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Renzatic

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Everything posted by Renzatic

  1. Darktable is a solid piece of software. It can come surprisingly close to Lightroom in output quality, with a price that can't be beat. But GIMP? Maybe I'm being a little too hard on it. I dunno. I've heard it's improved by a goodly amount over its past few updates. But from my experiences with it, it remains the only piece of software that's actually managed to make me angry. I remember the trials and tribulations I had to go through just trying to save an image as a .jpg file. You don't just hit Ctrl-Shift-S, and save it as a .jpg file. Oh no. It can't be simple like it is in PS. You have to export it, otherwise it'll always save it as an .xcf file. That just made me so mad... Now I'm using Affinity Photo, which pretty much does the exact same thing. Sometimes life is just unbearably cruel. Oh, and props for having what's easily the most awesomest user avatar on the site.
  2. Here in the States, Dell sells a number of them. There's also a few other manufacturers that cater specifically to Linux crowds.
  3. Linux will never be a basic, no frills, immediately intuitive end user OS. Even though it's been streamlined considerably over the last few years, it still requires a goodly bit of know-how to work with it. It gives you nigh endless amounts of ways to customize things to your specific preferences, and can be incredibly slick when you bend it to your will and tastes, but that openness does come with a few caveats that will forever keep it from being what your grandma would want to use. ...that's what iOS is for. Which Serif currently covers better than anyone. See, I think of Linux as a potential option. I don't necessarily NEED it. I have a perfectly functional Windows 10 machine with Photo, Designer, and the Publisher beta installed on that runs just fine. But it's something I'd LIKE to have. I've used Linux enough to see its upsides as well as its downs, and with all things considered, the only reason why I'm not over there on a more permanent basis is because it lacks a vector and photo program I like. Yeah, there's Inkscape and GIMP, but the former is a little too simple and clunky, and the latter makes me want to punch someone every time I've tried it. I want a good suite of image editors (and Publisher too, since I'm thinking of replacing Word with it now that I've got to see what it can do). I've got access to pretty much everything else I need over there. Those image editors are all I lack. If I had them, I'd make the jump, and be perfectly happy with the decision. I'm probably not the only person who thinks this way. I'm sure there are a fair number of web designers that'd be interested in doing the same, since Linux comes with a number of IDEs and code editors integrated into the OS directly. Though I can't tell you exactly how big this linux-considering demographic is, it might be big enough for Serif to consider leveraging at some point in the not too distant future. ...maybe. Possibly. Can't say this for a fact, but it'd be interesting to see how it'd go were they to try.
  4. Which, you know, is Serif's primary market. I'm sure they love having some normal non-geek folks buying their spiffy affordable software, but their major demographic is web designers and photographers who are, for all intents and purposes, big ole geeks. If you were to draw up a Venn diagram between Affinity users, and Linux nerds, you'd see some overlap. I mean comeon, we're arguing about Linux on an internet messageboard. We're the geeks among geeks, probably only a hairs breadth away from breaking out into a verbal fist fight over Doctor Who. Search your feelings, Toltec. You will know it to be true.
  5. It depends on the business. Linux isn't an also-ran out there in the real world. If you're running a company with a complicated intranet structuring, heavy internet presence, or a need to crunch a lot of heavy data, they'll be using Linux somewhere. On top of that, the entire CG industry is practically built upon Linux. Pixar, Weta, et al. don't use Windows or Macs for their modelling software and render farms. They're all almost exclusively Linux. Hence why most CG-centric packages like Maya, Modo, Houdini, the Substance suite, ect. all have a 'nix rev. The one area where Linux is weakest just so happens to be the one area Serif is most focused: photography and graphic design. They're the one company that's come closest to competing with Adobe on this front, which is why we're seeing so much pressure here for them to release a Linux rev of their software. If they did, the platform would be fully catered to.
  6. That, and we don't really know Serif's internal structuring, nor the rough amount of effort required for them to port their software to Linux. The most anyone outside the business could do is try to convince them that there is an audience interested in their wares.
  7. The problem is that Microsoft has this weird tendency to do everything in extremes. One of the major reasons why malware was so prevalent in Windows post XP is because your average end users rarely, if ever update their machines, leaving them vulnerable to various exploits that have long since been patched out. MS recognized this, and thought "well okay, let's release a version of Windows that makes it so people have no choice BUT to get the updates." ...and hey, it worked. Windows 10 is fairly secure and solid these days. The issues arise due to being MS so freaking aggressive with these updates, providing you two big OS updates a year that can take anywhere from 30 minutes to gawwww amount of hours to install, alongside tons of smaller patches that sometimes necessitate a lengthy reboot in between them. You can't opt out of them. The most you can do is defer them, which requires a proactive stance on your part, and is only an option if you're using Win10Pro. If Windows has decided to start the upgrade process, you have no choice but to hop along for the ride. I'm fortunate in that I've never been caught unawares by it before. But I know people who have, and I can totally understand why it'd tick them off.
