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KipV

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Everything posted by KipV

  1. Is Publisher going up against newish tools like Sketch and Adobe XD? In many ways those tools are layout software so it seems like similar to what Publisher would do. I have spent far less time with Publisher then I have with the other Affinity tools so it's hard for me to know how much it competes with prototyping. What I have seen so far it looks like it is more of a competitor to ID and Quark.
  2. Not just books and magazines but any type of print layout. Whether the output is for print or screen makes little difference until you get to the coding stage which prototyping isn't about. The main reason InDesign doesn't have prototyping is that this area was too new to incorporate when that program was released. Had InDesign and Fireworks been made by the same company it is likely that we would have seen some kind of a combination early on. I think the reason XD and InDesign are seperate is because their initial releases are separated by decades. Had they been starting both products at version one today I doubt they would be separate.
  3. @Steps I am still pretty new to Sketch to do a direct comparison between the two apps but what appeals to me about Affinity is that it is a suite rather then just a one off program. I was aware of artboards I they have some limitations over pages if I remember right. I was using it for a layout program quite a bit in 2017 so was acutely aware of what it could and could not do (visual bleed marks in the program itself, for an example, was something it couldn't do.) Part of the appeal of having it in Publisher is that a designer could take their layouts they did in a book or other print piece and easily use those interface elements in their prototyping work. The thing about designer is that it is not a great layout tool (it's not supposed to be one after all.)
  4. It's also why I don't think it makes sense to push out Publisher as quickly as many people want it. I think the product has to be a bit more ambitious then a ID/Quark catch up tool.
  5. I was just thinking about another advantage of the having pro-typing with both Design and Publisher. Some people may start making a symbol in Designer and then have that symbol available in Publisher when it comes to making layouts. One product is good at assembling the pieces and one is good at layout them out. This may make a lot more sense then relying on a one product solution like Sketch. I am still not sure having one type of work focused on print and another on screen is enough reason to keep programs separate (ie InDesign, XD.)
  6. I keep getting this blank area at the top of the adjustment panel. It comes and goes as I open the app. (This thread has been re-posted as I just noticed it was in the wrong area before.)
  7. No, the differences are: - Each has an icon to easily and quickly see what it does. - They don't have to be hidden under a drop down menu. - They don't have to be partially hidden where you are forced to scroll down the list. - You can drag the panel out so it is visual all the time. Especially useful on larger screens. - You can see both the layers panel and adjustment panel at the same time rather than one covering the other up. - And like you said they have presets. Someone else can probably find even more differences.
  8. It doesn't take up any more space really, just makes the words a bit more compact. But then I don't usually work from a small screen if I can help it.
  9. The adjustment panel allows you to make large incremental changes before getting in the fine tuning which is nice when photos are often far off.
  10. Yes, I rarely undock the panel as well. Undocking wasn't the problem the last time this showed up.
  11. It's good to know you can now reproduce this. Surprising more people haven't reported from the first time @manu schwendener wrote about it. Didn't realize it was missing a few of the adjustment options.
  12. Another thing about the iPad is this is an area were Serif is easily beating Adobe. The latest desktop version of Photoshop has copied some of the Affinity features but they still don't have Photoshop and Illustrator on iPad. And even when they come out with that they probably won't be as far along.
  13. Because people want to draw with something that is like a paper drawing pad and the iPad is closer to that then a Mac. The first iPad and first iOS were not up to the task of running a serious drawing app and that is the reason they waited so long to bring Affinity to iPad. However as I understand it the feature set on iPad is very close to Mac/Windows with the gap only continuing to close in. What will not close in any time soon is the giant spec difference between computer and iPad. This is a serious category because even Adobe has announced bringing Photoshop over to the iPad. If anything could even say there will be more innovation happening on the iPad since the computer version of a lot of these desktop apps is pretty mature.
  14. Most of there experience hasn't been as a direct competitor to Adobe/Macromedia/Aldus. As I understand it they have been more of a consumer graphics company and are just now taking on the pro market for the first time ever. Again I don't know how they would build it (whatever their skill set) given the extreme technical limitations / high cost of an iPad Pro. A 6gb of ram Pro is close to the $2000 mark. Even if every Affinity user had the latest tablet the specs still wouldn't be enough to make the type of product some people seem to want to. I believe Adobe's app cross pollination has been more about trying to sell people software updates then the best long term strategy to take.
  15. Just realize that nobody has succeeded in doing what you are purposing with all the graphics companies that have been out there for decades. I am not counting on Serif having superpowers. They still need to work within the constrains of the current hardware, for an example many of the newest iPad Pros to hit the market only have 4 GB of ram that this super app is going to run on.
  16. Adobe has been trying to cram functionality of many apps for over a decade now to little success and I am very questionable that Serif is going to do it right. I love the fact that personas are not hidden under drop down menus especially when working from a large screen. Remember too that Affinity needs to work on smaller sized iPad screens now as well so the everything and the kitchen sink approach becomes impossible. Also iPads are very limited on resources compared to PCs/Macs.
  17. I would rather not have the icons hidden under a drop down if they can be easily displayed like they are now.
  18. I think Affinity's ability to pass a file back and forth between apps is adequate. I don't recall having any hardship with passing a file back and forth.
  19. I don't know how that could work. Their personas are subdivisions of the apps main function but if you rolled all the personas from all the apps into one it would probably take up most of a toolbar and I don't think that is the solution people are looking for. One of the great things about Affinity is that they don't have the bloat that Adobe is known for. I am very thankful for that.
  20. What would be really interesting is if they added the Designer symbol panel and docked that together with assets.
  21. Don't both operating systems have a "open in (app)" feature? I don't use Windows too much but it seemed like even old version of Windows had that.
  22. I keep getting this blank area at the top of the adjustment panel. It comes and goes as I open the app.
  23. In a lot of ways they are not that different. - Both are layout tools. - Both can have multiple page sizes (at least InDesign can.) - Have photo and drawing tools built in. - Rely on a third party plug-in system for to do the workflow. I would just wonder how an Affinity product like that would be different from the competition that is currently out there. Yeah, interesting point. Like I said in other threads just remaking InDesign / Quark / Sketch / XD doesn't make a lot of sense which one of the Serif guys agreed with and said that had plans to go beyond what those products could do (this was before Publisher was released.) The question I have for the people who say "make prototyping a separate app" is how exactly is this different from what we already have today? If they can't answer that question then it is hard to justify making the software. I think I can guess what he meant. At this point in time Designer has had several years to mature so they have been able to advance the product more in several areas including prototyping. I didn't take that as meaning that Serif would necessarily avoid adding prototyping to Publisher in the future.
  24. Or I wonder about having that persona in both Designer and Publisher? The weird thing about prototyping tools is that they occupy this middle ground between layout and drawing. Also worthy of pointing out Publisher will also be a drawing persona and does good and layout (which the other two products don't do all that well.) This is why it made more sense to me to work it into Publisher, but like I said putting it into both apps might be an answer as well.
  25. @MEB To me it seems like the most logical way to start a layout tool in 2019 (as opposed to 1999 or 1985 when prototyping tools were not really around yet) is to build prototyping in (along) with eBook support. Also modern computers have so much more resources these days that adding the additional functionality wouldn't be a problem it seems (as long as it is split into different personas so it doesn't become bloated.) I am sure if it makes sense for a company like the one which makes Sketch to only have one product instead of an entire suite of products working together.
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