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jtriangle

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  1. I'd take it however they wanted to do it honestly. Steam/proton is a decent enough platform, and, I'm more than willing to jump through any hoops that they decide are necessary (likely for anti-piracy reasons).
  2. Sure, you wouldn't buy 20 licenses and yolo your whole company into it. You'd buy one license, or a trial, and make sure it works for what you need it for. Trials are available for existing platforms, so, stands to reason that they'd also be available for a linux version. I don't personally see fragmentation as a huge issue, nor is the lack of fragmentation a great selling point when the alternative is essentially indentured servitude to adobe. All of the fragmentation is solved by using PDF if you need to ship a file somewhere, hence "portable document format", which is a trick that psd
  3. You don't have to be a genius to look at a product offering and realize that it's more than adequate for your needs. At this point, there's a wealth of knowledge on youtube about how Affinity, and many other apps, work. And, factually, having used the apps, it's abundantly clear that they don't intend to just replace AdobeCC, but instead build a better app all around. That shouldn't come as a surprise, Adobe is in an unenviable situation with their apps. If they changed them enough that they would work better, they'd break all kinds of legacy support, not to mention the collective user scre
  4. There were 11 million PC's sold in the USA during Q1 2020, so, that's 396K linux installs. Affinity needs 10,000 of them to buy software to break even. Again, that's only PC's sold this year, and only in the US, using your numbers. By your logic, they shouldn't bother with OSX users either, because it's wasted money when you could just write windows software. Windows is the overwhelming majority of the market afterall, so, according to what you're saying, Affinity should discontinue support for OSX, because it's only 9.6% of the market. Totally not worth it. Or, perhaps it's
  5. As an arch user, I'd be more than happy to have a SteamOS like distro to run Affinity in, and that's probably a viable course of action because they'd have absolute control over the OS out of the box. Also, for clarity, Affiniti themselves estimated that it'd be $500k to port it over. Not zero money, but, that's only around 10k licenses to break even at the current pricing. My assumption is that the current install base is much, much larger than 10,000 users. They could likely also hedge that a little by offering an enterprise support tier for bigger money. The fact is, the only option o
  6. The big production houses are all using proprietary software that they've had written for their uses. That, and big production houses are a tiny market because there's not that many of them. The real money for affinity is in the average joes who have enough of a brain to not want to get tied into the Adobe Serfdom Pay Per Month plan. That's a growing market of tech-savvy people, and tech savvy people tend to at least know about linux, and the ones that have the ability to do so, run it as their main OS. Aside from that, you have your average corporate market, who shells out big money for
  7. Seeing as affinity is very happy to hide all of the users clamoring for a linux version in this thread, I've copied my, now locked reply, below. If you want a no-nonsense experience, Ubuntu is probably the last distro I would consider. Sure its install base is large, it also comes with a whole bunch of unnecessary stuff, and, while its userbase is large, they're not as savvy, so, more tech support issues from users who just don't know what they're doing in general.The play is to go with something more vanilla, like debian, or, something with a better userbase, like manjaro. Focusing on a s
  8. If you want a no-nonsense experience, Ubuntu is probably the last distro I would consider. Sure its install base is large, it also comes with a whole bunch of unnecessary stuff, and, while its userbase is large, they're not as savvy, so, more tech support issues from users who just don't know what they're doing in general. The play is to go with something more vanilla, like debian, or, something with a better userbase, like manjaro. Focusing on a single distro is a good move from a development standpoint, especially if you can open source a good portion of the code and let the community fix
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