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Redsandro

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  1. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Snapseed in Affinity products for Linux   
    Actually, I see a lot of users here with a license for the Mac and/or Windows version of Affinity products, would like to have a chance to (find out what it's like to) switch to Linux.
    It's often that people's first experience with Linux is a positive one, and they quickly learn that their newfound enthusiasm is met with outdated opinions, arguments from ignorance, and psychologically interesting ad hominems like rabid and zealot in which an attempt is made to argue against the positive experiences of the new Linux user by likening their personal computing choices to the the characteristics of a small idealistic group of Stallmanists in the hopes of discrediting these newfound opinions by their Windows using peers, who are afraid that some formerly trivial minority OS like Linux might take away some of their software support privileges when developers might actually choose at some point to divert some of their focus and attention to this new upcoming reality.
    Don't worry, you've got nothing to fear from this thread for at least the entire 1.x release branch.
  2. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from msdobrescu in Affinity products for Linux   
    That's a fair opinion. Others think different, and opine that the market is artificially small. It's the famous chicken and egg problem.
    We simply do not know. We can't definitively argue a position.
    We can enhance a position with anecdotal evidence, or even debate a market share multiplier for example by suggesting that user characteristics imply Linux (3.38%) could have a higher degree of creatives than MacOS (9.46%) has, similar to how MacOS might have a higher degree of creatives than Windows (86.69%) has. Since the adjusted MacOS marketshare for Affinity is 9.46/(86.69+9.46)*100 = 10%, Affinity could test this hypothesis by verifying that more than 10% of their sales are for the MacOS platform. Because if the MacOS number is 25%, it would mean the creative market share om MacOS is 2.5x bigger than the actual market share. Extrapolated to Linux, the creative market share would be similar to that of MacOS. However, when this was proposed, Affinity didn't share those figures, so we cannot argue a position on that.
    If this is literally about numbers, we could propose a no-cure-no-pay scheme like a crowdfunding campaign where a minimum sum of money would need to be raised, but Affinity already emphasized that they do not approve, will not support a crowdfund, and will not make a Linux version even if the money target would be reached. So we cannot probe any interest from that.
    So, with all avenues closed, we the users cannot definitively argue a position, and the market for creative commercial software on Linux is now Schrödinger's egg. We don't know if the chicken exists until there is professional grade photo and vector software on Linux. All we can do is share opinions.
    However, when an opinion includes ad hominems like "rabid", or empty platitudes like "It is not Serifs job to make Linux grow", it comes across as rather bitter, and we're left to speculate on the motivations and interests that inspire such fallacies.
  3. Like
    Redsandro reacted to wonderings in Affinity products for Linux   
    You seeing a lot of users is anecdotal evidence, it really means nothing in terms of hard numbers and how many actual users there could potentially be. You would certainly not be using it when developing strategies for expanding a product line into a new market. And more anecdotal evidence about users first experience. I am not afraid of Linux growing or even becoming the biggest OS in the world, I would learn to use it and continue on. When the arguments for Linux go beyond reason then they are fuelled by something else. There are Apple people like this and Windows users. They are passionate about the OS of choice and like to preach the virtues of it. I would say I was like that to a lesser degree with Apple products in the past. 
    I am not worried at all about Affinity on Linux. I think it would be great to have options for Linux users. I just do not see it being a smart move at this time. As it was said "nothing personal, it's just business". I am not emotionally attached to my computer, OS, or software. I like when they work and let me accomplish the work I need to get done. 
     
  4. Thanks
    Redsandro got a reaction from garrettm30 in Affinity products for Linux   
    Hi @Noel Schenk,
    They did not make any promise, but even if they did, it would cost a lot more than that.
    As TonyB said on July 13, 2014:
    That was in 2014 though. Five years later, they've emphasized their disinterest for a Linux version on multiple occasions.
     
