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Scungio

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  1. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Natalie K. in Can someone do a tutorial for creating a starry night sky from scratch?   
    I put together a quick video that can get you started but is by no means a comprehensive tutorial. I do go over using Add Noise and Levels.
     
     
  2. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Paul Mudditt in Request for Affinity Designer on Amazon Fire HD 10   
    Well, Serif is only developing for Mac, Windows and iOS at the moment so that excludes the Amazon Fire HD. Also, doesn't Amazon have a fork of Android, this Fire OS is an offshoot of Android, who is to say if Serif did develop the Affinity line for Android that it would run without any issues on Fire OS?
    There are those that want the Affinity apps on Linux, those that want Android, those that want it to run on Fire OS, I don't think Serif has enough time, money, people or resources to do all of that. I have the Mac/Win/iOS apps for both Designer and Photo and yes, this is purely selfish on my part, but I think Serif should concentrate on those 3 and not take on anymore platforms.
  3. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from IvanDoganov in Astute Graphics Technology   
    I have many of the Astute Plugins for Illustrator and it would really allow Serif to catch up and fill in glaring problems with Designer if they were able to license some of that tech. You look at the various forums and users pleading for offset path, better point reduction, improvements to the expand stroke, better more consistent booleans, users wanting something like the shape builder tool from Illustrator, the list goes on and on.
     
    Yes, Illustrator is some 30 years old but Designer doesn't need to go 30 years to catch up to some of their features. Please, please make this happen. I would gladly pay more for Designer if it had these missing features, especially if it was powered with some of this AG tech.
     
    Also, this is a smart move on Astute's part. There are so many vector apps popping up now, not just Affinity Designer, but other apps like Sketch, Gravit, Figma. I wonder too if their tech could be incorporated in some vector animation apps as well, like Harmony or Moho? Before they had just one revenue stream which was Adobe Illustrator users, but now, it could increase significantly.
  4. Thanks
    Scungio got a reaction from Love Adeola in Upgrade Pricing Policy   
    Yeah, I really don't get how people are on the fence when it comes to buying Affinity Photo and/or Designer. Or how they could possibly be against paying full price for the next version of each app.
     
    This is just my example of paying for Illustrator and the Photoshop/Lightroom plans. The Illustrator single app plan that I have costs me $21.19 a month. The Photoshop/Lightroom plan costs $10.69 a month. So, I pay $31.88 a month here in the USA, and that comes out to $382.56 a year.
     
    Over 10 years that would be $3,825.60. 
     
    Now, I took advantage of the introductory pricing that Serif offered on Designer, on Photo, on Photo for iPad, and as soon as Designer for iPad is available I will buy that too.
     
    I paid $40 for Designer, $40 for Photo and $20 for Photo [iPad]. Say Designer [iPad] has introductory pricing of $20 too. That is $120.
     
    Hypothetically say Serif has a new version for each of those apps once every 3 years and I upgrade to each app at the full price. I am looking at less than $450 for 10 years, compared to $3,825 for Adobe's apps over 10 years. And with Adobe I am probably never going to have an Illustrator that works on my iPad, never going to have a Photoshop that works on my iPad.
     
    I am one of those Adobe users that has had problems with the Creative Cloud. I have had 3 different occasions where I couldn't start any of the apps and had to deal with the pain of getting it all to work again. Sometimes that took days. I even had an issue one time where Creative Cloud was interfering with my Backblaze backup cloud service, actually erasing files. CC can be great when it works, but can be a frustrating, maddening experience when it doesn't.
     
    Anyway, back to the savings, $450 for Affinity, $3,800 for Adobe. If I can dump Adobe I pocket almost $3,400 over the course of 10 years. Even if I had to buy each Affinity app yearly, at full price, that still comes out to a savings of $2,200 over the course of 10 years compared to Adobe.
     
