Jump to content

Renzatic

Members
  • Content count

    146
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Renzatic

  1. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    Eh, I prefer my terminology. Makes things more interesting. :P "Yeah, just hold down Alternate 1985/Cloverleaf Thingy + F to bring up that menu..." "...d'wuh?" "Yeah. You heard me."
  2. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    It might be worth your while to consider playing with the various options under the Interface and Input tabs, just to see what works most comfortably for you. To get the best Modo-like feel out of it, I'd suggest checking out your various options under View Manipulation, particularly auto-depth, zoom to mouse cursor, and rotate around selection. Under input, set the zoom style to dolly, with horizontal manipulation. YMMV, but I find this set up to the be the most comfortable. Also, consider turning on the pie menus. I have no idea why they're not active by default, but they make navigating through Blender so, so much more convenient.
  3. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    Want an easy solution to your navigation problems? Go to File/User Preferences, hit up the Input tab, and check the box next to "Emulate 3 Button Mouse". Navigation will now work EXACTLY as it does in Modo, with LMB plus a combination of Ctrl/Alt/Shift (or Ctrl/Option/Shift/Cloverleaf Thingy on a Mac) for panning, rotating, and zooming.
  4. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    Huh. So it is. Well, I'll keep calling it Fatty Lights, simply to save some face. :P Though sortakinda an aside, if you reall want to get into texturing, one thing I recommend you do is check out some Substance Designer tutorials. Even if you don't ever plan on buying the program itself, the videos could serve to show you how to make decent looking textures from scratch, since a lot of the nodes (minus some of the noise and pattern nodes, obviously) could be construed as individual steps in Designer/Photo.
  5. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    ​ I actually started modelling with an educational copy of Modo 401 (and okay, I'll admit I did some 5-finger internet discounting up to 601) back in the day before switching to Blender full time. I'd say the biggest hurdle I had to pass was teaching myself not to hammer the spacebar constantly. Once I got past that, and retrained my muscle memory to the new hotkeys, it really wasn't all that bad. If there is one thing I did miss, it's that Modo generally feels a little more streamlined, the interface a little better thought out. But considering the differences in price, that sacrificed bit of user friendliness is pretty easy to endure, all things considered. And Retrograde, if it's available on the Mac, I suggest using the Fatty Lights theme. It actually looks fairly similar to the new Light UI Affinity's now sporting.
  6. I've heard a few good things about Darktable over the last couple of years. Since it's free, it wouldn't hurt to give it a spin, see how it stacks up. edit: ...provided you're on Mac or Linux. Strangely enough, they don't provide a Windows rev.
  7. Renzatic

    Affinity Designer Workbook

    Not yet, but I have plans to get it. :D
  8. Sorry for resurrecting an old thread, but I'm considering buying an iPad again, and I've got a question concerning the up and coming release of AP/AD for it. I'm leaning towards the 9.7 inch, since I think it's an overall more comfortable machine to use. The only reason I haven't already committed is because I'm wondering if the Affinity suite is well suited to the smaller screen and smaller amount of RAM on the 9.7. If it's designed primarily/exclusively for the 12.9 Pro, I'll opt for it instead.
  9. Yeah, the emboss effect would be better for what you're going for, since it'd apply the highlight on the opposite edge. ...should've thought of that. :P
  10. That's easy enough to do. Select your three sand pits (assuming they're on their own layers), go to your effects tab, and apply an inner shadow. Set the angle around 45 degrees-ish to get it to match the shadowing in your example.
  11. Renzatic

    Affinity Designer Workbook

    Total aside, but I'm starting to lean in the opposite direction. I've gone almost exclusively ebook over the last 2-3 years, and, while convenient, I've come to feel that I miss the weight and heft of real books. Laying back at night and reading your tablet just doesn't have the same comfy, homey feel as doing the same with a book. ...unless you're reading a Stephen King novel. Those things are heavy enough to break a sternum.
  12. Renzatic

    Affinity Video Editor?

    Well, I have no problems with sunglasses, so I'm buying 5 pairs. ​ THE WORLD WILL SEE ME, AND COME TO KNOW MY DISDAIN! :wacko:
  13. Renzatic

    Affinity Video Editor?