    A lot of Linux users (myself included) have indicated they would pay double the Affinity license fee for native Linux versions, as an incentive for them to port them. Affinity is probably honored, but it's frankly still not worth their while. I don't think we should beg a commercial party to develop for Linux if they don't want to any further. Everyone should be happy about it, and good lock to both parties otherwise. It's better for us (Linux users) to raise bounties on FOSS software for features you are missing and/or donate it to FOSS projects: Donate to GIMP, donate to Krita, donate to InkScape or donate to the Libre Graphics Meeting.
  5. Like
    Redsandro reacted to GumboYaYa in Affinity products for Linux   
    Wow, 46 pages  Let's jump into that Linux frenzy ...
    I am digital artist and developer for many years. I was trying to give Linux a try like 15 years ago. And for me it was a disaster because I wasn't nerd enough to get all the broken things working.
    I switched back to Windows because it had all the tools available, which I needed. Especially tools for 3d stuff, which also were not available on Mac.
    Now I am working on Ubuntu for 3 years and I would never go back. And I not considering myself a bigger nerd than any other guy working in the creative area.
    I did not have any serious problem with Ubuntu since then and even if there is  something, you will find at least one answer to your problem in the net - easily.
    The most important 3d applications are also available on Linux by now - Blender (of course), Substance Suite, Unity 3d, etc.
    But what I actually want to say is that in my opinion open source software as Linux and Blender is obviously on its way to a wide audience. People and even big companies finally start to see what Open Source can do for them. And I am confident that it is just the beginning of a new paradigm in software development and licensing.
    These old licensing models Adobe and Autodesk are using (because they were able to milk their consumers very successfully over the last decades because of a lack of alternatives) will not work anymore in a few years. Also the totally unrealistic license fees they charge are (finally) doomed.
    (In my scope) Blender is maybe one of best examples. Like 10 years ago nobody took Blender seriously. And even over the last few years none of the companies I had to do with wanted to know anything about Blender. Suddenly last year it clicked and everybody wants to work with Blender. The majority of the big companies in the gaming industry are switching to Blender because they realized that they have the same or even better output by using this software instead of being slaved to giants like Autodesk or Adobe.
    In a few years there will be a very successful Open Source (or at least reasonably priced) option in every area of mass market software (Affinity is a good example here). And since Open Source is deeply rooted in Linux, I am also bold enough to predict that there will also be a paradigm change in the field of operating systems towards Linux/Open Source.
    Many are realizing that right now, and some are still holding onto the state of the art model of spending tons of money on mediocre and bloatware infested software.
    So in the end I think it would be beneficial for any company at least not being ignorant about Linux since sooner or later you will have to develop for it anyway
    Serif does a really great job since they also kind of revolutionized the graphic art industry with reasonable pricing and impressive quality of product. I guess it's just a question of time until Serif realizes that there is no way around Linux.
    Cheers,
    GumboYaYa
  6. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from motorlatitude in Affinity products for Linux   
    Linus Tech Tips made a general comparison between Windows and the new Ubuntu 20.04 with a pretty fair pro's and con's list. Interesting watch.
     