    So, when I see people on the 'fence', hemming and hawing over deciding to buy Photo, or Designer, or the iPad versions, I just shake my head in disbelief!!
  5. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Boomhauer in Why I am NOT supporting the Affinity range of software   
    As a longtime Mac user I had never used Serif's legacy apps because, well, they were for Windows. I think that you have to appreciate that over time, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with old legacy code, to add new features, to keep up with the changing Operating systems, etc.
    If Serif wanted to increase the number of customers by also including Mac OS, how were they going to do that easily by porting their old code? To take advantage of new hardware and technologies, modern APIs, etc, they had to literally start over from scratch with a new slate, and this allowed them to develop for both Windows and Mac and iOS. They have said they aren't developing for Android or Linux but if they were at least it would be possible now. This is not something that is unique to Serif, I have seen many software companies over the years having to eventually rewrite their apps at some point, it is just a fact of life.
    You may find yourself patting yourself on the back, proud that your old Serif apps work right now but there is no guarantee that they will continue to do so. I had bought many Adobe CS apps before they went to their CC cloud. On the Mac, on the latest MacOS, it becomes problematic trying to install older software. I keep an old Mac Pro with MacOS 10.7.5 so that I can run some of these older apps. You may find that Microsoft makes some OS changes in the future that suddenly make your Serif apps not run as smoothly. It is just the nature of the beast.
    I must say that buying software, and each user's different views on what they expect, what they think they are entitled to, what they think they deserve, has always been fascinating to me. I have the utmost respect for software developers, the coders, etc. It seems like such a thankless job though, with far too many people ready to dismiss your efforts. Everybody seemingly wants everything for free. I don't understand that logic and never will.
  6. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Boomhauer in Why I am NOT supporting the Affinity range of software   
    As a longtime Mac user I had never used Serif's legacy apps because, well, they were for Windows. I think that you have to appreciate that over time, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with old legacy code, to add new features, to keep up with the changing Operating systems, etc.
    If Serif wanted to increase the number of customers by also including Mac OS, how were they going to do that easily by porting their old code? To take advantage of new hardware and technologies, modern APIs, etc, they had to literally start over from scratch with a new slate, and this allowed them to develop for both Windows and Mac and iOS. They have said they aren't developing for Android or Linux but if they were at least it would be possible now. This is not something that is unique to Serif, I have seen many software companies over the years having to eventually rewrite their apps at some point, it is just a fact of life.
    You may find yourself patting yourself on the back, proud that your old Serif apps work right now but there is no guarantee that they will continue to do so. I had bought many Adobe CS apps before they went to their CC cloud. On the Mac, on the latest MacOS, it becomes problematic trying to install older software. I keep an old Mac Pro with MacOS 10.7.5 so that I can run some of these older apps. You may find that Microsoft makes some OS changes in the future that suddenly make your Serif apps not run as smoothly. It is just the nature of the beast.
    I must say that buying software, and each user's different views on what they expect, what they think they are entitled to, what they think they deserve, has always been fascinating to me. I have the utmost respect for software developers, the coders, etc. It seems like such a thankless job though, with far too many people ready to dismiss your efforts. Everybody seemingly wants everything for free. I don't understand that logic and never will.
  7. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Boomhauer in Why I am NOT supporting the Affinity range of software   
    As a longtime Mac user I had never used Serif's legacy apps because, well, they were for Windows. I think that you have to appreciate that over time, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with old legacy code, to add new features, to keep up with the changing Operating systems, etc.
    If Serif wanted to increase the number of customers by also including Mac OS, how were they going to do that easily by porting their old code? To take advantage of new hardware and technologies, modern APIs, etc, they had to literally start over from scratch with a new slate, and this allowed them to develop for both Windows and Mac and iOS. They have said they aren't developing for Android or Linux but if they were at least it would be possible now. This is not something that is unique to Serif, I have seen many software companies over the years having to eventually rewrite their apps at some point, it is just a fact of life.
