Jump to content
You must now use your email address to sign in [click for more info] ×

kirkt

Members
  • Posts

    440
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    kirkt reacted to Fujial in Newbie - how do I dodge and burn in affinity photo   
    Duplicate Layer!!!  💡 🤯🙄
    I initially added a pixel layer using the little checkerboard icon in the layers tab in studio (I think I've got the nomenclature right?) thinking that the layer would overlay the original but as has been said, I now see that there is no data in it to be dodged or burned.
    The duplicate layer worked immediately with dodging and burning and also carried brushing using the grayscale palette.  The added pixel layer also worked with the paint brush because I now see that you're actually adding something but only when you use more than 50% grey.
    Thank you for your responses and patience everyone.  I'm coming at this as a newbie to post processing and not from PS (I've had a couple of false starts with affinity).  If anyone knows of any truly idiots guide stuff online, youtube, books etc I'd be grateful of any recommendation.  I think there may be a need for baby steps tutorials or book of key principles for people like me.  And I've not even started thinking about mask layers, adjustment layers, fill layers ................
    Thanks again and stay safe😷
  2. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from R C-R in Infer LUT confusion   
    @Claire_Marie - As @Lee D notes, the Infer LUT operation compares the before and after color of an image and tries to reverse engineer the color in the after image based on the before image.  Some images that are used in the Infer LUT operation may not have a very wide variety of tone or color represented in them, so when inferring a LUT from them, the inferred LUT only captures part of the toning (the toning restricted to the colors present in the image).  One way that LUTs are stored in a graphical format is to use a before and after version of a special color image called an Identity (ungraded, neutral) HALD CLUT (color lookup table) image like this one:

    As you can see, this special image is essentially a grid of colors with a wide range of tonal and hue variation.  Copy this HALD image and run it through your filter and then use the before and after versions of it as your Infer LUT base images.  The Identity HALD image contains a lot of colors and will capture your filter's color transform fully.  As with all LUTs, the HALD images need to be in the color space of the image you are editing for the color transform of the LUT to work as expected.
    Here is  link to a page of technical LUTs which includes the original HALD image I posted here:
    https://3dlutcreator.com/3d-lut-creator---materials-and-luts.html
    For example, here is a webpage that contains a link to several HALD CLUTs that capture color transforms for several film simulations.  You can use these in AP to apply a film look to your image with a LUT adjustment layer and the Infer LUT feature.
    https://patdavid.net/2015/03/film-emulation-in-rawtherapee.html
    Kirk
  3. Like
    kirkt reacted to Old Bruce in Copy/export what I see   
    Literally as well as figuratively.
  4. Like
    kirkt reacted to Old Bruce in Copy/export what I see   
    You might be better served using a Threshold layer instead of the Levels, regardless the way to get what you want is to use Edit > Copy Merged once you have the image the way you like it.
  5. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from marciomendonsa in Filters in the Black and White tool   
    @marciomendonsa
    You can model this with a Photo Filter adjustment layer placed under a Black and White adjustment layer.  Set the Black and White adjustment to neutral and then dial in the color of the filter in the Photo Filter layer - uncheck "Preserve luminosity" to have the more optically dense color filter cut out more light, as a real filter would do.
    Kirk
  6. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from Ulysses in Feature Request - Alpha Channels (AGAIN!)   
    @Gregory Chalenko
    A couple of thoughts in the meanwhile - 1) You can reset the view from individual channels to the composite by clicking on the clockwise circular icon with the arrowhead in the upper right of the channels view.
    2) You can replicate your mask construction process in AP but it works a little differently, partially because channels and masks work differently in AP compared to PS.
    a) Starting with your source image, make a duplicate of the image layer upon which you want to base your mask (CMD-J) and make this layer active.  We will call this the "LayerForMask" in the layer stack.
    b) Inspect your channels to see which one (or a combination of more than one, in overlay mode as you demonstrate in your YouTube clip) you want to use as the basis for your mask.  
    c) If you want to combine channels in Overlay mode, for example: With the "LayerForMask" as the active layer, go to Filters > Apply Image... and choose to "Use Current Layer As Source."  Set the Blend Mode to "Overlay."  Finally, select the "Equations" check box - let's say in this example, you want to combine the Green and Blue channels in overlay mode like you do in PS using Calculations.  Here you will set "DG = SB" [Destination Green equals Source Blue) and "DB = SG" - you are basically switching the two channels and combining the result in Overlay mode.  This will give you a high-contrast result in the G channel that you can use as the basis for the mask.
    d) Click on the Composite Green channel in the Channels panel of the resulting image that now occupies the LayerForMask layer - this will display the grayscale result of the operation you just performed, and you can inspect the result to see if it is satisfactory to use as a mask.  This is because the top layer in the stack is the result of the Apply Image process (therefore, the Composite layer is the top layer and you can view its channels).  Also take a look at the Blue channel.  In this example, suppose you want to use the resulting Green Channel as the basis for your mask.
    e) Below the Composite layer channels in the Channels panel will be the LayerForMask channels listed.  In this case we want to use the Green channel for our mask, so Right-Click on the Green channel for this layer and select "Create Grayscale Layer" - this will create a grayscale copy of the Green channel at the top of the layer stack.  This is a pixel layer that you can edit with all of the tools like dodge and burn, etc. to construct and refine your mask.  We will call this "WorkingMaskLayer."
    f) Once you have perfected your mask on the WorkingMaskLayer, this pixel layer can stay in the layer stack for further editing if you want, or stored as a spare channel, etc.  In any case, in the Channels panel, Right-Click on any of the channels in the WorkingMaskLayer and select "Create Mask Layer" - this will create a new Mask Layer out of the grayscale image from WorkingMaskLayer and you can drag the new mask layer onto the layer to which you want to apply the mask.
    A Mask Layer is a special kind of layer in AP - it is similar to the layer mask layer that is attached to a layer in PS, except it is a separable element that you can move up and down the layer stack and nest with other layers.  You can edit and paint on a mask layer as well, if you prefer to refine your mask that way - you can view the mask itself (instead of its effect on the layer stack) by OPT-Clicking (ALT-Clicking) on it, just like in PS.
    Kirk
  7. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Dan C in Pasting Into An Alpha Channel   
    @WG48 - In AP, you can emulate the effect of the monochrome checkbox that is in PS by:
    0) - It looks like you added a HSL adjustment (A in the attached screenshot) to accentuate the blue of the tarnish.
    1) Add a Channel Mixer adjustment layer (B) to the stack (this is where you will accentuate the tarnish by manipulating the R, G and B content in each channel)
    2) The effects of the Channel Mixer (D) can be seen in monochrome by viewing just the targeted channel of the composite image.  In this case, the blue area will be WHITE in the mask you ultimately want to create, and the rest of the image should be BLACK or dark, to avoid being affected by whatever adjustment you make.  In other words, the adjustment you ultimately make will target the blue area in the image, which has been intensified by the HSL boost in step 0.
    In the Channels panel (C), click on the blue composite channel thumbnail to view just the blue channel, in grayscale.  In the Channel Mixer adjustment, select the blue channel (D) and push the blue (dirty) channel slider up to 200% and the red (clean) channel down to 200% or so.  The composite blue channel should look a lot like the mask you posted in the screenshot of the PS result.
    You can right-click on the blue channel and create a "Spare Channel" from the blue channel - this will be your mask (E - I renamed the Spare Channel "BLUEMASK").
     
    Kirk

  8. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in Pasting Into An Alpha Channel   
    @WG48 - In AP, you can emulate the effect of the monochrome checkbox that is in PS by:
    0) - It looks like you added a HSL adjustment (A in the attached screenshot) to accentuate the blue of the tarnish.
    1) Add a Channel Mixer adjustment layer (B) to the stack (this is where you will accentuate the tarnish by manipulating the R, G and B content in each channel)
    2) The effects of the Channel Mixer (D) can be seen in monochrome by viewing just the targeted channel of the composite image.  In this case, the blue area will be WHITE in the mask you ultimately want to create, and the rest of the image should be BLACK or dark, to avoid being affected by whatever adjustment you make.  In other words, the adjustment you ultimately make will target the blue area in the image, which has been intensified by the HSL boost in step 0.
    In the Channels panel (C), click on the blue composite channel thumbnail to view just the blue channel, in grayscale.  In the Channel Mixer adjustment, select the blue channel (D) and push the blue (dirty) channel slider up to 200% and the red (clean) channel down to 200% or so.  The composite blue channel should look a lot like the mask you posted in the screenshot of the PS result.
    You can right-click on the blue channel and create a "Spare Channel" from the blue channel - this will be your mask (E - I renamed the Spare Channel "BLUEMASK").
     