     
  7. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from jrutled3 in Affinity products for Linux   
    https://news.lenovo.com/pressroom/press-releases/lenovo-brings-linux-certification-to-thinkpad-and-thinkstation-workstation-portfolio-easing-deployment-for-developers-data-scientists/
  8. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Snapseed in Affinity products for Linux   
    Linux desktop market share above 3% for second month in a row now, rising to 3.17%.
    Considering MacOS is consistently around 9-10%, I wonder at what point Affinity might become interested. Would Designer have been made for MacOS if it only had 6% market share in stead of 9? What about 3%?
    https://netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?options={"filter"%3A{"%24and"%3A[{"deviceType"%3A{"%24in"%3A["Desktop%2Flaptop"]}}]}%2C"dateLabel"%3A"Custom"%2C"attributes"%3A"share"%2C"group"%3A"platform"%2C"sort"%3A{"share"%3A-1}%2C"id"%3A"platformsDesktop"%2C"dateInterval"%3A"Monthly"%2C"dateStart"%3A"2019-05"%2C"dateEnd"%3A"2020-05"%2C"plotKeys"%3A[{"platform"%3A"Linux"}%2C{"platform"%3A"Mac OS"}%2C{"platform"%3A"Chrome OS"}]%2C"segments"%3A"-1000"}
    I'm guessing people in lockdown are giving linux another try due to all the new releases with preinstalled video drivers, and are surprised to find that many Windows games play smoothly for both the Steam and Epic launcher. Combined with Epic's every week a free game marketing, it's tempting.
  9. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from SrPx in Affinity for Linux   
    WindowsLatest.com: Windows 10 market share drops as Ubuntu record growth
    Could that be due to many people working at home because of the Corona crisis? Perhaps computers at the office have Windows on them, while some private home computers run Linux.
  10. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from MeatRadiator in Affinity for Linux   
    WindowsLatest.com: Windows 10 market share drops as Ubuntu record growth
    Could that be due to many people working at home because of the Corona crisis? Perhaps computers at the office have Windows on them, while some private home computers run Linux.
  11. Thanks
    Redsandro got a reaction from Mark Ingram in Affinity for Linux   
    Oh yeah, we use Blackmagic Davinci Resolve (licensed), Fusion, Houdini and Blender. On CentOS. Mostly colleagues though; I'm not doing the NLE stuff. I use Ubuntu (which doesn't play nice with Blackmagic) mostly for scripting (python) which plugs into Blender, which does play nice on Ubuntu.
  12. Thanks
    Redsandro got a reaction from Dradis in Affinity for Linux   
    @Mark Ingram thank you for replying, even though you're restating what you stated before. It is appreciated to hear the current perspective and intention "renewed" with a fresh reply.
    I think it's a gamble, as some people believe that the Linux market share/demand is merely artificially small because the product/supply is not there. The wish to transition to Linux is, though, for reasons.
    You think it's not worth your while, and that's fair. It's interesting to keep an eye on Steam, because they seem to take the opposing end of the gamble, and invest a lot of time and money into developing on Linux. I don't think they are idiots. But I do understand they have a bigger budget to take risks.
    In that sense, I disagree with your notion that "the fact is". In stead, I'd rather say that you "need to follow the current market statistics rather than speculate on the size of the potential market" (demand) that is desperately waiting for your (or a competitor's) product (supply) as evidenced by 25 pages of testimony here, "for security reasons."
    Because the latter has the benefit of being closer to the truth, and won't alienate your 25 pages of Linux users that have been trying to convince you that it is, in fact, not a fact, for the past 4 years.
  13. Thanks
    Redsandro got a reaction from m.vlad in Affinity for Linux   
    @Mark Ingram You don't consider Proton a huge leap forward, or didn't know how actively it's being developed?
    Last new Steam feature for Linux I saw was creating secure isolation (sandbox) containers with different environments for different games. They've recently created Game Scopes so games are now more freely separated from the system video settings But most importantly, Proton is very actively being developed and version 5.0 was released last month.  
    Valve partnered with CodeWeavers to work on WINE. This is now (2018-2020). Not 2012.
    This empirical evidence is pretty out of date. There is this very popular friendly Pop!_OS that comes pre-installed with System76 laptops. Exclusively. It is the new old Apple; I see people that want to be cool with a System76 laptop in the coworking space. On a manual (re)install, it even has native Nvidia graphics drivers running in the installer. Not even Windows 10 does that. A more vanilla Ubuntu comes preinstalled on Dell XPS laptops. Ubuntu 20.04 is the latest LTS release, released just one week ago. They have begun rolling out the Snap store, an online software center. Installing Pop!_OS or Ubuntu is now arguably easier than installing Windows, but definitely faster.
    Anyway, I'm not trying to convince you to develop on Linux or anything, although perhaps I'm trying to bring your perception up to date a bit. 
    What I would very much like to convey though, is this message from CodeWeavers (from the above article):
    It's been asked a few times but - as far as I know - not really addressed: Can you - or why can't you - work around the things that break WINE? It's not like Windows apps can't be performant without breaking WINE, as evidenced by the WINE games that run faster under WINE than native Windows. It might consist - we don't know because it wasn't addressed - of something trivial that would make a lot of owners of a Affinity Windows license happy at the cost of very few development hours.
    They might not bring you new income, but once word gets out that a latest version runs well, more Linux users will buy Windows licenses.
  14. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from m.vlad in Affinity for Linux   
    @Mark Ingram thank you for replying, even though you're restating what you stated before. It is appreciated to hear the current perspective and intention "renewed" with a fresh reply.
    I think it's a gamble, as some people believe that the Linux market share/demand is merely artificially small because the product/supply is not there. The wish to transition to Linux is, though, for reasons.
    You think it's not worth your while, and that's fair. It's interesting to keep an eye on Steam, because they seem to take the opposing end of the gamble, and invest a lot of time and money into developing on Linux. I don't think they are idiots. But I do understand they have a bigger budget to take risks.
    In that sense, I disagree with your notion that "the fact is". In stead, I'd rather say that you "need to follow the current market statistics rather than speculate on the size of the potential market" (demand) that is desperately waiting for your (or a competitor's) product (supply) as evidenced by 25 pages of testimony here, "for security reasons."
    Because the latter has the benefit of being closer to the truth, and won't alienate your 25 pages of Linux users that have been trying to convince you that it is, in fact, not a fact, for the past 4 years.
  15. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from D’T4ils in Affinity for Linux   
    @Mark Ingram thank you for replying, even though you're restating what you stated before. It is appreciated to hear the current perspective and intention "renewed" with a fresh reply.
    I think it's a gamble, as some people believe that the Linux market share/demand is merely artificially small because the product/supply is not there. The wish to transition to Linux is, though, for reasons.
    You think it's not worth your while, and that's fair. It's interesting to keep an eye on Steam, because they seem to take the opposing end of the gamble, and invest a lot of time and money into developing on Linux. I don't think they are idiots. But I do understand they have a bigger budget to take risks.
    In that sense, I disagree with your notion that "the fact is". In stead, I'd rather say that you "need to follow the current market statistics rather than speculate on the size of the potential market" (demand) that is desperately waiting for your (or a competitor's) product (supply) as evidenced by 25 pages of testimony here, "for security reasons."
    Because the latter has the benefit of being closer to the truth, and won't alienate your 25 pages of Linux users that have been trying to convince you that it is, in fact, not a fact, for the past 4 years.
  16. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Andy2 in Affinity for Linux   
    I think that's the second most realistic approach.
    One developer at Serif (forgot the username) is/was a Linux user themselves. They are probably aware of the massive new developments in WINE concerning OpenGL, Direct3D 12, Vulkan3D. I imagine if they figured out it's technically possible to make a lot of people happy by making a slight change in the Windows version, they would.
    Third option is they start working on a Linux version. The time they said "not now, maybe later" is what, 3 years old? Later is now. Perhaps we can ask @Andy Somerfield or @TonyB if new developments or this ongoing thread in the background has changed their perspective or ambitions at all.
  17. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Andy2 in Affinity for Linux   
    False. Node.js developers were the most sought after backend developers in 2019. It is a huge success story.
    True, but the first battle is won. Linux now supports far more games than OSX through new developments. It's starting to rival Windows.
    False. Ask Red Hat Enterprise Linux what they and their billions of revenue think about free software.
    I understand your frustration but please don't spread misinformation.
  18. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Andy2 in Affinity for Linux   
    Okay. You were being ambiguous then. You seemed to talk about the Linux Foundation and how they should do something contrary to their mission. Also, the Linux Foundation doesn't really care about desktop.
    False. Look at this topic. Look at pay what you want bundles. Linux users pay the most.
    Wine argues differently:
     
