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R C-R

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  1. Thanks
    R C-R got a reaction from Mark Ingram in Huge file size   
    Nope. As @walt.farrell mentioned in a reply in one of the other topics, that huge increase in file size is caused by saving a jpeg original (which uses lossy compression to significantly reduce file size at the expense of discarding a lot of detail) in the native Affinity file format, which among other things doesn't use lossy compression.
    Following the trail of links eventually takes one to this followup post by @Mark Ingram which should clear up any confusion about that.
    The format isn't designed just for rapid loading. It is also designed so that just the currently needed parts of files can be quickly & efficiently loaded into memory (similar I suspect to how database apps do not need to load an entire database into memory or sequentially read through the entire file to access a single record). This in turn contributes to unusually high memory efficiency, which among other things means fewer performance robbing swaps with VM & the capability of working on huge raster images without having to rely on dedicated scratch disks.
    Besides, it isn't just about reducing load (or save) times. It is all part of the effort to optimize the Affinity apps to be as responsive as possible while documents are being edited. 
  2. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from Kuso77 in Affinity Photo and Designer samples   
    Not to my knowledge. The video tutorials are not really projects, more like demonstrations of features & techniques that supplement the built-in (& online) help topics.
  3. Thanks
    R C-R got a reaction from Uwe367 in Draw a spring or wavy line; add arrow to middle of curve.   
    With this procedure, the curvature of the two end nodes don't match the curvature of the others after the conversion to smooth nodes. For some uses, this isn't desirable, but a simple modification will fix that:

  4. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from jmwellborn in Have Affinity now stopped using Pexels Stock?   
    But you can't just drag anything from Pexels in the Stock panel directly into an Affinity document like you can with Pixabay or Unsplash as the source, right? If so, then am I correct in assuming that the main function of the Stock panel is not working with Pexels for you either?
  5. Thanks
    R C-R reacted to walt.farrell in Workbook pages 373-376   
    I made two posts on that thread; I think the one that R C-R meant is this one:
     
  6. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from haakoo in Facial Recognition... How Would or Could Affinity Photo Do It?   
    Please keep in mind that help from forum members is indeed voluntary, that some members are trying to provide help for a great many different people, & that creating a recipe that is clear & detailed enough for anyone not already somewhat familiar with the techniques involved can take many times longer than just doing the improvement on their own computer & posting the result.
    As a courtesy to them, it is also a good idea to keep the narratives in posts asking for help short & to the point, concentrating on whatever seems most relevant to whatever it is you are having difficulties doing -- if they have to take a lot of time to wade through irrelevant stuff, they may be less inclined to spend more time on detailed replies before moving on to some other topic.
  7. Like
    R C-R reacted to Cecil in Photo: How to texture paint without blending?   
    Thanks, just wanted to ensure I didn’t overlook link to download the e-book.
  8. Thanks
    R C-R got a reaction from Alfred in Need help on coloring   
    What I mean is how (in what format) was the file exported from clip studio paint to bring it in(to) AD.
  9. Thanks
    R C-R reacted to dutchshader in Linking Files   
    they were just paths to the file, the relative link was created on export to pdf.
    i didn't save the file.
  10. Haha
    R C-R reacted to dutchshader in Linking Files   
    that was a little mistake, i did not have the hyperlink window open, and thought is said image.
    edited a little later, but the damage was done 
  11. Like
    R C-R reacted to walt.farrell in Linking Files   
    For that to work, one thing you'll have to do is edit the Hyperlink path to make it relative. You'll first need to click the ... in the Text > Interactive > Insert Hyperlink dialog to locate the file, then you'll need to remove everything prior to the file name. Or, depending on how you package it, you may need to make other adjustments; without more details of your directory organization on your system and in the exported package I can't say for sure.
    Then you'll need to manually package your PDF and the file(s) you've hyperlinked into a new directory.
  12. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from Kuso77 in how do I modify channels freely   
    FWIW, the (now "LEGACY") Official Affinity Photo (Desktop) Video Tutorials page has (mostly) been updated with working links. I added a browser bookmark to it to make it easier to find. You might want to do the same.
    Just keep in mind that some of the old video tutorials have been superseded by new ones, but many are still relevant & cover topics the new ones do not (yet) cover.
  13. Like
    R C-R reacted to dutchshader in brushes   
  14. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from John Rostron in Scratch disks   
    Longer answer:
    PS needs a fast scratch disk to maintain its performance because it can create huge numbers of 'scratch' items that have to be stored somewhere for as long as they are needed. For large documents with lots of layers these files require much more storage space than even a system crammed full with as much RAM as it can support, so they are offloaded either to VM (virtual memory) disk space under the control of the OS, or to one or more scratch disks designated in & controlled by PS itself.