    You may find yourself patting yourself on the back, proud that your old Serif apps work right now but there is no guarantee that they will continue to do so. I had bought many Adobe CS apps before they went to their CC cloud. On the Mac, on the latest MacOS, it becomes problematic trying to install older software. I keep an old Mac Pro with MacOS 10.7.5 so that I can run some of these older apps. You may find that Microsoft makes some OS changes in the future that suddenly make your Serif apps not run as smoothly. It is just the nature of the beast.
    I must say that buying software, and each user's different views on what they expect, what they think they are entitled to, what they think they deserve, has always been fascinating to me. I have the utmost respect for software developers, the coders, etc. It seems like such a thankless job though, with far too many people ready to dismiss your efforts. Everybody seemingly wants everything for free. I don't understand that logic and never will.
  8. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Boomhauer in Why I am NOT supporting the Affinity range of software   
    As a longtime Mac user I had never used Serif's legacy apps because, well, they were for Windows. I think that you have to appreciate that over time, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with old legacy code, to add new features, to keep up with the changing Operating systems, etc.
    If Serif wanted to increase the number of customers by also including Mac OS, how were they going to do that easily by porting their old code? To take advantage of new hardware and technologies, modern APIs, etc, they had to literally start over from scratch with a new slate, and this allowed them to develop for both Windows and Mac and iOS. They have said they aren't developing for Android or Linux but if they were at least it would be possible now. This is not something that is unique to Serif, I have seen many software companies over the years having to eventually rewrite their apps at some point, it is just a fact of life.
    You may find yourself patting yourself on the back, proud that your old Serif apps work right now but there is no guarantee that they will continue to do so. I had bought many Adobe CS apps before they went to their CC cloud. On the Mac, on the latest MacOS, it becomes problematic trying to install older software. I keep an old Mac Pro with MacOS 10.7.5 so that I can run some of these older apps. You may find that Microsoft makes some OS changes in the future that suddenly make your Serif apps not run as smoothly. It is just the nature of the beast.
    I must say that buying software, and each user's different views on what they expect, what they think they are entitled to, what they think they deserve, has always been fascinating to me. I have the utmost respect for software developers, the coders, etc. It seems like such a thankless job though, with far too many people ready to dismiss your efforts. Everybody seemingly wants everything for free. I don't understand that logic and never will.
  9. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Boomhauer in Why I am NOT supporting the Affinity range of software   
    As a longtime Mac user I had never used Serif's legacy apps because, well, they were for Windows. I think that you have to appreciate that over time, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with old legacy code, to add new features, to keep up with the changing Operating systems, etc.
    If Serif wanted to increase the number of customers by also including Mac OS, how were they going to do that easily by porting their old code? To take advantage of new hardware and technologies, modern APIs, etc, they had to literally start over from scratch with a new slate, and this allowed them to develop for both Windows and Mac and iOS. They have said they aren't developing for Android or Linux but if they were at least it would be possible now. This is not something that is unique to Serif, I have seen many software companies over the years having to eventually rewrite their apps at some point, it is just a fact of life.
    You may find yourself patting yourself on the back, proud that your old Serif apps work right now but there is no guarantee that they will continue to do so. I had bought many Adobe CS apps before they went to their CC cloud. On the Mac, on the latest MacOS, it becomes problematic trying to install older software. I keep an old Mac Pro with MacOS 10.7.5 so that I can run some of these older apps. You may find that Microsoft makes some OS changes in the future that suddenly make your Serif apps not run as smoothly. It is just the nature of the beast.
    I must say that buying software, and each user's different views on what they expect, what they think they are entitled to, what they think they deserve, has always been fascinating to me. I have the utmost respect for software developers, the coders, etc. It seems like such a thankless job though, with far too many people ready to dismiss your efforts. Everybody seemingly wants everything for free. I don't understand that logic and never will.
  10. Thanks
    Scungio got a reaction from Cattereia in Celtic knots and other intricate shapes ?   
    Yeah, as I explained briefly sometimes you have to manually go in and move some nodes around to make one shape overlap the other just enough to make the add/join operation work.
     