    This. I found it rather shocking that it considered my 970 to be below spec for some of its higher end color grading features. Still, from my (admittedly very limited) experiences, it works fast enough, despite that warning. I think Serif is gearing the Affinity line more towards the graphics design crowd, rather than being a point for point competitor to the entire sweep of the Creative Suite. Hell, if they were, we'd probably be waiting a good 20 years for them to make good on their promise. Even Adobe didn't design all their apps from scratch all at once. It took a decade or so of banging away at their own code, and a few buyouts on the side to get things where they are today.
  14. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    I could see booleans being used for some of the more bubbly shades, but if I were to do it, I'd just bang out the basic shapes by clicking about with the pen tool, then adjust to taste once I have the basics banged out. Those bushes probably would be the hardest thing to do. I'm not sure what the calligraphic lines do in Illustrator (off to google I go), but I'd say the easiest way to achieve that effect in Designer would be to make a single U shaped object, give it a stroke, make the big circle that'll act as the body of your bush, then duplicate your little U shapes behind it, laid out so that the bottom halves are just behind the main body. It's a bit fiddly and tedious, but you'd get about the same results. edit: just watched calligraphic lines on YouTube. You can kinda do the same thing playing around with the pressure graph under the stroke tab, can't you?
  15. These types of threads always bring out the warm fuzzies, don't they?
  16. Keep in mind that there's already tons of closed source proprietary software on Linux now. Steam's on there with a couple thousand games on the platform already, and you can buy tons of 3D specific stuff like Maya, Modo, Mari, and even some other pieces of software that don't start with an M. The Substance suite also just released there recently too, after people begged for it for a couple of years on their forums. So the question isn't whether commercial software has a place on Linux, it's whether Serif can afford the cost to do the port, and if there's enough of an audience there for their particular software to justify the attempt.
  17. Renzatic

    Linux. Seriously now.

    That's probably because they're a company that addresses one of the biggest markets in the Linux sphere: programming. That and 3D applications are pretty much guaranteed to make money by selling to professional Linux users. Not to say that a good photo and vector app couldn't make headway on Linux, but it's kind of a chicken and egg problem. There isn't a big scene for photo editing and graphics design on Linux now because it lacks a good selection of programs. But the fact it lacks a good selection of photo editing and graphics design programs means that that scene resides elsewhere, and may not ever consider Linux.
  18. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    Cool. I've linked that site. Based on my experiences, I don't think it requires any particularly complex techniques in AD to pull off good trees and foliage, so much as a mind for shapes, and a lot, a lot, of patience. For example, take this shot I found... ...there's nothing in here I wouldn't know how to replicate in Designer after just a couple months of use. The technical aspect is pretty simple. It's the technique, the skill, and the time spent pulling it all off that's difficult. I might know how to do it, but not really how to do it well (not yet). It's like with my other trees, I could copy someone's style, but my attempts always ended up looking...er...goobly in comparison. But pines? They lend themselves well to vectors. I just have to guff around with some triangles for about 15 minutes to get something kinda cool looking. Also, I should add that I aped Frankentoon's crazy gopher fur style for that one tree. :P Oh, and another place to pull some good inspiration from is here. I think you might need a Pinterest account to view them all, but man, it's worth the effort if you don't have one already. There's tons, TONS, of awesome stuff in there.
  19. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    Why, thank you. :D If there's one thing I wish I did more with, it'd be those trees. Other than the fact that I HAD to throw in conifers, cuz Alfred is obviously a huge fan, and I didn't want to let him down, I wish I threw in some others for variety. Thing is, trees besides pines are difficult to do. Couldn't make one I was happy with. I had to roll with what I had for now, or else risk spending a month or more banging on this one scene until I was happy with it. Next up, I think I'm gonna try and make some characters. And get some more tree and plant practice in. Oh, and if anyone wants to check the source file, either to offer critiques for my techniques, or for newbies to see how I did what, here's a handy link to it.
  20. Renzatic

    Linux. Seriously now.

    That 2% might seem small, but you have to realize just how big the desktop market actually is. If 100% of the entire Linux enduser market were to buy the Affinity suite, that'd equate to a good few million licenses sold at least. Though you are right that Linux folks are a fickle bunch, and it's hard to tell exactly how well a proprietary piece of software will do in their scene. Me personally, I'd like to see them do a Linux release. I dabble in it occasionally, and I'd like to see it grow its software library to something a little more on par with Windows as far as choice is concerned. But at the same time, I can understand why they're reticent to do so. It's a difficult market to predict.
  21. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    It takes place just before the new Zelda with all the walking robot lazer spiders. So it's totally in theme.
  22. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    Took me long enough, but I finally finished it up. The rain dumping down outside gave me the perfect excuse to finally hop back to it. Didn't turn out quite the way I was planning, but I like the end results alright. It's good practice at the very least.
  23. Yup. Go to Preferences/Tools, and check the box next to "Select object when intersects with selection marquee".
  24. That's not really too much of a problem. The vast majority of developers choose either Red Hat or Ubuntu as the primary targets for their software, and leave everyone else to their own devices. Plus, with Flatpak/Snap distributables making inroads into the Linux scene, having to fret over whether a program will work as well on Distro B as it does Distro A might soon be a thing of a past.
  25. I'd say that's mostly due to MS never really trying to break into the pro publishing scene. Publisher was good enough for it's intended market, the home market/intraoffice crowd, and they felt no need to step things up beyond that. Serif, on the other hand, wants to court that pro scene, and has both InDesign and Quark to serve as a baseline goal. With that in mind, I imagine it won't be a lack of features that holds Affinity Publisher back at first, but the fact it's a new and untested player to a scene that relies on their time weathered, trusted old standards. Like Photo and Designer, it'll offer up enough on its first release to tempt a lot of people away from Photoshop, but the fact it'll likely be a little buggy when compared to the Adobe suite (which has been around since dinosaurs), and that it'll have to earn its reputation among the pro set will keep it from exploding right out the gate.
×