    If the scratch disk(s) & the interface(s) to them are faster than what the system can provide via its built-in VM management, then the performance boost is considerable. This also has the advantage, particularly important on systems with relatively small SSD's, of providing lots & lots of scratch space that does not have to be shared with system or other applications.
    However, offloading anything to VM or even to very fast scratch drives is still much slower than if everything could be stored in RAM, so the Affinity approach is to minimize the amount of RAM required to edit documents to avoid that whole issue (& the expense of extra dedicated drives). But how well that works in the real world depends on several complex interrelated factors, including how much RAM other processes running at the same time on the computer need, how the OS prioritizes memory swaps with VM for all active & inactive processes, if & where a saved version of the document might be stored, & some other arcane stuff mostly related to the particulars of the OS, its memory management system, & how well (if at all) hardware GPU acceleration is implemented in the app itself.
    So while there is no simple answer for this, currently the Affinity approach works much better on Macs than on Windows PCs. I know they are working on improving Windows version performance, & while scratch disks may be the way to go for them, it probably won't be as important for the Mac ones.
  15. Thanks
    R C-R got a reaction from Bibi McMurray in Affinity Designer crashing because program files scattered on E drive.   
    Maybe it is different for Windows but on Macs all the assets, custom brushes, & so on are stored on a per user basis (so each user account can have its own stuff), not in or with the application. On Macs, these per user items are saved on the startup drive by default -- it is possible to move the user account folder to a different drive but this must be done explicitly in a multi-step process using the command line interface.
    So assuming it is similar for Windows, all the assets & such would already be stored on the C drive & just uninstalling & reinstalling the app might be all that is needed ... assuming the uninstall process does not 'helpfully' remove all the per user files as well.
  16. Thanks
    R C-R got a reaction from walt.farrell in Cannot see hyperlinks   
    I have never tried exporting an .afpub document with hyperlinks to the PSD format. Anybody know if that works?
  17. Thanks
    R C-R reacted to Dan C in Cannot see hyperlinks   
    AFAIK Photoshop (and therefore .PSDs) don't natively support hyperlinks, as Photoshop uses the Slice tool to create a HTML sidecar file and therefore the hyperlink won't be retained in a .PSD from Affinity - however if anyone knows more in regards to PS/.PSDs than I do I'd be more than happy to learn!
  18. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from John Rostron in Scratch disks   
    Longer answer:
    PS needs a fast scratch disk to maintain its performance because it can create huge numbers of 'scratch' items that have to be stored somewhere for as long as they are needed. For large documents with lots of layers these files require much more storage space than even a system crammed full with as much RAM as it can support, so they are offloaded either to VM (virtual memory) disk space under the control of the OS, or to one or more scratch disks designated in & controlled by PS itself.
    If the scratch disk(s) & the interface(s) to them are faster than what the system can provide via its built-in VM management, then the performance boost is considerable. This also has the advantage, particularly important on systems with relatively small SSD's, of providing lots & lots of scratch space that does not have to be shared with system or other applications.
    However, offloading anything to VM or even to very fast scratch drives is still much slower than if everything could be stored in RAM, so the Affinity approach is to minimize the amount of RAM required to edit documents to avoid that whole issue (& the expense of extra dedicated drives). But how well that works in the real world depends on several complex interrelated factors, including how much RAM other processes running at the same time on the computer need, how the OS prioritizes memory swaps with VM for all active & inactive processes, if & where a saved version of the document might be stored, & some other arcane stuff mostly related to the particulars of the OS, its memory management system, & how well (if at all) hardware GPU acceleration is implemented in the app itself.
    So while there is no simple answer for this, currently the Affinity approach works much better on Macs than on Windows PCs. I know they are working on improving Windows version performance, & while scratch disks may be the way to go for them, it probably won't be as important for the Mac ones.
  19. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from Geoff777 in Photoshop Shortcuts Template   
    There may be some user created custom shortcut files that include some of the PS ones, but since there are quite a few functional differences between how PS & AP implement various things, it is probably too much to hope for that any of them would include most of the PS ones. If nothing else, there is no equivalent in PS of Affinity's Personas, & as you may know it is possible to assign different shortcuts to different Personas instead of 'global' ones that apply in all Personas.
    Also keep in mind that shortcut files for Windows won't work with the Mac versions & visa versa (the extensions are different), so if you do find a user created template you would like to use, make sure it is for the same OS you use.
  20. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from Callum in Linking Files   
    It isn't totally clear to me what "Desktop" is in your video, but it appears to be an iCloud volume named "Desktop," not your Mac's startup drive's desktop, & at about 2:40 in the video you can see that it is full ("iCloud storage is full").