  19. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Dradis in Affinity for Linux   
    I think that's the second most realistic approach.
    One developer at Serif (forgot the username) is/was a Linux user themselves. They are probably aware of the massive new developments in WINE concerning OpenGL, Direct3D 12, Vulkan3D. I imagine if they figured out it's technically possible to make a lot of people happy by making a slight change in the Windows version, they would.
    Third option is they start working on a Linux version. The time they said "not now, maybe later" is what, 3 years old? Later is now. Perhaps we can ask @Andy Somerfield or @TonyB if new developments or this ongoing thread in the background has changed their perspective or ambitions at all.
  20. Like
    Redsandro reacted to Dradis in Affinity for Linux   
    I just noticed that the two Linux threads on this forum (this thread: "Affinity for Linux" and the other, similarly named, "Affinity Products for Linux")  each dwarf the activity of all other threads by a long shot (the only other thread in the neighborhood is "Sneak Peak at 1.7").  Look not only at the number of replies (which is significant and substantially outranks the other threads) but, even more impossing, the number of views.  As I have mentioned before, you see the same thing happening on Adobe's user forum.  It's been like this for some time.
    As far as we know, both Adobe and Affinity still see it the same way.  Linux's marketshare is not worth their time.
     
    So...
    The forums aren't working.  I remember reading somewhere in my internet travelers (might have been this thread?) someone talking about their inside experience with a tech company in which the going-ons of the forums hardly reached supervisor level attention, let alone executives who make decisions.
     
    I'm at a loss of how to proceed.  Petitions have never gotten much traction (with the pitiful response they have traditionally had, compared to enthusiasm I've seen elsewhere, I wonder if the problem was more about getting the petition seen, rather than lack of interest - might be time to consider another one - if we can get it into the hands of the right blogger / influencer - but you'd have to get millions of signatures, not thousands).  If I had the connections, the experience, the knowledge,  I'd foolishly consider trying to find the capital to build the alternative myself  (if I didn't, also, realize that it has taken decades for Adobe and Affinity to get their software to were it is now).    My only thought now, is to start imploring everyone who wants to pay good money for this, to begin donating to Krita (and others) and try to help them do to graphic design what Blender did for 3D.  That, at this point, I think is our best hope.  They already have the momentum, they just need more support (while they do get donations -if you follow their website,- the financial support they get from month to month is pretty in-substantial - and yet they still do wonders with it). 
    I think a lot of the people who come to this thread are well aware of the catch-22 that Linux is caught in, in regards to market share/availability of commercial software), and how this single cause (getting a fully developed graphics / content developer sweet available for the platform), could potentially change the entire playing field for Linux desktop at large.
    But, we remain stuck.
    Any suggestions?
  21. Like
    Redsandro got a reaction from Fractoggen in Running Affinity on Linux (Finally works)   
    Not sure if relevant, but here is the English download page.
    https://store.serif.com/en-us/update/windows/photo/1/
    In case download contains i18n.
  22. Like
    Redsandro reacted to toluschr in Running Affinity on Linux (Finally works)   
    (on Fedora 30, Affinity 1.6.5.135)
     
    Information
    I tried to run Affinity previously, but only got to the point of "VK_CHILD_WINDOW_RENDERING" not being implemented and after not using Affinity Photo for a long time to stay with Linux I got the following message on Discord:

    So I had to try it out and what can I say? It works flawlessly!
     
