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Buck Manhands

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  1. No worries. Assumptions are difficult. I am not offended. I too have 20 years in this game and I like having the overlap that adobe has in their products to make single-app designing the main workflow, but some things are better focused in an app that specializes in some things. Examples: - Making a poster in Photoshop or Illustrator is a nice overlap. Depending on the project I might open one or the other depending on needed graphics (raster heavy or vector heavy). Both have the text tools I need if there is just a tiny bit of text. - Using inDesign to make a pamphlet can be done in Illustrator too and might make sense if it is nearly all text with a couple of static graphics provided by the client. - It is nice to have some vector drawing tools in inDesign if a book is text heavy but just needs a couple quick vector illustrations. --- I like having the three different apps and choose the "main" app to design the project based on the need to open less apps and have less dependent files. I have a hard time seeing an app that could do all of what inDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop do in a single place. It could be overwhelming.
  2. Who are you to say how I prefer to work? Opening inDesign is painful and gets more painful every day. Nothing about it is a breeze. Their current version is so bug ridden and terrible I can't even... SMH When I design something with more than 4 leaves then I use inDesign, but if it has less, then artboards in Illustrator allow for a much more creative process that ends with a much higher quality output. I am fine with having three apps to do my work, it keeps the bloat of any one program to a minimum, but I am looking at how AD is marketed and it is for DESIGN much more than ILLUSTRATION and I hope that all the tools I need to do what they advertise it will do are there. Either they need to stop falsely advertising or provide the necessary tools. AD is already a swiss army knife if you believe their hype:
  3. I can see a need for a true page layout program to make books and stuff. AD will never be easily able to handle that, nor should it. Pagination is much more important there. But It is annoying to have to design a pamphlet or trifold with text that flows using a book/magazine layout program. IT is much better suited to AD and having threaded text boxes can make the design workflow much more accurate and enjoyable. I wouldn't worry about making the serif guys angry Petar. A few of them love to say things to make their users angry. I have never seen such behavior from staff in a forum before. They can be pretty surly.
  4. yep. total disappointment. Especially with their website touting things like this: Les revolutionary and more like devolving in so many basic ways.
  5. I don't want a book publishing program. I want a design program. Hopefully they make this part of AD and not make me purchase an entire extra program with less "design" abilities just to handle text layout and design on a poster or trifold.
  6. When creating a highly complex one-pager that uses lots of text boxes integrated with graphics a DESIGN program really requires threaded text. It takes a lot of extra work to go from box to box to be sure my text flows properly without threading. If AD was just for illustrations I would not see a need, but seriously this is a DESIGN program and text layout is a massive part of a DESIGNER's workflow. Save us from embarrassing mistakes that can lead to bins and bins of printed material wasted with this simple request. I would also prefer doing a small multi-page booklet or brochure in AD (especially if there is a lot of vector art and embedded raster images) rather than opening a full-blown book making program now that there are multiple artboards in a single document. Threaded text boxes make perfect sense for AD, it would allow for complete small document making in a single program.
  7. Buck Manhands

    Sneak peeks for 1.7

    I really hope that you will focus on things that are core features that entire industries can use. Things like the "save for web" panel in Illustrator and Photoshop is an essential tool all web designers need. Having the pop open dialogs for all my palettes is another awesome feature that will be hard to live without. The colors, shapes, layers, character, etc. palettes take up a lot of room when I am not using them in this program. Adobe may suck in so many ways now, but their pop open palette interface is excellent. I can have 20 palettes in what looks similar to my toolbar with small icons and clicking an icon pops open just the one I need just when I need it and leave my screen uncluttered when I am focusing on drawing. Having smart guides that outline each shape when I mouse over them is very useful, a lot nicer than holding down option while I click to drill down (though, that is nice too for other reasons). These are the things that will make this program shine, not fancy bloat.
  8. Buck Manhands

    Export preview

    I remember trying this program when it first came out and it had no preview function. I let you all know that due to my workflow that not having this was a deal breaker for me. I am so badly wanting out of Adobe's snare but I need to be able to preview what I am exporting or it just makes the whole workflow painful if you want to balance speed and quality for web based images. Until there is an export preview function I will not purchase your programs. I would use Photo and Designer as my main design programs if they had this feature. Nice job on some of the bells and whistles which I really don't have a huge need for though. Your program has come a long way from the beta days a few years back.
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