvement as far as colour intensity was concerned but were a bit darker and rather muddy. As you can tell I am well out of my comfort zone when dealing with setting up the printer and soft proofing (which is totally new to me) so if any experts out there could give me some pointers on printing from Affinity and soft proofing I would be very grateful (or point me to some info already available that I might have missed). TIA And a belated Happy New Year to all
  7. Hoping someone can shed some light on an apparent issue with Soft Proofing in Affinity Photo, but first a little background; I am looking to switch from Adobe products and Affinity Photo will be taking over the role Photoshop has played so far in my workflow, and so far so good. Then recently I was contacted by a client that wishes to purchase a print of one of my photos. This is the first time I am making a large size print for a client so I am doing this via a gallery print lab (I have done printing on my home printer before so I know the basics of Soft Proofing, however it’s a home printer Epson XP-235 so no ICC profiles for that consumer model). So I though this is the perfect time to test out the soft proofing in Affinity Photo. However I am getting very strange, and what I assume are incorrect results out of Affinity Photo. The colour space required by the lab is sRGB and a TIF file with a DPI of 300 which will be printed on Hahnemüehle Photo Rag and are soft proofing using the ICC profile for the given paper and printer at the gallery, so far so good or so I thought. What first got me thinking something was off was when I changed rendering intent, in Affinity Photo and there was little to no difference between any of the intents and huge amount of out of gamut colour. So I went back to Lightroom and sure enough in Lightroom there was far from the same amount of clipping using the same ICC profile and rending intent. Hence I opened the file in Photoshop and here results were the same as Lightroom’s rendering intents (relative and perceptual), while Absolute matches what I see in Affinity Photo. I would have assumed since I use the same file with the same colour space and the same ICC profile on the same computer the results should be the same, unless one software is interpreting colours and the ICC profile differently which in that case begs the question; which is closest to the truth? Or is this a bug in Affinity Photo’s soft proof adjustment layer? (And yes I know that soft proof will never match the true to life print, however I like to get an as close to the print rendition as possible, but I now have a very hard time trustingt what I am seeing in Affinity Photo). Pictures speak louder than words, so here is a chart detailing the results I am seeing and as you can see it's a huge difference. Hope someone can answer this or if I am missing something in the workflow. Software versions: Affinity Photo: 1.6.7 Photoshop: CC 19.1.5 Lightroom: 6.14 standalone Thanks.
  8. Hi everyone, I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the idea of soft proofing, or, rather, I feel like I'm missing some obscure nuance on it. I've read all of Affinity Photo's help files and watched all its videos AND spent hours bouncing around the web trying to come to grips with the subject. But here's the thing: as near as I can determine, soft proofing is always presented as something that you do after having processed the photo to what you want it to look like. So, by definition you're telling yourself, "all right! That's what I want my print to look like. Let's soft proof it... uuuhh, no, that's not it". Should this not be the other way around? That is, if your goal is to print a photo, shouldn't the very first adjustment layer be the soft proof adjustment layer, with the pertinent icc file and rendering intent chosen, and THEN you do all your other adjustments on top of that to get the photo how you want it to look? Also, let's say that you can do things in that order; when I'm done with all the other various adjustments, should i still deactivate the soft proof layer before sending the photo to the printer? I thank you all in advance for any light that you can shed on this subject. Happy post-processing to all!
  9. As described in the support request "Trouble with soft proofing", it would be great to be able to do proper soft proofing like in Adobe products (Photoshop / Lightroom). Among other things, an option to activate or deactivate the "paper and ink simulation" is currently missing, which is required for some icc profiles (i.e. from high-end photo print service providers). It would be really great not having to use Lightroom anymore for soft proofing! Thank you very much in advance!
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