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Found 12 results

  1. Ability to pass multiple images to Photo from the command line with the operation to perform For example: Affinity/Photo --hdr <img1> <img2> ... Affinity/Photo --focus <img1> <img2> ... Affinity/Photo --stack <img1> <img2> ... Affinity/Photo --panorama <img1> <img2> ...
  2. Fokus stacking of this cheap automatic clock
  3. Hi, I am working on an iMac running Big Sur version 11.3.1 with the Affinity Photo Desktop version 1.9.3 and am having a problem with Focus Merge. I ran a few different Focus Merges on RAW image files earlier today with no problems. Then I ran a focus merge of 35 raw images of 43MB each and this time I am getting a blur on the left side and bottom of the output composite. When I look at the source files (where the left side of the original image is in focus) the source images show a weird corruption of the left and bottom edges just where the composite is blurred. There is nothing wrong in the original RAW image files that I used to generate the Focus Merge so the problem is created during the Focus Merge process. I have tried this particular Focus Merge (quitting AF in between trials and selecting the same RAW images) now 3 different times with the same result. I will include 3 screen grabs to illustrate the issue: one of one of the original RAW images I used, opened in Affinity Photo to show that there is nothing wrong with the file - one of the output of the Focus Merge showing the composite with blurred edges - and the last revealing one of the source images with the strange corruption. I hope you can fix whatever bug caused this problem. Many thanks, Sandi PS - out of curiosity, once I had the Focus Merge output, I wanted to open one of the original image files in Affinity Photo in a second tab to see that that file was fine but once I did, clicking back on the tab where the Focus Merge output was, I lost access to the panel with the source images. I could not find out how to bring that window of the source images back.
  4. Hello, in the new version, the focus stacking does not work properly, indeed it does not work at all! I load the photos as usual, the software performs its calculations, and then returns what you can see in the screenshot: I don't have the final photo, and even one of the source photos is not working. The problem always exists, initially I tried with 8 photos and the software didn't work, I was thinking about a hardware issue so I tried with only 3 photos, but the result doesn't change! Please resolve as soon as possible! Thank you!
  5. Hello Forum, I am posting this because I searched on "Microscopy" "Entomology" and "Focus Stacking" and saw few if any results, I may be in a minority?...... Having spent many years perfecting Microscopy with Entomology and recently converting from a well know rival, I was impressed with the power of Focus stacking within Photo. These two images were taken with modest equipment and a Canon 50d digital SLR dating from 2008 and a Brunel MX1 Stereo Microscope with 1x Objective, 10x Oculars, Giving resolution power of 10x, plus magnification of the camera. Whilst I have DSLR's with much higher pixel resolution, it is often not required and extends processing time, the 15 mp sensor These two images comprise multiple shots (35 & 24) focus stacked within Affinity Photo. I won't bore you with the technical details, but if you want them you can message (I am happy to share) Affinity has saved me exporting my images to a third party software which has enhanced speed of operation and ease of use, one thing to note is that the Affinity software is not too picky on the order of focus slices presented, which is a major benefit to other rivals. Of course this technique could be useful to many area's of photography including, jewellery for record purposes, medical, veterinarian, instruction manuals and service documents where close up work results in very narrow depth of field. Enjoy your photography and enjoy using Photo. Regards Graham.
  6. New to Affinity Photo and wanted to explore the capabilities and caliber of Affinity Photo in comparison to that of Photoshop. I really enjoyed processing these images in Affinity Photo, and impressed with its speed and abilities. Image one is a stack of 27 images and the second one is from ~80 images. Images were acquired with a Sony A6000 camera with a 55-210mm lens by using a Raynox macro adapter. Thank you for visiting. Have a nice day!
  7. I’m attempting to focus merge on my iPad using affinity photo and the results leave allot to be desired. There is zero ability to modify before or after the photo is generated. There is no sources window!? Unless your program is flawless at outputting an amazing end result (it’s not, ive tried many) then we would need to be able to separately select and modify the photos through the source window, of which there isn’t one. In every image there’s a very clear halo that leaves the images sub par and not useable. so I guess my real question is is there a work around I’m not thinking of or understanding? Is the sources window called something else? Or is there some kind of toggle I’m missing? because honestly I’m shocked that such an important feature would be so half baked and incomplete on an otherwise great app. Having to pull out my old computer just to focus stack is frustrating and honestly ridiculous. I love this app, I use it exclusively now, this has been my first frustration but its a big one for me. Any solutions would be appreciated.