    Better to explain in a video, so here is a 3 minute clip:
     
     
  11. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Ghaeth wardeh in Recommended PC Hardware for affinity photo and affinity designer!   
    No, I agree with you about the inherent advantages of a desktop, but for many younger people their phone is their computer. They spend more time consuming media, surfing the internet and their phones are in a lot of cases their only camera, the only thing they have to shoot video, etc. I know many that when they are faced with moving on to something with a little more oomph, or complementing their phone, they are looking at the iPad.
    For what now, $299 (at Best Buy, in the US) for the latest 9.7 inch Apple iPad. You go to Apple's refurbished section on their website and you can pick up an Apple Pencil for $85. OWC or elsewhere you can pick up that smaller Apple Bluetooth keyboard for $35 or less. Throw in $40 for Affinity Designer and Photo. Procreate is $10. LumaFusion is $20, Ferrite Recording Studio is $20, Stratospherix FileBrowser is $6, Yoink is $3. $99 for the software, and with that you get an image editor, a vector drawing app, a painting app, a video editor, a sound editor, and a file system that makes things more manageable. And that $99 can sometimes be negotiable as those companies have sales from time to time. If you were to buy a laptop or desktop and got comparable software wouldn't it be significantly more than $99?
    That comes out to $518 in all for the hardware and software. Yeah, throw in a case and the assorted odd and end and you are maybe up to $600. For many people I know, younger people I know, the iPad is more compelling. There are even a lot of older people that I have seen the past couple years that are ditching their laptops because they can do everything they want with 'just' an iPad. My mom being one of them.
    I know there are many on this forum that question Serif's decision to make an iPad version of Photo and Designer, but to me it is brilliant. This can be a nice revenue stream for them because the competition is rather meager and there are so many users looking for quality, high end software on iOS.
  12. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Alfred in Recommended PC Hardware for affinity photo and affinity designer!   
    Yeah, it is tricky going by reviews. For example, hey, we all love Affinity Photo for iPad, but those that are using it on an iPad Air 2 or last year's iPad without an Apple Pencil? Brutal. I have tried using other bluetooth digital stylus from Adonit to Wacom, etc and they just can't compare to the Apple Pencil. So, yeah, I can read reviews of software on the app store and I have to take it with a grain of salt sometimes because I do no know that person's use case. Do they have a lower spec iPad? Are they trying to use an app that can barely run on their hardware? Do they have their iPad filled to the brim with junk? I know so many people that will literally use up nearly all of their available storage and then wonder why things are so slow or why apps don't work right, etc.
    I know many people that will trash an app because they just can't figure it out right away, or that it should come easily. I will admit that from time to time I am guilty of this too, being frustrated that I can't figure things out quickly, not trashing the app though. 
    Anyway, just a lot of factors go into my buying an app, the reviews are really a small part of it at the end of the day. For example, in choosing Ferrite Recording Studio, I read many bad reviews from people that are used to perhaps old ways of doing things. The idea of using a touch based input device and the Apple Pencil in editing just really chaffed some people the wrong way and they ended up with a negative review. Me? I like that it was different, the whole experience of the iPad for me is hoping app developers think outside the box and work to the strengths of the device, of the OS.
    I see Apple just moving forward with the iPad, making it better and better. And I think actually the success of the A-series chips and the power of the iPad convinced Apple to decide to move from Intel chips and develop their own desktop chips for laptops and desktops.
  13. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Alfred in Recommended PC Hardware for affinity photo and affinity designer!   
    I do agree that the 12.9 inch iPad Pro is the way to go if you do indeed want to go that route. I had the first gen 9.7 inch iPad Pro and the screen was just too small for me, it made such a big difference when I upgraded.
    I usually keep my iPad for 18 months to 2 years and then sell it to Gazelle or Usell and then take that money and put it towards the new iPad, to subsidize it if you will. That is the crazy thing about Apple hardware the resell value is incredible as long as you take good care of it. That first iPad that I bought way back when, the first model, I paid full price for that, but the 3 iPads that I have gotten since have been way less. My current 12.9 iPad Pro I bought for $700 on Ebay through a respected seller and I got $225 from Gazelle for my old 9.7 inch iPad Pro, so $700-$225 = $475. That is how I do it every couple years, sell the old one and use it to buy the new one.
    I have always loved the iPad from day one. The portability, the versatility to be used in a number of ways. There simply is no better way for me to read my comic books than on my 12.9 inch iPad Pro. Or to read books. And now the software is finally coming. Affinity Photo, soon Affinity Designer, Procreate, Clip Studio Paint. Want to do Video Editing, Lumatouch's LumaFusion is pretty awesome. Sound Editing? Wooji Juice's Ferrite Recording Studio is sweet. Want to do some ZBrush type of work on the go? Try Forger.
    I think many of the complaints of a file system or issues with workflow are sort of moot if you know what apps to get/use. Stratospherix File Browser and/or Readdle's Documents along with a nifty clipboard app like Yoink are a pretty good solution. I don't really use Apple's Files app. 