    Kirk

  9. Like
    kirkt reacted to walt.farrell in Topaz Denoise AI plugin on a NEF RAW file (was Dr.)   
    Welcome to the Serif Affinity forums, @Archimedes-3.14.
    Please check your settings in the Develop Assistant (View > Assistant Manager..., and then possibly click Develop Assistant...). It is likely that you are developing to a color format not supported by Topaz Denoise AI. For example, perhaps you're developing to RGB (32 Bit HDR) and Topaz only works if you specify RGB (16 Bit).
  10. Like
  11. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from ThatMikeGuy in Node-based UI for AP. Please?   
    While I do not profess to know how AP is structured under-the-hood (bonnet!), it seems like a lot of the tools are implemented in a real-time, live way that seems as if they would work in a node-based workflow.  For example, the node editor in Blender or Davinci Resolve.  If this is the case, it would be an incredibly terrific feature if the user could select between the current "traditional" interface and workflow for AP, or a node-based interface.  I would love to be able to create an image-processing pipeline with a network for nodes with preview renders along the way to see each stage of the workflow and variations of the node chain.  It would be terrific if node groups could be saved as "presets" that became single nodes themselves, which could be expanded and the contents exposed for tweaking and customization.  
    Please consider this approach, if it is possible.  Rendering low-res preview proxies during node assembly would hopefully be a lot less taxing on the interface than the current full-res rendering of Live Filters that tends to get laggy when there are even a modest amount of layers in the stack.  You could save full, non-destructive workflows as a pre-built node chain, you could have a single node chain branch into multiple variants, and have a batch node that feeds an entire directory of images into the node chain for processing.  Maybe even macro nodes, etc.  It would be so much more flexible and serve to further differentiate AP from PS.
    The output of the node-based workflow could be fed into the "traditional" photo persona (a Photo persona node) for local, destructive edits, painting on masks, etc.
    One can dream....  LOL
    Thanks for pushing the boundaries with your applications.
    Kirk
     
  12. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Alfred in SLOG photo automatically colored when imported   
    @Pike11 You probably need to define how you are viewing the “raw file” in the rendering that looks low contrast, like a log-encoded image typically looks. Is that a camera JPEG?  The raw file should be raw, without encoding, but may have a tag that is read by some viewers or converters to render it with log encoding.  I do not know specifically how Sony might do this  
    You can create an SLog RGB file in AP by rendering the raw file to a 32 bit RGB file with no tone curve (linear output) and then using an OCIO adjustment layer to transform the linear file to SLog. That will give you the starting point It sounds like you are looking for. 
     
    Kirk
     
  13. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from Chris B in Lab unusual color, have you noticed? Huge difference!   
    Just to clarify, without knowing why you work in Lab and what you are trying to accomplish, it is not straightforward to find a work around the suits your workflow.  I'm not sure why adding a Curves layer with a flat L curve is not working for you, but it should, and it is non-destructive.
    Some examples of what you can do non-destructively - let's say you want to isolate the b channel and blend it into the original in Overlay mode to pump up the blue-yellow color contrast.  Add a Curves adjustment layer and make the L and the a curves flat, as above.  This will produce the b channel, in color, as you have shown in your previous post.  Set the Curve adjustment layer to Overlay and you're done.  I am not sure what you are trying to do, but there are probably ways of getting it done that involve simple adjustment layer operations that are non-destructive - the methods are just different than PS.
    Kirk
  14. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from IPv6 in Lab unusual color, have you noticed? Huge difference!   
    Just to clarify, without knowing why you work in Lab and what you are trying to accomplish, it is not straightforward to find a work around the suits your workflow.  I'm not sure why adding a Curves layer with a flat L curve is not working for you, but it should, and it is non-destructive.
    Some examples of what you can do non-destructively - let's say you want to isolate the b channel and blend it into the original in Overlay mode to pump up the blue-yellow color contrast.  Add a Curves adjustment layer and make the L and the a curves flat, as above.  This will produce the b channel, in color, as you have shown in your previous post.  Set the Curve adjustment layer to Overlay and you're done.  I am not sure what you are trying to do, but there are probably ways of getting it done that involve simple adjustment layer operations that are non-destructive - the methods are just different than PS.
    Kirk
  15. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from angelhdz12 in [MISSING FEATURE] Flip Vertical/Horizontal Icon Affinity Photo   
    Both versions of "Flip" (Document and Arrange) are available for assignment to keyboard shortcuts.  One less mouse movement and button press.
    Kirk

  16. Confused
    kirkt got a reaction from Pšenda in [MISSING FEATURE] Flip Vertical/Horizontal Icon Affinity Photo   
    Both versions of "Flip" (Document and Arrange) are available for assignment to keyboard shortcuts.  One less mouse movement and button press.
    Kirk