  8. Yeah, the thought of that's gotta sting a bit. Though it might be a bit selfish for me to say, it is at least somewhat reassuring knowing that we're not the only English speaking country going through some political craziness at the moment. If our little trade war keeps escalating, the end result will probably end up making Brexit look like a pancake breakfast in comparison. Australia's also going through some of its own weirdness too, I hear. What's up with the Anglosphere, yall? When we go totes cray? Why'd it happen all at once?
  9. You didn't know? I've already starting buying pallets of canned ravioli and bottled water in preparation for the apocalypse. This is the type of stuff you need to keep up to date on, man. You really don't want something like this sneaking up on you. If you don't, you're gonna end up like everyone else, out fighting in the streets over the last bag of beef jerky.
  10. It really depends on the machine, and the whims of fate really. Whenever I feel the urge to dip into Linux Land, I almost always go for Ubuntu or Antergos. They're both solid from my experiences, and have tons of support. On my computers I can get them up and running from first booting off the thumb drive to ready to use, proprietary drivers and all, within 20-30 minutes or so. ...but then I decide to do the same with some random computer, and the whole process is like beating my head against a wall. That 20 minutes becomes 3 hours minimum as I read through forum post after forum post after forum post of why version X of the Linux kernel that's used in distro Y doesn't like random piece of hardware Z, and then figuring out why the usual recommended fixes for this problem don't work with distro Y's setup, and have to search through forum post after forum post for a workaround. It'd be more fun pulling my teeth out of my head with a pair of rusty pliers. This is why I usually say that there are no small problems in Linux. Most people take that as me saying that it's easy to use, and always bug free. No. I'm saying that it either works perfectly, or your computer's on fire. There are no in-betweens. Guess you just happened to have the bad luck of landing on the bad side of that coin whenever you tried it.
  11. How long has it been since you've last fired it up? While I won't deny that there are still the rare occasional moments where you just want to reach through your monitor and backhand it, the whole Linux user experience has improved by leaps and bounds over the last few years.
  12. That's about what I did too. The moment I saw it Publisher was finally available, I rushed through to get to the download. Ended up stumbling on the tutorial link from the splash screen the 2nd time I loaded it up.
  13. And grabbed! Though unlike with Photo and Designer, which I had previous experience with using PS and (a tiny bit of) Illustrator, I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing here. I might watch some InDesign tutorials, and see if I can replicate what I learn here. It'd be a great way to beta test too, since I'll be stumbling through everything, and will likely end up doing something wrong over and over again. edit: just found the tutorials, which should also help out Mr. Sch├╝lke above.
  14. Okay, these are some of my first vectors, so please, be gentle with the criticisms. :P Besides making random shapes in Inkscape a couple years back, I've never dedicated much time to learning a vector program. It was always something I had a vague interest in, since I do have previous experience with Photoshop, and some 3D work, which makes for a solid foundation for it, but I've never taken that extra step. Well, after buying Affinity Photo in December and liking it quite a bit, I figured I'd go ahead and try out the Designer trial. 10 days, some tutorials, and a bit of goofing around later, I bought it too. So anyway, here's what I've done. Since I'm still shaky on my feet, I figured I'd try aping something simple before going whole hog. Thought Zelda 3 looked kinda cool back in the day. it's style isn't too complex, and it might vector well, so I gave it a try. This is about 4 days worth of work right here. First, I did the tree. I threw the original sprite in there for comparison. Next up, I did the pot free hand in a similar style. Then, I tried out the little witch's hut. I've actually managed to bring Designer to a crawl on this one. Gaussian blurs on top of gaussian blurs on top of drop and inner shadows on top of a bunch of other stuff...yeah, I'm probably not being too efficient here. It's still a WIP, but it's far enough along to show it off. Plus I went to town detailing that little cow skull, which is probably one of the reasons why the program is being bogged down. So there you have it. My first tutorial free foray into the world of vector art.
  15. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    And she's now finished! Got her placed side by side with the untextured original for contrast. I did the rest of my weird kids before this, but considering I've kind of improved over doing three previous, they don't look quite as good as Bethers here. Gonna have to touch them up before I show off the group shot. ...well, I was going to show the image by itself, but for some reason, likely to do with color profiles that are beyond my understanding, it's changing the skin tone to pink whenever I upload it. So until I find out why it's doing what it's doing, here's a screenshot grabbed directly off the desktop.
  16. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    Once again, it's been a minute since I last posted. Been practicing my texturing and panting work on and off for the last while. Haven't done much of anything worth showing off, but... ...I guess I'm finally starting to get decently decent at it. Decent enough to at least pop in and show off my rough work in progress
  17. Renzatic