    Installation
    Download Affinity 1.6.5 from: "https://store.serif.com/de/update/windows/photo/1/"
    The following commands are required to install and use Affinity Photo (Run EVERYTHING in the same terminal instance).
    Open a terminal in the same folder, you downloaded Affinity into!
    # Download and extract the correct wine version curl -L https://lutris.nyc3.cdn.digitaloceanspaces.com/runners/wine/wine-lutris-vkchildwindow-4.12.1-x86_64.tar.xz > wine-lutris-vkchildwindow-4.12.1-x86_64.tar.xz tar xf wine-lutris-vkchildwindow-4.12.1-x86_64.tar.xz # Set the path to wine for winetricks to work correctly export WINE="$PWD/lutris-vkchildwindow-4.12.1-x86_64/bin/wine" # Remove the old wine prefix rm -rf ~/.wine alias wine=$WINE wine wineboot -i When this window opens, click on "Cancel"

    # Downloading the newest version of winetricks curl -L https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Winetricks/winetricks/master/src/winetricks > winetricks chmod +x winetricks Now that everything is downloaded, and a new prefix was created, you have to install some dependencies.
    Follow the instructions in the setups and click on "Reboot Now". You can ignore warnings by the setups.
    # To prevent errors from mono ./winetricks remove_mono -q # For the installer ./winetricks dotnet35sp1 -q # For the main application ./winetricks dotnet472 -q # Set windows to 8.1, since aero is not found if set to win7 ./winetricks win81 -q Run the installer with: (Deselect desktop shortcut)
    wine affinity-photo-1.6.5.135.exe Install DXVK to make Affinity Photo work
    git clone https://github.com/doitsujin/dxvk ./dxvk/setup_dxvk.sh install Affinity should now be installed under "~/.wine"
     
    Desktop Shortcut
    Run this code below!
    cd ~/.local/share/applications/ echo "[Desktop Entry]" >> "Affinity Photo.desktop" echo "Name=Affinity Photo" >> "Affinity Photo.desktop" echo "Exec=$WINE '/home/$USER/.wine/drive_c/Program Files/Affinity/Photo/Photo.exe'" >> "Affinity Photo.desktop" echo "Icon='/home/$USER/.local/share/applications/$(ls ../icons/hicolor/256x256/apps | grep Photo | head -n 1)'" >> "Affinity Photo.desktop" echo "Type=Application" >> "Affinity Photo.desktop" echo "Categories=Photo;Utility;" >> "Affinity Photo.desktop"  
  23. Like
    Redsandro reacted to foxie in Affinity products for Linux   
    Hey guys,
    it seems it's finally possible to run affinity products under linux.
    https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/94180-running-affinity-on-linux-finally-works/
    I will try that later tonight and might end up producing script or flatpak with builtin dependencies.
     
    Relevant previous discussion:
    https://forum.affinity.serif.com/index.php?/topic/65310-an-attempt-to-run-affinity-designer-on-linux-via-wine/&page=2&tab=comments#comment-467010
  24. Like
    Redsandro reacted to m.vlad in Affinity for Linux   
    I think that's a statement without basis, the last one. However I agree with the core of the argument, serif is better off fixing the current issues (like the expand stroke bug, we'll soon reach 5 years since it's been first reported) than expanding into a new market. However I also have to poke holes at serifs previously mentioned accomplishments. Why boast about a platformless application core if you're not going to have it available on all platforms?
  25. Like
    Redsandro reacted to Silas in Affinity for Linux   
    Well,
    You avoided my main point, but really I think you guys are over-analysing this whole thing.
    I want Serif to build stuff for my OS of choice because on that OS I have everything I want but one thing ... Serifs excellent and sensibly priced and marketed software. While making my argument I think that there are benefits to Serif, so I mention that. The only real argument from the customer side for building the thing is that there is a market for it. I think there is.  The rest is up to them. I am here to be counted.
    If I said nothing then that would be dumb.
    If I dug holes in the argument for what I want then that too would be dumb.
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