     I also think you said something ("Wise Budget" maybe?) was already saved somewhere but it does not show up in your video in this iCloud "Desktop" folder, so I do not understand how you could save it there (because iCloud storage is full), if that is what you are trying to do.
    There are other things not clear from your video (which is why you have been asked to supply a text description in both your topics!) but for now please at least clear up the above.
  21. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from Roger C in Close space between deleted art boards   
    Another way to do this is to select all the artboards & use the Alignment options. If you use the "Space Horizontally" option with "Auto Distribute" disabled, you can adjust the horizontal spacing between artboards uniformly to whatever you want by adjusting the numeric spacing field next to the "Auto Distribute" checkbox.
    If needed, you can also use one of the Align vertically options to line up all the artboards in a row.

  22. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from walt.farrell in Is text in Affinity Designer automatically vector text?   
    By default, the Affinity apps (there are 3 of them) create text objects. Like vector objects they are not rasterized by default, but unlike vector objects text objects support a large number of additional typographic attributes in addition to the usual vector ones like stroke & fill color.
    The Affinity apps support all the common ones (& many of the uncommon ones as well). With the appropriate settings you can control everything from the space between characters, words, & paragraphs to their alignments, indents, alternate character forms, & much more. Text in this form is often referred to as "editable text" because you can edit it in much the same way you could in a word processor.
    If you convert it to vectors ("convert to curves" in Affinity-speak) you lose the ability to edit it as text, but it retains the usual properties of vector objects like scaling up without becoming pixelated or blurry. Note that this conversion will result in lots of individual vector objects (at least one per character & often more).
    Rasterizing text converts it to a grid of pixels, with all the usual limitations of that format. Even if you do not do this explicitly in Affinity, this will occur automatically in any export file format that does not support vectors or text objects (like JPEG), or if you use certain Affinity features like effects, filters, etc. Also, as things are now (& most likely for years to come) exporting to the PSD file format will convert text to pixels.
    Be aware that in Affinity Photo (but not in Affinity Designer or Affinity Publisher) text objects will always look pixelated with anti-aliased edges, but as long as it remains a text object it actually is not.
  23. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from walt.farrell in Is text in Affinity Designer automatically vector text?   
    By default, the Affinity apps (there are 3 of them) create text objects. Like vector objects they are not rasterized by default, but unlike vector objects text objects support a large number of additional typographic attributes in addition to the usual vector ones like stroke & fill color.
    The Affinity apps support all the common ones (& many of the uncommon ones as well). With the appropriate settings you can control everything from the space between characters, words, & paragraphs to their alignments, indents, alternate character forms, & much more. Text in this form is often referred to as "editable text" because you can edit it in much the same way you could in a word processor.
    If you convert it to vectors ("convert to curves" in Affinity-speak) you lose the ability to edit it as text, but it retains the usual properties of vector objects like scaling up without becoming pixelated or blurry. Note that this conversion will result in lots of individual vector objects (at least one per character & often more).
    Rasterizing text converts it to a grid of pixels, with all the usual limitations of that format. Even if you do not do this explicitly in Affinity, this will occur automatically in any export file format that does not support vectors or text objects (like JPEG), or if you use certain Affinity features like effects, filters, etc. Also, as things are now (& most likely for years to come) exporting to the PSD file format will convert text to pixels.
    Be aware that in Affinity Photo (but not in Affinity Designer or Affinity Publisher) text objects will always look pixelated with anti-aliased edges, but as long as it remains a text object it actually is not.
  24. Haha
    R C-R got a reaction from v_kyr in Written tutorials   
    So ... resistance is futile? 
  25. Like
    R C-R got a reaction from GarryP in AD continuing a curve   
    To add a bit to that, you must have a start or end node of an open curve selected to add a new node to it with the Pen Tool. To make this easier, with the Pen Tool selected, you can temporarily switch to the Node Tool by holding down a modifier key (CMD on Macs, I assume CTRL on Windows) to reselect the curve (if necessary) & then to select a start or end node.
    Also, this works whether or not the "Add New Curve To Selected Curves Object" option (the button with the two overlapping circles in the context toolbar) is enabled. The difference is that option adds a new, unconnected curve to the "(Curve)" layer (as Garry's GIF shows) when the existing selected curve does not have any of its nodes preselected.
    In effect, this 'Add New Curve' option is somewhat like using the "Add" boolean on several open curve layers to get a "(Curves)" layer, but (hooray for this!) does so without the not-always-so-helpful side effect of automatically closing the open curves when boolean added to make the "(Curves)" layer.
    Maybe a bit weirdly, if you select two or more open curves not part of the same layer & use the Layer > Geometry > Merge Curves menu item, this also produces a single "(Curves)" layer, but that does not close the open curves like the boolean add does. 
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