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littledetails

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  1. Has there been any progress on the non-destructive RAW editing / keeping RAW edits live? As my workflow increasingly involves blending multiple RAW files, the ability to tweak the RAW processing on each one as a smart object is something that really speeds up my workflow. This deficiency in Affinity Photo is pushing me back to using Photoshop for these cases.
  2. Affinity Photo includes an awesome "Blend Ranges" feature that I use to accomplish exposure blending with my photographs. It takes a little practice, but this tool is more flexible than Photoshop's "Blend If" sliders (because it supports customizable and non-linear luminosity feathering), and more efficient than Luminosity masks (smaller file size). I would love to see the efficiency of this feature further improved by the addition of presets within the blend ranges panel to create common blending curves, which would save me the trouble of frequently recreating similar curves over and over again. Presets such as "highlights only", "midtones only", "shadows only" or combinations of these would be a real time saver. It would also be great to see the histograms of the current layer, and composite histogram of the layers below, drawn behind the respective curve graphs in this panel. Without histograms it's hard to visualize how the luminosity information is distributed across the current layer and the layers below, and creating the blend curves becomes a bit more of a trial-and-error process to find the right spots in the X-axis to start or end your curve. Photoshop users have plugins like Raya Pro and Lumenzia that make exposure blending easier, although they suffer from poor UI and other issues. It would be great if Affinity Photo put some more effort into fleshing out the Blend Ranges feature for photographers who want to do manual exposure blending.
  3. As a landscape photographer I take a lot of exposure bracketed photographs. For a while I used to blend these exposures using HDR software, until I learned that there's a better way that produces a more natural-looking result and gives the photographer more control: manual exposure blending. Affinity Photo includes an awesome "Blend Ranges" feature that I use to accomplish this task. It takes a little practice, but this tool is more flexible than Photoshop's "Blend If" sliders (because it supports customizable and non-linear luminosity feathering), and more efficient than Luminosity masks (smaller file size). However, the process of actually setting up multiple exposures as layers ready to be blended in Affinity Photo is currently pretty manual and tedious. You have to open one or more of your files, and then drag the others in to create additional layers, or create a new stack and then cancel the stack to unstack the layers. I do this frequently enough that it's irritating that this isn't more efficient. Since switching to Affinity, I really miss the streamlined workflow from Adobe Lightroom, where I can select multiple images and choose "Open As Layers In Photoshop," which takes care of all of the setup for blending multiple exposures, with the added bonus of also not creating multiple intermediate PSD or TIFF files. Now, obviously Adobe has no incentive to support an "Open As Layers in Affinity Photo" option for Lightroom out of the box, but perhaps an enterprising developer could write such a plugin for Lightroom if only Affinity Photo would actually support the ability to open multiple files / data streams from a RAW processor as layers in a new file... In my dream workflow, it would be really neat if Affinity Photo integrated directly with Phase One's Capture One PRO, for a similar workflow to how Lightroom integrates with Photoshop. Perhaps Phase One would be receptive to such a collaboration... I suppose the gist of my feature request is that Affinity Photo is a fantastic program, but sorely lacking in some workflow/efficiency areas that matter quite a lot for people working with lots of images. Adobe, for all their faults, seem to have figured this out, and their ecosystem of products that work together is a great strength of their offering. In the absence of a similarly large suite of complementary apps, Affinity would do well to offer some basic hooks into Affinity Photo that developers can use to create a better round-trip experience when users are working with multiple apps in concert to catalogue and edit their photos.
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