  17. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from fde101 in [MISSING FEATURE] Flip Vertical/Horizontal Icon Affinity Photo   
    Both versions of "Flip" (Document and Arrange) are available for assignment to keyboard shortcuts.  One less mouse movement and button press.
    Kirk

  18. Like
    kirkt reacted to Patrick Connor in Your Affinity 2020 wishlist   
    It keeps the slider having a useful smaller range and therefore finer increments, without stopping other larger values being typed in.
  19. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from Peter Heinrichs in Your Affinity 2020 wishlist   
    @Peter Heinrichs - you can type a value in the radius input field that is greater than the slider maximum.  This is true of a lot of sliders with an input field.
    Kirk
  20. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from Patrick Connor in Your Affinity 2020 wishlist   
    @Peter Heinrichs - you can type a value in the radius input field that is greater than the slider maximum.  This is true of a lot of sliders with an input field.
    Kirk
  21. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from John Rostron in How to export/save as a raw format file?   
    I know that the following suggestion does not address the AP/raw output discussion, but for folks who need to import and export raw (as in "not camera raw") data, you can use the free, and open, tool called NIH Image, or ImageJ, or Fiji (Fiji Is Just ImageJ).  I currently use the Fiji version, but they are all the same thing.  The application reads and writes raw output and is a general purpose image processing tool with a macro language to automate tasks.  I am not sure what the CG folks might be doing with PS to edit their data prior to output to raw, but Fiji might be an alternative and a viable way to remove PS from your workflow.  It is also cross-platform (Mac, Win, Linux) and is continually being updated and cared for.
    https://fiji.sc
    It gives the user direct access to algorithmic and mathematical manipulation of their image data, instead of the more qualitative, by eye approach in PS.
    Kirk
    PS - to James Ritson's comment -
    Yes, DxO produces a linear DNG when it applies adjustments to a raw file and exports it as DNG.  This way, users can apply things like optical corrections and noise reduction to a raw image file within DxO and then export a DNG with those corrections to another raw converter, like Lightroom.  This operation requires demosaicing of the raw file so that the pixel-based operations can be rendered.
  22. Like
    kirkt reacted to Fixx in How to export/save as a raw format file?   
    People are talking about two different "RAW"s in this thread. Camera RAW is well understood, Photoshop raw is something quite different. Photoshop raw is just a bunch of numbers with as little formatting as possible, being the ”rawest” possible way to describe a pixel image. Not many people need it, but it seems Unity3D platform benefits of it use.
  23. Like
    kirkt got a reaction from emmrecs01 in Need more features on photo retouching and image manipulation   
    You can run Topaz Sharpen AI as a plug in from AP.  Why reinvent the wheel?  There are a few different ways to try to analyze an image for shake and correct it, but building an AI model and implementing it is probably time better spent by the AP devs.
    Kirk
  24. Like
    kirkt reacted to thegary in Technical Drawing with Affinity Designer   
    something like CADTOOLS  for illustrator would be fantastic.
     
    Gary
     
  25. Thanks
    kirkt got a reaction from keena in Feature Request - Alpha Channels (AGAIN!)   
    @Gregory Chalenko
    If you want to create a grayscale image from the Spare Channel there are a couple of ways, one of which may be better than the other for your application:
    1) Make a new pixel layer and fill it with White - we will call this new layer "BlankLayer."
    2a) Right-click on the Spare Channel that you have stored and select "Load to BlankLayer Red" - repeat but select "Load to BlankLayer Green" and ""Load to BlankLayer Blue."  Now you have a grayscale pixel layer that is a copy of the Spare Channel.  You can make a Macro that will do the sequence of steps.
    or
    2b) Right-click on the Spare Channel and select "Load to BlankLayer Alpha."  The Spare Channel will be transferred to the BlankLayer Alpha channel.  In the Channels panel list, right-click on the BlankLayer Alpha channel and select "Create Grayscale Layer."  In this case, the BlankLayer is a temporary layer that you use to hold the Alpha channel so you can make the grayscale image from it.
    I suggest that you right-click on all of the channel thumbnails in the Channels panel and see what options each one has - there is a lot going on there, but it is sort of hidden until you realize that the options exist!  Also, even though these work-arounds require additional button presses and steps, I think that all of the steps are able to be recorded in a macro, so you could automate the process by recording a Macro.
     
    Kirk
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines | We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.