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Orville

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  1. Like
    Orville reacted to Alfred in Jaguar E-Type Lightweight (AD)   
    That is absolutely astounding! Ten tons of work, you say? It looks more like a hundred tons!!
  2. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in Jaguar E-Type Lightweight (AD)   
    I've been working on this for a few months and is the most complicated drawing I've done so far. I had thought about doing it before but knew it would be a ton of work, in reality it was about 10 tons, seemed never ending.
     
    I decided to just do the front half to better show off the engine but I could re-use much of it if I ever wanted to do the whole car. As before it's just the pen tool, gradients, blurs and blend modes, so anyone could do it.
     
    Hope you like.
     
    As usual click to open, then click to display full size (although the actual output's a lot, lot larger).
     



     
     
     

  3. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in 1965 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Speciale (AD)   
    Thanks, quite pleased how it turned out. In case anyone's interested, the split view but with the vector textures hidden as they make it look a mess.

  4. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in Playing with polygons, Grant Wood American Gothic 1930   
    Thank you.  Just for you...
    Crucifixion of Saint Peter by Caravaggio c.1600.

  5. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in Playing with polygons, Grant Wood American Gothic 1930   
    It's nothing clever and the polygon fad might have passed but it was fun to do.  Most use a very low polygon count and just something like a face but I like to make it more complicated for myself, not necessarily better though. I had already done a version but wasn't happy with it so this is my new attempt.
     
    A tip is to duplicate the layer(s) and perhaps add a tiny bit of blur to the background copy. That fills in the minute gaps between the shapes and the output's much nicer.
     
    Click on it then click "full size" and it's not so blurry.
     

     

  6. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in 1965 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Speciale (AD)   
    “This is my Eiffel Tower. This is my Rachmaninoff's Third. My Pietà. It's completely elegant, it's bafflingly beautiful…” I think the last one I’ll do and post but it’s a goodie (well the subject is).
     
    The Ferrari Dino Berlinetta Speciale prototype was unveiled at the Paris motor show in 1965.  In my opinion the side view is its best angle, I can’t say that I think the front is particularly pretty. It recently sold for a ridiculous amount of money, over £3.2m/$4m.
     
    As I wanted it to be photorealistic what looks like a fairly simple drawing was plenty of work. There’s a lot of fine detail, like the vector textures I made up for the tyres and wheels, that isn’t necessarily obvious, especially at this reduced size, but if it wasn’t there then it loses some of its realism.  I'll probably go back to it in a week or two and see what bits I don't like.
     
    It’s also quite a large drawing, the full size output’s 88.5MP (11520x7680).


  7. Like
    Orville got a reaction from Puck in 1966 Batmobile (AD)   
    The original and best.
  8. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in 1966 Batmobile (AD)   
    I originally did this in Illustrator but it was missing something and needed more work so spent the last few days redoing it in AD although I did use the main underlying shapes, seemed pointless doing those again. It's a good improvement on the original. Being so long and thin it loses a lot of detail at low res even on the close up though.
     
     
     
     


  9. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in Creating Complex Radial Gradients, obvious tip of the day   
    Just a quick note about creating a radial gradient from a reference image. It will probably be obvious to most but just in case it isn't then it might be handy.
     
    Drawing a circle then trying to add the radial gradient points in the right place and picking up the colours isn't the easiest thing to do. You either do it on top of the reference or to the side, neither way is easy. It's much easier to draw a rectangular strip from the top to the centre (or from the left, right or bottom if you prefer) and create a linear gradient from the reference image.  This way you can easily see where the stops should be and pick up the colours.
     
    You can then save it as a style and apply it as a radial/oval gradient and do any minor adjustments as required. Here's a quick example with 37 stops which was easy to do this way even though it needs a tweak or two.
     
     
     
     


  10. Like
    Orville reacted to VectorVonDoom in The Image I’m Submitting For 1.6 Promo, VW Golf GTI 1.6 (AD)   
    I was going to do this drawing in Illustrator but read about Serif/Affinity wanting images for their 1.6 promo material so thought I’d give AD a try for the first time. This will be my submission and it so happens the GTI had a 1.6 engine early on. 
     
    Hopefully any Golf aficionado will recognise it as an imaginary custom series 1 Mk1 Golf GTI (1.6l 8v) in Miami blue. It’s been de-wipered, lowered, smoked lights, chrome bumpers, no arches and some really nice alloys you can’t see! I couldn’t decide on the colour, either Mars red or Miami blue. Obviously went with blue but the body just uses a single global colour so easy to change my mind later. 
     
    All in all it went fairly smoothly, if you know Illustrator you pretty much know AD. Some things I really liked, one thing I really didn’t (I’m looking at you layers palette).  Overall it was fun and good practice. Never used so many gaussian blurs before.
     
    As it's bank holiday weekend I've a little time to go back to it and tweak it if I decide I need to.


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