    I do think that the younger generation CAN use the iPad Pro as a replacement for a PC. Us old farts want to hang on to our desktops probably because it is so deeply ingrained.
    Anyway, I always recommend people don't waste their time getting the Cellular iPad Pro models, why pay more for that? When I am not in range of wifi when I am out and about, I just use my phone as a hotspot for the iPad Pro to connect to, works fine, just didn't see the need to pay for another plan for my iPad. Also, yeah, more storage is nice but 64 GB is very doable if you are smart with how you work, Stratosherix File Browser allows me to access hard drives on my Mac Pro and Ryzen PC, as well as a NAS, and my various cloud services, Dropbox, iCloud, Google Drive, etc.
    In terms of a keyboard, it really isn't that necessary to buy the smart keyboard. I have a Logitech, an Anker mini Bluetooth keyboard and an older Apple Bluetooth keyboard (that was used previously with an iMac) that all work with my iPad Pro. 
  14. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Alfred in Recommended PC Hardware for affinity photo and affinity designer!   
    Yeah, it is tricky going by reviews. For example, hey, we all love Affinity Photo for iPad, but those that are using it on an iPad Air 2 or last year's iPad without an Apple Pencil? Brutal. I have tried using other bluetooth digital stylus from Adonit to Wacom, etc and they just can't compare to the Apple Pencil. So, yeah, I can read reviews of software on the app store and I have to take it with a grain of salt sometimes because I do no know that person's use case. Do they have a lower spec iPad? Are they trying to use an app that can barely run on their hardware? Do they have their iPad filled to the brim with junk? I know so many people that will literally use up nearly all of their available storage and then wonder why things are so slow or why apps don't work right, etc.
    I know many people that will trash an app because they just can't figure it out right away, or that it should come easily. I will admit that from time to time I am guilty of this too, being frustrated that I can't figure things out quickly, not trashing the app though. 
    Anyway, just a lot of factors go into my buying an app, the reviews are really a small part of it at the end of the day. For example, in choosing Ferrite Recording Studio, I read many bad reviews from people that are used to perhaps old ways of doing things. The idea of using a touch based input device and the Apple Pencil in editing just really chaffed some people the wrong way and they ended up with a negative review. Me? I like that it was different, the whole experience of the iPad for me is hoping app developers think outside the box and work to the strengths of the device, of the OS.
    I see Apple just moving forward with the iPad, making it better and better. And I think actually the success of the A-series chips and the power of the iPad convinced Apple to decide to move from Intel chips and develop their own desktop chips for laptops and desktops.
  15. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Alfred in Recommended PC Hardware for affinity photo and affinity designer!   
    I do agree that the 12.9 inch iPad Pro is the way to go if you do indeed want to go that route. I had the first gen 9.7 inch iPad Pro and the screen was just too small for me, it made such a big difference when I upgraded.
    I usually keep my iPad for 18 months to 2 years and then sell it to Gazelle or Usell and then take that money and put it towards the new iPad, to subsidize it if you will. That is the crazy thing about Apple hardware the resell value is incredible as long as you take good care of it. That first iPad that I bought way back when, the first model, I paid full price for that, but the 3 iPads that I have gotten since have been way less. My current 12.9 iPad Pro I bought for $700 on Ebay through a respected seller and I got $225 from Gazelle for my old 9.7 inch iPad Pro, so $700-$225 = $475. That is how I do it every couple years, sell the old one and use it to buy the new one.
    I have always loved the iPad from day one. The portability, the versatility to be used in a number of ways. There simply is no better way for me to read my comic books than on my 12.9 inch iPad Pro. Or to read books. And now the software is finally coming. Affinity Photo, soon Affinity Designer, Procreate, Clip Studio Paint. Want to do Video Editing, Lumatouch's LumaFusion is pretty awesome. Sound Editing? Wooji Juice's Ferrite Recording Studio is sweet. Want to do some ZBrush type of work on the go? Try Forger.
    I think many of the complaints of a file system or issues with workflow are sort of moot if you know what apps to get/use. Stratospherix File Browser and/or Readdle's Documents along with a nifty clipboard app like Yoink are a pretty good solution. I don't really use Apple's Files app. 
    I do think that the younger generation CAN use the iPad Pro as a replacement for a PC. Us old farts want to hang on to our desktops probably because it is so deeply ingrained.
    Anyway, I always recommend people don't waste their time getting the Cellular iPad Pro models, why pay more for that? When I am not in range of wifi when I am out and about, I just use my phone as a hotspot for the iPad Pro to connect to, works fine, just didn't see the need to pay for another plan for my iPad. Also, yeah, more storage is nice but 64 GB is very doable if you are smart with how you work, Stratosherix File Browser allows me to access hard drives on my Mac Pro and Ryzen PC, as well as a NAS, and my various cloud services, Dropbox, iCloud, Google Drive, etc.
    In terms of a keyboard, it really isn't that necessary to buy the smart keyboard. I have a Logitech, an Anker mini Bluetooth keyboard and an older Apple Bluetooth keyboard (that was used previously with an iMac) that all work with my iPad Pro. 
  16. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from RemN in Isometric Illustration, work in progress...   
    Howdy, 
     