  8. This is the time of year that Amaryllis (aka Hippeastrum) bulbs burst into flower. This is the second flower from one bulb. The first has rather gone over and the third is not quite open. I photographed this full face using 13 images in a stack, focusing on the tip of the stigma and progressively down into the throat of the flower. I found that using the jpegs resulted in the white parts of the petals being rather blown out, so I used the original raw (awr) files. Using the merge, I cropped it, then duplicated it and made a selection of the flower itself and deleted it. I then inverted the selection and applied a Layer > New Live Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur with Preserve Alpha selected. Restoring the flower from the bottom layer gave the finished image. John
  9. My first test on focus stack. The speed of processing was impressive since the working space was set to prophoto-16 bit. It took only a few minutes to complete 25 images alignment and stacking. To compare, one single frame and the final stacked image are enclosed. Only minimal editing (curves and USM) is done on the stack. The output is very good. Soon I will be testing with 70 to 160 images taken with microscope objectives. Camera- Nikon D3100, Lens Tamron 90mm Macro, f18, 1/3 sec, ISO 200. This is the final stack. The image below is one of the 25 frames.
  10. Hi, Please compare the first two attached items, which are the final outputs of a focus stack. 1+2+3+4: VS :A+B (i.e. [1+2] + [3+4]) Here's what's going on: 1+2+3+4.png is a focus stacked image from 1.jpg, 2.jpg, 3.jpg, & 4.jpg >> The result is blurry, so I tried dividing the task to help the alignment algorithm. A (1+2).png is a focus stack using only photo 1 & 2, while B (3+4).png is one using 3 & 4. >> These 2 intermediates, when combined will contain all 4 focus points (as would 1+2+3+4). A+B.png is a focus stack of A (1+2).png and B (3+4).png. >> This result is what I expected initially when merging the 4 photos at one go. This means that the current alignment is not optimal, perhaps you could offer an alternate mode where Photo would proceed by using intermediate image states, as I did above. There are different ways to approach this, perhaps the same result could be obtained by first combining 1 and 2, then the resulting image to 3, and finally the latter combination to 4 to get the final output. Or alternately, use some kind of algorithm/AI to determine the closest set of images to merge sequentially before the final render. Is this logic legit? I tried, it's repeatable. Thanks. 1: 2: 3: 4: A (1+2): B (3+4): Source_Photos.zip
  11. Since the Focus Merge process must determine the Z order of the photos and which pixel to use from which image, that means that it is implicitly reconstructing depth information for each pixel anyway. It would be nice to have access to this data, either for further editing (such as enhancing perceived depth by applying color correction), or even to use it, say, as a displacement map in 3D-capable software to generate a textured 3D model from the image. I'd suggest a simple "Generate Depth Map" check box in the Focus Merge dialog box that would then lead to Focus Merge outputting a grayscale depth map as either a separate layer or a channel.
  12. I'm in the process of evaluating Affinity Designer as a tool for combining multiple versions of the same photograph into a single deep image. I've been using this technique for several years using a combination of several applications, and I'm hoping AD may make the step of "squishing" all of these photos together a bit easier. As I am brand new to AD, I'm running into a problem working with multiple layers that I'm currently attributing to the ignorance associated with pilot error. :-) I'm working with 20mp images and lay down the first 5,472 x 3,648 TIFF image in the background layer. This image is basically full frame with no transparency. I then drop in the second image, which is also 5,472 x 3,648, but this image contains only those items which are in focus for that layer — so much of the TIFF is transparent, with the edges around the opaque objects feathered to be gradually blended into the background image. The net effect is to overlay objects in the background, with those in this second layer. (As a side note, this TIFF with transparency is created using Apple's Aperture and Lemke Software's GraphicConverter). However, when I drop the second image into Affinity Designer, the feathered edges that are supposed to blend into the background appear as very prominent gray lines when Opacity is set to 100% and the blending mode is set to Normal. This is different than what I see in other apps, so I'm sure I'm missing something when adding layers in AD. I've attached three image to illustrate what I'm seeing. The first shows a portion of a TIFF with transparency where the edges of the devil figure are feathered into the transparent background. The second shows how this same cropped image appears in AD, and the third is the result of laying this layer over the background, where what should be a completely undetectable transition is very obvious. Layer (in Preview).tiff Layer (in AD).tiff Combined Layers.tiff As I said, this works as I would expect in other apps, so I'm curious about what I'm doing wrong within Affinity Designer. Thanks!!
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