    Getting Used To This Vector Thing

    It's been far too long...
  18. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo for iPad launched at Apple WWDC

    I have to give props to Serif. They do make some of the best promo and tutorial videos around.
  19. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo for iPad launched at Apple WWDC

    Hmm. Good point. Forgot all about using iTunes.
  20. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo for iPad launched at Apple WWDC

    I'm hoping it lasts at least two months, because it's gonna be a bit before I get my iPad.
  21. I'd be more worried about scratching my tablet. :P
  22. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo for iPad launched at Apple WWDC

    With this, alongside a new 10.5 inch iPad Pro, iOS 11 with an actual, honest to god file manager... ...anyone want to buy my Surface? Looks like I'll be going back to the iPad for my tablet needs.
  23. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    Yeah, your workflow will be different, even if the bare basics are the same. The one thing that took me the most time to get used to was how Blender makes a tool immediately active the moment you hit its hotkey. Like say you want to do an edge bevel. In Modo, you select your edge, hit B, then a little manipulator handle pops up that you can drag about to get the desired effect. Once you're done, you drop the tool with spacebar. It's much more up front in Blender. As soon as you hit Ctrl-B, the tool is ON. Any move you make with the mouse will start beveling that edge, which you commit by hitting the left mouse button when you're done. During those first few days with Blender, it felt absolutely spastic to me. I hated it. But I stuck with it, and now actually prefer it. It feels looser, but it's much quicker to execute once you get used to it.
  24. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    Blender will be easier for you to learn because of your previous 3D experience. At their core, both programs are fundamentally the same. You're edge sliding, subdividing, extruding, bridging, and moving around vectors on tris, quads, and ngons. The big hurdle isn't having to relearn everything from scratch, you already know the basic functions. The hurdle is figuring out how your new program performs them, which is a much lower jump to make. Just do what I did: start out whipping together low poly environments, and slowly your way up from there. And also cuss a lot.
  25. Renzatic

    Affinity Photo and Blender

    Hey, no problem. If you have any more questions, feel free to kick them my way. Oh, another nice thing to keep in mind is that if you don't know the hotkey for something (or a hotkey doesn't exist), you can search for the command and execute it just by hitting the spacebar, and typing what you're looking for. For example, if you want to perform a bridge, all you do is hit space, type "bri", and you'll see "Bridge Edge Loops" pop up in the menu. I found that to be one of the nicer things about Blender. edit: Oh, you'll probably be tempted to switch the select button from the right mouse to the left. I greatly suggest against this, since doing so breaks a few actions in Blender.
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