    Decided to try my hand at doing an isometric illustration and hope to make it interactive. Plan to use Tumult's Hype to add interactivity, to be able to isolate rooms, make obstructing walls vanish. Very early days but thought maybe some might find it interesting.
     

  17. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Dylan SJ Perez in "Subtract" compound is leaving an artefact on one element   
    You could select the 3 points of the triangle and use the Corner Tool with the straight option:
     

  18. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Dylan SJ Perez in "Subtract" compound is leaving an artefact on one element   
    You could select the 3 points of the triangle and use the Corner Tool with the straight option:
     

  19. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Dylan SJ Perez in How can I make these 3 circles all the same distance from these triangle points?   
    One of the things I do miss from using Illustrator was the free Astute Graphics SubScribe plugin. I have been trying to find workarounds for various situations like the one you have here. A quick video showing how I deal with an example like this:
     
    Just another way of getting to the end result.
  20. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from Dylan SJ Perez in How can I make these 3 circles all the same distance from these triangle points?   
    One of the things I do miss from using Illustrator was the free Astute Graphics SubScribe plugin. I have been trying to find workarounds for various situations like the one you have here. A quick video showing how I deal with an example like this:
     
    Just another way of getting to the end result.
  21. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from GabrielM in Why does dodge brush tonal range work out of range?   
    I have replicated your scenario and it works fine for me. It is the low opacity setting that makes it hard to discern any difference.
     
    Do this, use the Dodge tool on your 50% gray circle, swipe the top of the circle with the Dodge tool set to Highlights, swipe the middle of the circle with the Dodge tool set to Midtones and then the bottom of the circle with Shadows. Then open the Info panel, set 3 samplers for each area that you swiped and check out the numbers. Here is an example:
     

     
    As you can see the numbers are subtle but there is a difference between each. The Gray circle was 128, 128, 128 for the RGB. If you increase that low 20 opacity setting for the dodge tool to something like 40% you will see the number for each sampler increase, become more noticeable.
  22. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from firstdefence in How to make corners more rounded?   
    Yeah, it would be easier to just replace that square with the round corners with a regular square and then you can use the corner tool to select all 4 points and then round them how you want. Wait, let me finish this leftover chinese food (my favorite breakfast) and I will throw together a video.
     
    (5 minutes later)
     
     
    Been itching to try out my Screenflow 7 upgrade anyway,
     
    -Mark
  23. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from mykee in Real Perspetive Mockup with AD   
    This to me is one of the coolest things about the Affinity Apps. In Designer I can set up Artboards and then open them up in Photo. Say I want to do a bunch of backgrounds for an animation, I can set up say 3 or 4 artboards and then use the vector tools in Designer to block out quick shapes/forms. I can go into the Pixel Persona and then use bitmap tools to build them up more. At some point, yeah, you would like to have some of the Live Filters that are in Photo. You could save the file and then open Photo and continue working with all of the tools that it provides. 
     
    But just as Photo can read and work with the Artboards that Designer creates, so can Designer read and work with the Live Filters made with Photo. So, I have taken my favorite Live Filters from Photo and put them in a blank document. In the Layers panels you just see nothing but the Live Filters. In Designer I open this file and then am able to just copy the Live Halftone Filter for example and paste it into the current document that I happen to be working on. This to me is the fastest most convenient way, but you can actually copy a Live Filter from the Layers Panel in Photo, then go to Designer and paste.
     
    I love being able to see just how far I can take something bitmap-wise, within Designer, before having to finish it off in Photo.
     
    Here is a quick example of what I am talking about. Here are two vector Cogs shapes with three Affinity Photo Live Filters applied within Designer by copying and pasting from my Live Filters cheat sheet.
     

     
    I don't really find anything haphazard, or dangerous using the two apps in this manner. I am quite amazed that it works so well. If you aren't playing with this flexibility, aren't exploring, well, you don't know what you are missing!
  24. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from emmrecs01 in Moving from Mac to Windows   
    Just stumbled on this topic, interesting to hear other users thoughts, or potential users thoughts anyway.
     
    Me? I was an early adopter of the Affinity apps, I have Designer for Mac, Photo for Mac, and Photo for iPad. When Designer for iPad is available I will quickly buy that. So I am a Mac guy but just last month I bought a Ryzen 7 PC and wanted to install the Affinity apps on it.
     
    Did not even blink when it came to buying the Windows versions from Serif's store. Serif has separate development teams for both platforms, yes? Seems to me that I would have to be a pretty cheap bastard (pardon my language) to expect Serif to just give me Mac and Windows installers for the low price of $50. That is lunacy. Serif has to pay their bills, their employees, etc. I feel guilty enough as is buying Serif's software because I think they should be charging more for their products.
     
    I canceled my Photoshop/Lightroom and Illustrator plans that I had the past 4 years. Over those 4 years I paid $1,525.44. On three occasions I had trouble even starting up the programs and went days not being able to use any of them. I had a Backblaze cloud storage service and the Adobe CC updater was interfering with it and at one point was erasing files. Yeah, when Adobe CC works it can be great but I found it problematic. Anyway, $1,525 for Adobe CC compared to the $200 I have spent for the Mac/Windows/iPad versions of the Affinity apps. 
     
    The way I look at it over a 10 year period I would have spent over $3,800 for the Adobe CC plans, if I had paid for the entire Adobe CC, got all the apps, over a 10 year period that would have been some $6,400. Hypothetically, say I buy all of the Mac/Windows/Ipad versions of Designer, Photo, Publisher, buy them full price. Then say there is a 2.0 version of all of them and I pay full price again. Am I even up to $600 yet?
     
    Someone may pay $6400 to have access to Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign over a 10 year period whereas I pay maybe $600 to have access to Designer, Photo and Publisher, and I get to use them on my Mac, PC and my iPad Pro. Even better the $5,800 savings allows me to buy a new iPad Pro every 3 years and also buy a new desktop computer every 5 years. For me I don't see what there is to complain about in terms of pricing or flexibility. I guess people have different priorities when it comes to things, but in this instance it just reminds me of that saying 'penny wise, pound foolish'.
     
  25. Like
    Scungio got a reaction from emmrecs01 in Moving from Mac to Windows   
    Just stumbled on this topic, interesting to hear other users thoughts, or potential users thoughts anyway.
     
    Me? I was an early adopter of the Affinity apps, I have Designer for Mac, Photo for Mac, and Photo for iPad. When Designer for iPad is available I will quickly buy that. So I am a Mac guy but just last month I bought a Ryzen 7 PC and wanted to install the Affinity apps on it.
     
    Did not even blink when it came to buying the Windows versions from Serif's store. Serif has separate development teams for both platforms, yes? Seems to me that I would have to be a pretty cheap bastard (pardon my language) to expect Serif to just give me Mac and Windows installers for the low price of $50. That is lunacy. Serif has to pay their bills, their employees, etc. I feel guilty enough as is buying Serif's software because I think they should be charging more for their products.
     
    I canceled my Photoshop/Lightroom and Illustrator plans that I had the past 4 years. Over those 4 years I paid $1,525.44. On three occasions I had trouble even starting up the programs and went days not being able to use any of them. I had a Backblaze cloud storage service and the Adobe CC updater was interfering with it and at one point was erasing files. Yeah, when Adobe CC works it can be great but I found it problematic. Anyway, $1,525 for Adobe CC compared to the $200 I have spent for the Mac/Windows/iPad versions of the Affinity apps. 
     
    The way I look at it over a 10 year period I would have spent over $3,800 for the Adobe CC plans, if I had paid for the entire Adobe CC, got all the apps, over a 10 year period that would have been some $6,400. Hypothetically, say I buy all of the Mac/Windows/Ipad versions of Designer, Photo, Publisher, buy them full price. Then say there is a 2.0 version of all of them and I pay full price again. Am I even up to $600 yet?
     
    Someone may pay $6400 to have access to Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign over a 10 year period whereas I pay maybe $600 to have access to Designer, Photo and Publisher, and I get to use them on my Mac, PC and my iPad Pro. Even better the $5,800 savings allows me to buy a new iPad Pro every 3 years and also buy a new desktop computer every 5 years. For me I don't see what there is to complain about in terms of pricing or flexibility. I guess people have different priorities when it comes to things, but in this instance it just reminds me of that saying 'penny wise, pound foolish'.
     
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